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Congratualtions 






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salutes graduates. 

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Antioch News-Reporter 






01993-A Schroeder Publication 



VOL 107-NO.23 



ANTIOCH, JUNE 4, 1993 



TWO SECTIONS-72 PAGES 



500 PER COPY 




Safety trip to new rail service 

Edward Burkhardt, far right, president of tine Wiconsin Central, talks with Village 
of Wtieeling President Sheila Schultz (red dress) /Lake -County Coroner Barbara 
Richardson and Buffalo Grove Village President Sidney H. Malhias about future 
passenger rail service along the Wisconsin Central line between Antioch and 
Des Plaines. Turn to page 11 for a complete story. — Photo by Gene Gabry 

Litttest graduates get diplomas 



by MARY FOLEY 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The Anlioch Head Start class of 1992- 
1993 held its graduation ceremony at the 
Tower Room in Anlioch last week. The 
use of the Tower Room was graciously 
donated by the owners. 

During the graduation, parents and 
families were treated to a numt>cr of 
songs. The children received diplomas or 
certificates, and Thera Ramos, Lake 
County Head Start Director.. had a few 
words of advice to the parenis.- 

"Wc do not want this iq be their last 
graduation" said Ramos. "I want all of 
you parents to do your part." ^ 

Over 15 children received their 
diplomas, while 13 students, not yet 
kindergarten age, received ccnificaies. 



The Antioch Head Start program is a 
federally funded program for low income 
and special needs preschoolers. It is 
located at the St. Stephen's Church on 
Hillside. 

The center has been at that location for 
three years. Before moving there, it was 
located on the Lake Villa grounds of the 
Central Baptist Children's Home. 

The center is licensed for 31 children 
between the ages of 4 and 5. The 
program runs from September to May, 
and the children attend from 9 a.m. to 
1:30 p.m. Busing, breakfast and lunches 
arc provided. 

The program focus is on the entire 
development of the child. There arc many 
field trips, monthly library visits, and 
(Continued on page 9) 




Antioch Head Start class of '93 at the Tower Room. The Head Start program is 
held at St. Stephen's Church. 



Iceless hockey alive 

League, family of 
child with disability 
look for solutions 



by THOMAS STEVENS 

Lakeland Newspapers 

What began as a routine sign-up of an 
11 -year-old for an Iceless Hockey team 
last fall, has turned into a battle of 
principles which could, in the long run, 
threaten the league's existence. 

At the center of the controversy is a 
bright-eyed youth named Patrick Brankin, 
who unfortunately was bom and diagnosed 
with Down's syndrome, a congenital 
condition characterizxd by mental 
dcnciencics. Patrick just wants to play 
iceless hockey like a number of his 
school mates at Lake Villa's Pleviak 
School. 

However, Patrick played only a half of 
a game last winter, after officials at the 
Lake Villa Iceless Hockey League 
determined Patrick's play "dangerous" to 
other children on the floor. 

The complaint filed by the Brankin's, 
Rick and Donna on behalf of their son, 
wiih the Illinois Department of Human 
Rights and the State of Illinois Board of 
Educalion, now could doom the future of 
one of the area's most popular sports for 
youth to participate in. 



On one side arc the Brankins, who 
believe their son can be taught slick 
control and the mles of the iceless hockey 
game, so he can play at a level that would 
be safe for himself and those who 
participate with him. 

"We are not looking for special 
treatment," said Brankin. "Wc just want 
reasonable accommodation for Patrick." 

One the other is Paul La Rouche, 
president of the league, and the league 
board of directors, which makes policy 
and makes the personnel choices for the 
league. 

LaRouche admits to giving Brankin a 
tryout for Patrick, despite breaking a 
league tradition of not doing so, to see if 
Paurick could play and not become a 
safety factor. 

"Patrick was wild with his slick,' said 
LaRouche. "I would love to see Patrick 
play in the league, but we can't take the 
chance of him hurting someone else with 
his wild stick." 

What makes this league unique, is the 
fact that this is a totally volunteer league 
run by the parents of the kids 
participating. The S25 entrance fee pays 
for the players shirts, sticks, pucks and 
trophies, all of which is returned to the 
players, in one form or another, by the 
end of the year, said LaRouche. 
(Continued on page 10) 



Residents honor veterans 



As' the haunting last strains of Taps 
floated over the hills of Antioch, the VFW 
Memorial Day services were concluded. 
Many Antioch residents came out to the 
ceremony at Hillside Cemetery to honor 
veterans. 

The VFW Post, the Antioch American 
Legion, and Cub Scout Troop 190 were 
present to pay tribute to the fallen 
servicemen of all wars. Despite the cool, 
windy weather, there was a good turnout 
for the services. 

The ceremony began at 11 a.m. at 
Orchard and Toft Streets. The participants 
placed a large wreath by the cannon. The 
services then proceeded to the Hillside 
Cemetery. 

After a brief graveside prayer, there was 
a rifle salute. At the conclusion of the 
ceremony. Taps was played by two 
Antioch High School students. 

For all who attended, it was a beautiful 
and moving ceremony. 




VFW holds Memorial Day services 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



For ALL the local news! Call (708) 223-81 SllfiSr^ 



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2 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, June 4, 1993 



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ounty 

AtA 

Glance 

Free swim Saturday 
for Vernon Hills 

VERNON HILLS— The long- 
awaited grand opening of the Vernon Hills 
Pool will be a reality Saturday. Officials 
promise free admission for all village 
residents and a special gift for the first 
700 people to arrive. The pool, located at 
635 N. Aspen, will be open daily 1 to 5 
p.m. and 6:30 to 9 p.m. through August 
22. 

Gurnee Days seeks 
bucks for fun 

GURNEE — Preparations for the annual 
Gurnee Days are being culminated. The 
theme this year is "Rompin' Stompin' 
. Gurnee Daze, Aug. 12-.15. Gurnee Days 
Corp., which organizes the event, is seek- 
ing donations. A goal of $20,000 has been 
set. To contribute, call Jeanne Balmes ai 
223-5596 or Gurnee Park Dist. 623-7788. 

Munclelein High to 
receive Blue Ribbon 

MUNDELEIN— They're celebrating 
at Mundelein High School. Word was 
received last week that the school has 
been selected to receive a Blue Ribbon 
Excellence in Education Award from the 
Department of Education. After the school 
submitted a 37-pagc application, a 
representative came for a site visit. 
School officials were fairly confident that 
the qualifications of Mundelein High 
School were impressive enough to 
warrant serious consideration. They were 
correct. 

Bond rating higher 
for Grayslake 

GRAYSLAKE — The Village of 
Grayslake is making progress when it 
comes to its bond rating.Grayslake now 
has an A 1 rating from Moody's, up from a 
rating of A. The rating is for the general 
obligation bonds, series 1993. Trustees 
agreed to refund the bonds and set up an 
escrow agrecmenl with American National 
"Bank and Trust Co. The interest rale is 
5.46 pcrcenL 

Wauconda principal 
retires after 31 years 

WAUCONADA— After working in 
Wauconda School District 118-for 31 
years, Robert Crown Grade School 
Principal Edward Hansen has decided to 
retire. Hansen was hired in 1962 as a 
fourth-grade teacher at Wauconda Grade 
School. Two years later he became the 
fifth-grade teacher and assistant principal 
and became principal in 1965 until 1984. 
He became the district's director of special 
eduction, and two years later became the 
Robert Crown Grade School principal, 
and later added the position of principal of 
the Kindergarten Center at the high school 
to his repertoire. "I love the kids and I 
am going to miss them tremendously," 
Hansen said, but after working double 
duty much of the time, he now wants to 
do other things besides work. ■ The 
kindergarten classes presented him with a 
tree planted in his honor in front of the 
school on May 27. 



Lakeland Newspapers' COUNTY NEWS 



Parents to treat 
Libertyville grads 

LIBERTYVILLE — Graduating 
seniors at Liberiyvi lie High School will 
recieve their diplomas June '11: at 
Northwestern University. Then ihey will 
come back to the high school one more 
time for their graduation bash, "Circus for 
the Stars." An alcohol-free and drug-free 
party sponsored by the parents, the event 
promises to be a night of fun, food and a 
lot of really cool prizes. 

Eat, shop for education 
at Lions annual market 

LAKE ZURICH— The Lake Zurich 
Lions are holding their 19th annual 
"market" on June 6 in Lion Fred Blau 
Park in Lake Zurich. More than 230 
antique and arts arid crafts exhibitors will 
be there from 10 a.m. until dusk. All the 
proceeds raised from the day long event 
will go towards the club's scholarship 
fund, said George Gottschalk, event co- 
chairman. 

Health fair opens 
Victory Memorial site 

GRAYSLAKE— A health fair will 
highlight grand opening of the Victory 
Medical Building at Walden Square in 
Grayslake. The event will be from noon to 
4 p.m. Sunday, June 6, Victory Medical 
Building is part of Victory Memorial 
Hospital and Victory Health Services. 
Walden Square is located at Center Su-cct 
and Atkinson Road. 

WW II veteran 
receives medals 

NORTH CHICAGO — A 68 year 
old WW II veteran received three military 
medals for overseas service he earned 
while stationed in the Philippines ncariy 
half a century ago at a formal dinner at tlie 
North Chicago Veterans of Foreign Wars 
post. Roosevelt Henley received the WW 
II Victory Medal, the Asiatic Pacific 
Campaign Medal and the American 
Campaign Medal, all of which were 
apparently lost by the Navy due to a mix- 
up in processing Henley's release papers. 

Buried treasure? 
Not this time! 

MUNDELEIN — A Mundelein 
resident who began innocently turning up 
soil for a garden turned up more than he 
bargained for when he dug up a hand 
grenade Monday. Mundelein police and 
members of iJie bomb disposal unit from 
Waukcgan discovered the grenade had been 
emptied and was not going to produce any 
fireworks. 

Heroes honored for 
rescue of young child 

WAUCONDA— In recognition of 
their heroic actions earlier this year, 
Wauconda Fire Captain Richard McGill 
and Libertyville resident Peg Ramson 
were presented with medals of honor for 
rescuing a little girl and preventing her 
injury. Both were involved with 
successfully stopping Michael Hoary's 
truck with his two and one-half year old 
daughter Allysoh hanging on the back on 
March 28. 

Profane language 
at town meeting 

LAKE VILLA— Lake Villa 
Township Highway Commissioner Jim 
Semmerling called Township Supervisor 
a whore in the last township meeting. 
Hanson, Township Attorney Paul 
Phillips and Trustee Sue Prochnow heard 
Semmeriirig make the remark. Phillips 
said Semmcriing also called him a whore 
in the meeting. Phillips said that it was 
one of the nicest things Semmerling 
called him in the meeting. Trustees Joe 
Hamm and Michelle Wolf didn't comment 
in the statement. Semmeriing didn't return 
phone calls from Lakeland Newspapers. 



North Chicago Schools 
raise $100,000 in pledges 

NORTH CHICAGO — Th^ 

"Partners in Progress: Save Our Schools" 
telethon has recicvcd close to 5100,000 in 
pledge money from several organizations. 
They include Abbot and Baxter 
Laboratories, Amoco Chemical Co., 
Goclitz Confictionary Co., Stone 
Container Corp., and the First Corinthian 
Missionary Babtist Church of North 
Chicago. "Wc arc a long way from SI 
million," said North Chicago Mayor 
Bobby E. Thompson, "that is our pledge, 
and we arc working really hard toward that 
goal." Thompson said that money 
received from' the telethon would help 
keep important learning programs intact 
in North Chicago Schools. 

Town Board create job 
for supervisor candidate 

LAKE VILLA^ The Lake Villa 

Township Board hired SURE Party 

candidate Karen Sullivan as operations 

manager at $24,000 a year. Township 

Supervisor Sue Hanson said there is no 

job description and that the SURE Party 

is trying to subvert her authority. SURE 

Party Trustees Jack Hamm said Sullivan 

was hired to insure programs on the 

SURE party platform such as senior 

programs and expanded township hours 

are implemented. The board passed the 

motion to hire Sullivan after the 

township attorney advised them that it 

was illegal to hire Sullivan the position 

of operations manager. Hanson said that 

the township usually creates a job before 

it hires someone. Hanson and Trustee Sue 

Prochnow accused the SURE Party 

trustees of discussing hiring Sullivan 

illegally. Hamm says he drafted the 

motion himself the night before the 

meeting. The attorney is checking into 

the legality of the hiring. 




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*Green Up.w...»»»M...21 
•Lakelife^...........,25 

♦Horoscbpe......M..*.u..31 

Hix)ssword PiizM;^^ 
•Clkss of !93^....;...».i..,iB 

•Obituari(5s..»i^.ii.««.33 , 
•GoodBegiknings.....59S 



Man gets run over 
by van after fight 

ROUND LAKE BEACH— A 

man was run over by a van on Monday 
night at 11:30 p.m. at Round Lake Beach. 
Kenneth Aamos is charged with aggra- 
vated battery and battery in the incident. 
According to the police report witnesses 
claim that they saw the left front tire of 
the van leaving the ground and rolling 
over the victim's back. Police found 
Arthur Peeples lying on the ground when 
they arrived. Peeples was treated and re- 
leased at the Condell Medical Center. 



FREE LUNCH OR DINNER AND I 
ESTATE PLANNING SEMINAR 




ZVI POLSTER 



Zvi Polster, attorney-at-law, will 
conduct an informative and enter- 
taining seminar, explaining how 
proper planning can save time and 
thousands of dollars. 



We will be appearing at 
the following locations: 

•GRAYSLAKE „ FREE LUNCH TTiureday, June 10 ■ 1:00 PM 

Whitney St Restaurant FREE DINNER Tlitusday, June 10 • 6:00 PM 

•GURNEE FREE LUNCH Thursday, June 17 • 1:00 PM 

Hampton Inn FREE DINNER Thureday, June 17 • 6:00 PM 



You should attend this seminar if your estate is in 
excess of $50,000 

♦ 

Avoid the lengthy and expensive probate process. 

Maintain privacy and control of your estate. 

Minimize estate taxes with an estate plan that 
includes a LIVING TRUST 

Avoid multiple probates if you own property in more 
than one state. 

Avoid guardianship or "Living Probate." 



For Information & Reservations Call 

(708) 223-9200 

SEATING LIMITED • RIvSERVATIONS REQUIRED 



Listen to Zvi Polster and Dave Allen on Radio 1220 WKRS at 
1 :00 P.M. Every Tuesday for "LAW TALK". 



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Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 3 



:< 



pETP^RaDE 



Itching dogs can mean 
signs of allergy, infection 



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AU dog owners have 
seen their dogs Itch and 
scratch. Some times they 
scratch a little, other times 
quite a bit At times the 
-poor dog itches so badJy, 
that he gets no rest and 
his skin develops sores 
and scabs. There is very 
little one can do to help. 

Well, there is help, in 



fact, a lot can be done to 
ease this kind of discom- 
fort The first thing is to 

find out the cause of itch- 
ing. Most of us immedi- 
ately think of fleas. Fleas 
do cause most of the itch- 
ing observed In dogs, but 
there are many other 
causes. As fleas cause skin 




PUPPIES FOR SALE 

Wouldn't you just love to cuddle up with one of these adorable, 
fluffy bundles of joy? Well, fiere's your cfiancel Four brand new 
babies born May 23 will be needing a loving home. Come take 
a look and you will fall in love. Watch your puppy grow from the 
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allergy, so do other fac- 
tors. 

During the summer 
and fall months espe- 
cially, plant origin parti- 
cles, pollens, spores and 
molds in the air can affect 
ones immune system and 

cause a reaction. This re- 
action in a person is 
known as hay fever. In 
dogs, skin becomes the 
target The wotst part of 
the season seems to be 
August and September. 
There are other causes of 
itching, such as infections, 
mange and others, so one 
should never make any 
assumptions. To make 
sure that proper care is 
given, ask your veterinar- 
ian to diagnose the prob- 
lem correctly. 
Progress in immunology 
allows us to determine 
sources of allergies from a 
single blood sample taken 
from the padent The n?xt 
step is then to desensitize 
the itching patient vnth 
preparations made espe- 
cially for him. 
Do not ignore an itch- 
ing dog. Itching is com- 
mon.'but is not normal 
and it is uncomfortable. 
Help is available and your 
pet deserves to be com- 
fortable. — by DR. 
KRZACZYNSKI 



*•. 



larns Cat Food 20# $19.99 
lams Chunk or Min. 
Chunk Dog Food 40# $22.99 
lams Puppy Food 40# $25.99 



Baby Iguanas $19.99 Farm Raised 

Domestic Bred Hand Fed Baby Birds 

[Yellow Nape Amazon $895.00 



Congo African Gray 
Blue 8l Gold McCaw 
Peach Front Conures 
Sun Conures 
Janday Conures 
Moustache Parakeet 
Bourke Parakeet 



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(708)336-2150 

OPEN MON.-FRI. 10 A.M.-9 P.M.; SAT. 10 A.M.-6 P.M.; 
I SUN. 11 A.M.-6P.M. r 




B.C. DOG TRAINING 

GROOMING AND PET SUPPLY 

"Wtiere we train you to train & care for your dog " 




Grooming 
Grand Opening Day 

June 7, 1993 

We groom ttiem all 
Large or small - canine or feline 

Puppy Day Care 
Grand Opening Day 

June 21 9 1993 

We take them all - large or small 

Puppies age 7 weeks to 16 weeks. Puppies receive 2 

snacks, luncli, and 2 play times along with outside 

elimination training during the course of a day. 

•SGROOMING BUCKSS- 



First Time 
Grooming Customers 



with this coupon 
good thru June 30, 1993 



We have expanded our retail iiours 

WE ARE OPEN 

Monday-Thursday Saturday 

10:30 am - 3:00 pm 7:00 am - 3:00 pm 
7:00 am - 9:30 pm 

We carry - BIL J AC, SOLID GOLD, lAIVIS, 

NATURE'S RECIPE, QUALITY CARE PLUS along 

with most cat & dog products. 

Our iiall is available for rental. We feature 3 4O'x50' 

AKC Rings for group or individual use. Stop by or 

call for current class schedules. 

WE OFFER: 

*Puppy Obedience/Socialization Class 

^Beginner Obedience Class 10 Weeks 

*Advanced Obedience Class 

*Competition Obedience Class 

*Expanded Conformation Class 

Jr. Showmanship, beginners and advanced 

^Agility class 



All our classes limited in size for greater attention. ASSISTANT 
TRAINERS are used In all classes for additional help. All 
I . $GRooMiNG BucKss-^ 1 exercjses are recapped on handouts for worklnQ at hoHoe. 

CALL (708) 566-1960/65 872 TOWER RD., MUNDELEIN, IL 



4]Lakeland Newifbapore 



( ■ 



Friday, June 4, 1993 



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PflRfiDE 



IProtect household pets from unplanned parenthood 



by DR. J, 

KRZACZYNSKI 

Gurnee Pet CUntc 

Most of us acquire an 
animal to share our home 
with us as a pet Certainly 
this is a very good way of 
life, with plenty of 
nourishing food, fresh 
' water, a diy and wann place 
to sleep and of course love 
and lots of affection. 

The pet responds to 

these favors by returning 

- his or her affection and by 

accqHing certain rules of 

socialization. Animals can 
Icam to control their 
behavior, not to soil your 
carpet or chew your 

belongings. The 
reproductive instincts, 
however, caiuiot be 
controlled. ; . 

Owners interested in 
breeding animals will put 



up with nuisances such as 
the less clean aspects of a 
female dog in beat, the 
nervousness and noisy 
behavior of a female 
roaming and the fighting of 

a tomcat or objectionable 
moimiing efforts of a 
mature dig. Their reward is 
successful reproduction of 
quality breed. Finding a 
home for a puppy or Hwen 
may be difficult No one 
knows how many arc bom 
in the United Stales each 
year, but the numbers are 
staggering. Wo know that 
there are well over 105 
million dogs and cats. 
Since there arc only 84 
million households in the 
country, increasing 
numbers of these animals 
are homeless. Shelters 
being overcrowded, these 
animals that cannot be 



placed in homes are 
humanely destroyed ^y. - 
Others die of starvation, 
disease, pr injury on the 

street Animal population 
is everyone's problem. 



If not interested in 
breeding, one has a choice 
of permanently protecting 
his or her pet from 
unplanned parenthood. By 
doing so, we can control all 




VI l: 




the uiMlesiied aspects of 
reproduction mentioned 
above, but above all, we 
contribute to curbing the 
sad overpopulation 
problem. 

The age to spay a female 
is about six months, before 
sexual maturity is reached. 
Males should be neutered at 
seven to eight months. 
Call your veterinarian for 
more details. 

Surgical sterilization, 
called "spaying" in a female 
and "castration" in a male is 
permanent way to control 



unwanted breeding. The 
result is a better pet, an 
animal who is owner 
oriented, happier and 
healthier, liie owner's life 
is made easier. 




For questions coficcming 
the health of your pet ask 
Dr. "K." Send questions to: 
Ask Dr. "K",c/o Lakeland 
Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, 
Grayslakc, EL 60030. 



# 



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CONSIDER ADOPTION... 
WHEN YOU WANT A PET! 

SOCIETT OF ST FRflNCIS 

dnimal Sh«lter 

Located 2 blocks West of 1-94 on n6tt\ Street In Bristol Wl 
One Mfte Nortti of Illinois State Line 

(414) 857-7260 

New Hours; Closed Mondays and Holidays 

Tuesday 11:00 -7:00 p.m. 

Wednesday - Friday 1 1 ;00 - 5:00 p.m. 

Saturday & Sunday 1 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. 




Help Curb Pet Over^Population 
Problems. 

Spay \w. 

or NecitQr 
Now!! 

Contact: 
Animal Protection 

P.O. Box 106 

Gurnee, IL 60031 

708-265-0333 



I HELPED SAVE A SWIALL LIFE TODAYI 

The Assisi Animal Foundation 

ONE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE... 

TOGETHER WE'LL MAKE A MIRACLE 

GIFTS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE 
NOT FOR PROFIT.,.VOLUNTEER 




Wodon'tdostroy homeless anlmaJBl ITiey live their 
full Uvea uncaged 11 not adopted. Wo spay and 
neuter, conduct a dynamic pet visliatlon/therapy 



firogramforttie 
or youna people and oner a spi 

THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELPI 



for young 
program 



rovlde education programs 
era special "pet retirement" 



Name. 



Address _ 
City, ST_ 
Zip Code 



Individual 

Membership $15 

Family Membership 

$20 

Donation $ 



I 

Please mall to: Assist Animal Foundation ' 

I P.O.B. 143 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 (815)455-9411 I 



PETS IN NEED 

Needs Your Helpl 

Following is a list of som0 
of ttie animals available for 
adoption: 

Long & short hair kittens, 6 
weeks old, Siamese cat, 
and other cats. Standard 
Schnauzer, Beagle, Lab 
Shepherd puppies, Great 
Dane. Australian 

Shepiierd, Yellow Lab, 
Lab Irish Setter, Shepherd, 
Gordon Setter, 

Staffordshire Terrier, 
Shepherd Collie, Akita 
Mix, 5 lb Maltese Mix. 
fglany other large & 
small dogsl 

Adopt from a shelter & 

receive your 

spay/neuter card. 

8e a rosponsiblo pel ownerl 

(815) PAT-1462 

Pets In Need 



I 



PET FOOD OUTLET 

You Supply The Pet. We'll Supply the Rest. 
Premium Food and Supplies 

Truckload Sale 
566-3321 

wy — 

June 26th 
June 27th 

$4.00 OFF 40 lb. 
$2.00 OFF 20 lb. 
$1.00 OFF 5-10 



SCIENCE DIET 







FREE T-Shirts/Coupons w/purchase featuring 

Manufacturers reps to answer questions lots of 

fun and savings . . . 

1776 Townline Rd. (Rt. 60) Mundelrin, IL 60060 



Freedom Fence 

Etectmnic Dog Containment System 




Keep your dog in 
your yard AND out 
of your garden (or 
wherever you 
choose). 



708/726-1100 



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LEASH & COLLAR 
DOG TRAINING 

Nationally Acclaimed Group Classes 

Chicagoland's Premier Puppy Course 

Accredited Private Counseling 

Conformation 

Over 15.000 Well-trained Graduates & 

Happy Owners 

Two convenient Locations 

Deer Held Grayslakc 

(708) 94^5-4^544 (708) 566-4^544 



fyk FOUR PAWS 

^7 TRAINING CENTER 

"Positive Training With Positive Results" 

All training methods me not alike. Come visit us during classes and 
observe a ditterent approach to dog training. Our methods utilize food, 
enthusiasm and praise, and exercises are broken down into pieces both 
dogs and owners can manage. We have classes for puppies and older 
dogs, and for all levels of obedience competition training. For more 
inlormation please give us a call. 

COURSE gPHEPMLE NEXTTCRM STARTS 

General Obedience: 

'niu.6:30Pllor July 8 

SH.IOAU JurMl2 I 

Thu. 7:30 PU or Jutye 

Sat. 11 AM JunBl2 
Thu. 8:30 PU July 8 



•Puppy K)nd«rgartMi • 
•5«slcOb«dlanc4'l> 



•Basic Ob«dlencaU- 

Comt)etHlon Claases: 

•Novk»(CDTltla)- Uon.TPUorThu.S AM July 5 or 8 

•Op«n (CDX THki) • Hon. 8 PH or Thu. 10 AH JulySorS 

20970 While Road * Antloch, IL 60002 • (708) 838-0523 



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Fflday. Juno 4, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 5 



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I.IPSERVICE 

IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



GET "IT" OFF YOUR CHEST (708)223-8073 




Lipservice is a phone-in column presented as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no 
claim to the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland 
Newspapers does not claim the content or the subject matter 
as fact, but as the personal opinion of the caller. iMkeland 
Newspapers reserves the right to edit copy or to refrain from 
priming a message. Call in at 223-8073 and leave your 
message 24-hours a day. Although the call is anonymous, 
please leave your village name. 

Ulterior Motive 

No wonder Jim Fields wants the riverboat in. Isn't it 
true he has some family members with their resumes in 
there? 

More power 

We keep hearing about the need for power in the Lake 
Zurich area. Now that summer is here the power outages 
will be more frequent. When is the village board going to 
give Com Ed the go ahead to build the new substation. 
We need more power. 

Whatever Happened 

What has happened to all of the programs Dr. 
Palombi initiated in District 41? In less than a year, 
the Lake Villa School Board was a helping hand of our 
interim superintendent to destroy all of the programs. 
Maybe that's why they hired her in the first place. She 
had the "no"-how to destroy everything. 

Out of Service 

I am from Antioch and have a big complaint It is 
Saturday night and once again, the cable is out. It has 
been out for over two and a half hours! I am not going 
to pay them for the time it is out. You do not pay for 
services that are not rendered. 



I'd like the EPA to conrie out and test them, since I am 
sure they are way too loud. 

Lack of Support 

This is to the Lake Villa teacher who never supported 
the new superintendent. If you support children the way 
you supported her, I have to question your 
professionalism. 

Highway Robbery 

Let's impeach Clinton now. We cannot afford any 
more taxes. It is highway robbery. 

Nice Ad 

I think Lisa R's back page advertisement thanking 
people was very nice. I think the ARC people would 
have done a lot better by asking her to come to the 
Antioch Township Board meeting. After all, she is 
related to one of the trustees. 

No More Tax 

I just heard on the radio that President Clinton and 
Congress want to raise our taxes again. The spending 
cuts were defeated. The cigarette tax was defeated. My 



husband and I live on $40,000 a year. Moie tax will 
kill us. Congressmen make $130,000 a year. They 
sure aren't worth it 

Mad Wife 

I am married to a Fox Lake policeman and have a few 
things to say. Those of you who complain arc 
probably the same people who get tickets for failing to 
have Fox Lake stickers, even though they arc free. If 
they get an address wrong, it may mean you were at 
fault. Maybe you did not speak clearly. When 
someone is breaking into your house think about 
calling them incompetent fools. 

Don't Look 

I met my wife at Sandy and Gwen's about a year ago. 
I should say my former wife. What a tramp. Stay 
alone guys, it is a lot easier. 

Root Of Problems 

Hey, Lipservice callers and Lakelife writers to the 
editor, the real problem is your hatred. Whether it is 
towards dogs, cats, other races, or disabled persons. 
That is the real problem that needs fixing. 
(Continued on page 19) 



Forgot A Spot 



A lot of credit should go to Fremont Library in 
Mundelein. They did a beautiful job painting and doing 
everything nice. But, the men's washroom is a 
disgrace. Did you run out of paint? Plus the doors are 
a mess and the toilet doesn't flush. I wonder what the 
ladies room looks like. It is too bad that they can do 
such a beautiful job on the outside and forget something 
as important as the bathroom. 



Why Ask Why 



If we have such an honorable mayor, why does Fox 
Lake only have one funeral home in town? Why is he a 
dictator in the town meetings? 

Earache 

The Antioch Rescue Squads sirens are a real nuisance 
if you live in the town. They actually hurt your ears! 




NOTICE 



An Invitation Is extended to public 
bodies, attorneys, businesses and private 
citizens to use Lakeland Newspapers for 
convenient publication of LEGAL 
NOTICES required by the state of Illinois. 

3 quick and economical ways: 

• CALL Chirls Kenyon 

(708)223-8161 

• FAX (708)223-8810 

• MAIL Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

Deadline: Tuesday at 11 a.m. 
Published Thursday 

We're here to servel 




Read 
About 

Athletes 

I Who 
Don't Have 




Contracts 



No multi-millionaires here. These kids play for the love of the game, and you 
love every minute of it. And with Lakeland Newspapers you can read all about 
these local athletes. Because every week we bring you local sports coverage 
that detaUs the passion and excitement these kids have for the games they play. 
And we're in the process of expanding our local sports news, because our goal 
is to be the complete source for news and information on all your local sports 
activities; So pick up a Lakeland Newspaper, and keep up with the athletes who 
really aren' t in it for the money. 



' 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



A local fan's source for 
more complete sports. 



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6 Lakefand Newspapers 



Friday. Jun« 4. 1993 



. • W 4 M P » te« X if « » «> H « n M « H tt « KM U « 



Holiday ends 
with death for 
Rte. 12 traveler 

by THOMAS STEVENS 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Charges have been filed against a 
Wonder Lake woman in the death of a 
Chicago woman after a Memorial Day 
accident on Rle. 12 near Fox Lake. 

Carole J. Rieglcr, 49, of Chicago, was 
pronounced dead at 9:10 p.m.at Northern 
Illinois Medical Center in McHenry of 
injuries suffered in the crash. She was not 
wearing a scatbelL 

According to Lake County Sgt. 
Vernon Hoch, Lisa A. Coylc, 28. of 2908 
Walnut Ave., was charged with reckless 
homicide, failure to show insurance and 
driving without a scatbell in connection 
with a three car accident on Rte. 12, west 
of State Park Rd at 5:22 p.m. on May 31. 

Police reports slated that Coyle's car 
apparently veered out of the west bound 
lane and entered the cast bound lane of 
traffic, striking Ricglar's car, which 
caused Coyle's car to rotate clockwise. 
Coyle's car finally rested on lop of a car 
driven by Craig P. Andersen, 40, of 
Rolling Meadows. Andersen was U-eatcd 
and released from NIMC, according to a 
hospital spokesman. 



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Lakeland Newspapers 




Science Alliance 

Antloch Community High School sophomore Dave 
Lawrence helps fifth-graders Nick Kocinski and Cassidy 
melt glass tubes into figures. In the Science Alliance 



program, high school kids help grade school students 
learn science. — Photo by Gene Gabry 



ACHS names honor grads, students ready for big day 



Anlioch Community High School 
used its annual Honors night celebration 
to recognize the school's most 
outstanding students, especially its 
graduating seniors. 

The special event held in* the ACHS 
Auditorium, provided the forum to present 
awards and scholarships to the students 
before school ends this week. 

Commencement for graduating seniors 
is scheduled for June 6 at 2 p.m. in the 
school's North Gym. The traditional 
ceremony will be crisp, according to 
Steve Wapon, the school's student 
activities vice-principal. 



Senior Class President Erin 
McCallum and Student Council President 
Colleen Keating are expected to address 
their classmates during the graduation 
ceremony. ACHS will recognize Cum- 
Laudc graduates as their names are 
announced during the graduate's roll call. 

Seniors, to be eligible for Cum-Laude 
graduation status, must earn a 5.0/5.0 
accumulative grade point average. The 
Cum-Laude graduate is the highest 
academic honor presented to an ACHS 
seniors. 

Eligible honor graduates, since the 
final list will not be announced until aflcr 



student fmals, are: Thomas Albert, Lisa 
Alberts, Shane Anion, Patricia Apostal, 
Joshua Bakk, Charlotte Bcrgcr, Krtstcn, 
Bcmabc, Megan Bivona, Kelly Bobcr, Erika 
Bochm, Matt Bogcnschultz, Erin Bonalcs, 
Christopher Braccy, Justin Calabrcsc, Brany 
Cashmere, Roberta Cziczo, Mark Davidson, 
Jennifer Dunklau, James Elfcring. Betty 
Eng, Deborah Funk, Paula Galinis, Elizabeth 
Goodman, Laurel Gormley, Stephanie 
Gorskt, Lon Grohs, Sheri Haggland, 
Kathrinc Harris, John Harting, Amy 
Hausman, Carrie Hillcr, Carrie Holbo, 
Thomas Hovcy, Steven Johnson, Alexandra 
Kairis, Jeffrey Kchrcr, Jason Killgrove, 
Laura Kocck, Benjamin Krenkc, Mitzi Krusc, 
Melissa Lamb, Michelle Lee, Karin Licbcr, 



Adam Lips, Amy Litchfield, Elizabeth 
Maloncy, Amanda Masek, Erin McCallum, 
Brian McGuirc, Kelly Miller, Pauline Miosi, 
Daniel Nelson, David Ncul, Melissa 
Olenick, Hideko Osoria, Kimberly Patchak, 
Stephanie Patti, Todd Paulus, Joann 
Pecoraro, Adam Phillips, Krisicn Picrson, 
Amy Prochow, Crystal Rommen, Angelo 
Ronconc, Paul Ruscko, Lisa Salonen, Carrie 
Saunders, Douglas Scopcl, Mark 
Simbrowski, Charlcne Smith, Jason 
' Smolarchuk, Jen Soulak, Mary Anne Stack, 
Joann Tamowski. Nicole Troedel, Michael 
Vavrina, Danielle Voss, Victoria Waisi 
Karin Wallbcrg, Joan Wcrhanc, Jennifer 
Wilke, Heather Wright, Megan ZcUcr and 
Raymond Zcllmcr. 



■ • 

Safety measures can help prevent child from drowning 



by THOMAS STEVENS 

Laifcland Newspapers 

Fox Lake and Antloch area families 
arc breathing a sigh of relief after a three- 
year- old youth almost drowned after 
walking off the family's concrete 
brcakfront this week. 

Quick reactions and good common 
sense saved Jeffrey Collins Jr's. life when" 
he fell into the water in a Peiitc Lake 
channel and was pulled out by his parents. 

Fox Lake Capt. Erik Ullbcrg and 



Watershed meeting 

The next meeting of the Sequoil Creek 
Watershed Citizens' Advisory Committee 
will be held on Wednesday, June 9, at 7 
p.m. in the Antioch Township Hall. 99 
Hwy. 173, Anlioch. The public is invited 
to attend. For additional information, 
contact die Lake County Soil and Water 
Conservation District at 223-1056. 



Antioch Rescue Squad Lt. Tim Osmond 
have thoughts of their own on how to 
prevent, what they call, a common 
occurence every summer. 

Osmond and Ullbcrg said that their 
respective fire departments and rescue 
squads receive several call a summer from 
disunught parents who believe their child 
has drowned. 

Both rescue veterans believe the best 
defense against a repeat of the near disaster 
last week is to closely supervise young 
children when they arc near the water. 

"Strict supcrvison, especially near the 
water is the key," said Ullbcrg. "Keep 
your eyes and cars open for possible 
trouble when your kids arc near the 
water." 

Ullbcrg adds that water safety training, 
even for young children, is a must for 
those who live near a body of water or 
own a deep swimming pool. 

"Children need to understand the 
dangers of Uic water and what lo do if they 



get into u-oublc," said Ullberg. 

Osmond adds that all parents should 
know CPR and those ihat don't should 
seek classes immediaiciy. Both the 
Anlioch Rescue Squad and Fox Lake Fire 
Department conduct CPR classes semi- 
annually. 

Another problem area Osmond points 
out Is Uiat some people wait too long to 
call the rescue squad or fire department 
when trouble arises. 

"Don't be afraid to call the rescue 
squad if something happens," said 
Osmond. "When you are talking about a 
drowning victim, minutes, even seconds 
count. Then sooner we are there, the 
belter off the victim is, even if it is not 



serious. , > .; 

However one of the easiest ways to 
prevent drowning by small children 
playing near the water is to secure their 
lives wiUi the use of a life vest. 

"Always have a safety vest on when 
you arc on or near the water," said 
Osmond. "They even make them for very 
small people with Popcyc or other 
characters on Uicm." 

Finally, Osmond and Ullberg said to 
use the buddy system when playing on or 
near the water. 

"That young boy's life was saved 
because he was playing with a friend 
when he fell into the water, which meant 
help came quickly," said Osmond. 



Bandleader could face 
14 for sex with student 



Lakeland Newspapers 



(USPS 027-080} 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded IHHG 

Ottice o( Publication: 30 Soum WTiilney St., Qraysiake, IL 
60030. Rytno (708) 223-8161. 

Published weekl/, second dau poatage paid at QrayalakQ, 
IL 60030. 

Mail Subscription Ratos: M6.50 Per Yoar by Mail paid In ad- 
vafKe In Uke, Cool< Konosha and McHenry CounUos; olie- 
wtvera '22,00 Por Yoar by Mall paid in advaiKe. 

Postmaslof: Sond address changes to Antioch Nbws- 
Repofiof, 30 Sootti Whltnoy Sirooi. P.O. Box 268, Orays- 
lako. Illinois 60030. 

(708)223-8161 



Anlioch News-Reporter Vernon Hilts News 
Lake Zurich Enterprise Round Lake News 
Lake Villa Record Wauconda Leader 

Mundelein News LIbertyvllle News 

Grayslake Times Llndenhurst News 

Fox Lake Press North Chicago Tribune 

Gumee Press Warren-Newport Press 

M.R. SCHROEDER 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

PubttstiBt/Ptesident . 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

Gonotai Manager 



JLLDtPASQUALE 
JO DAVIS 

kCOJtrqUy 



eOB SCHROEOER 
D/aiiian H;f 

SNAflONZASAOL 

CnpcEiMntl^r 



ANN y. ROBERTS 
ELtZABEfflEBERT 



by THOMAS STEVENS 

Liikcland Newspapers 

A 25-year-old former Antioch 
Community High School bandleader faces 
up 10 14 years in prison for admitting he 
had sex with a 15-ycar-old student last 
year. 

James Peterson pleaded guilty to a 
reduced charge of aggravated criminal 
sexual abuse on May 27 in an agreement 
with proscculcrs presented to Lake 
County Circuit Judge Henry Tonigan. 

The former assisiani band leader at 
ACHS, who resigned his position with 
the school in January after charges were 
filed, admitted lo having sex with the girl 



in his apartment in Salem, Wis. and at 
the home of a friend of the girl, in Round 
Lake Beach, during the past school year. 
Peterson faces similar charges in a 
Kenosha court next week. 

According to Assistant State's 
Attorney Steve SchcUcr, Uic plea bargain 
was offered lo Peterson in order lo save 
Ihc victim the trauma and humiliation of 
having to participate in a trial. 

Schellcr did not comment on what 
kind of sentence he would be asking for 
when Peterson returns lo court on June 
28. Widi the reduced charges, Peterson is 
eligible for a shorter jail lime, work 
rclciisc programs, and probation. 



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Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



Lakeland New»papers 7 



i 



Tiny graduates march on at Camp 




m 



Special program 

The Annual Camp 
Crayon Spring Pro- 
gram/Graduation was per- 
formed to a very large audi- 
ence, All of the children did 
a marvelous job perfonning 
and singing. Special men- 
tion goes to our "Down By 
The River" quintet— Jenny 
Schrieber, Tricia Pringle, 
Eddie Lindstrom, Kaite 
Turner and Missy Carroll. 
Also little Meaghan Shana- 
han did a great job singing 
two beautiful solos — "Oh 
What A Beautiful Morning" 
and "Start All Over Again." 
The tears flowed freely as 
the tiny graduates marched 
out in their red and white 
caps and gowns. 

Special thanks are ex- 
tended to the parents for 
their help and cooperation 
throughout the year. Special 
recognition r^nd thanks to 
Carol Todd, Parks Depart- 
ment Director, for not only 
attending the Wednesday 
program, but also for help- 
ing us during and afterwards 
with supervision at our pic- 
nic outing. 

Newly elected Mayor 
Shincflug took time out of 
her busy schedule to attend 
the Thursday morning pro- 
gram. It was unly an honor 
having her in the audience. 
Donna Schmehl (Miss 
Donna) was able to arrange 
her new job schedule to at- 
tend the TTiursday afternoon 
performance to show con- 



tinued love and support of 
the children. 

Thank you, Mr. Garcia, 
Mr. Guido and Mrs. Turner 
for helping with the video 
camera. Special thanks to 
Karen Gieser (Kacey Siwu- 
la's grandma) and Fran 

Hometown 
Goodies 




Adelizzi (Paige Majewski's 
grandma) for helping get the 
little ones into their caps 
and gowns. Karen Georg- 
son, our hand-made name 
pms were great and we wore 
them with pride and love 
during all three programs. 
Thanks to the children and 
parents who presented us 
with special end of the year 
gifts. The hand-made name 
cards created by the children 
were beautiful. 



Last, but not least, 
Miss Marie was very ex- 
cited and even slightly ner- 
vous to see Sue Haley 
(Miss Sue) in the large au- 
dience of visitors. Miss Sue 
worked at Camp Crayon 
when Marie Brausam first 
started ten years ago. It is 
always heart wanning see- 
ing old friends. Sue's ap- 
pearance at the Thursday 
morning program made it 
even more memorable. 

Incidentally, the gradu- 
ates will be listed in next 
week's column. 
Beauty pageant 

Once again the Antioch 
Parks and Recreation Dept. 
will be sponsoring the an- 
nual Miss and Little Miss 
Antioch Pageants. The dates 
of the contest are Friday, 
June 25 for Miss Antioch 
and Sunday, June 27 for 
Little Miss. The entry dead- 
line is Friday, June 11 at 5 
p.m. Call Carol Todd at 
395-2160 for further infor- 
mation. 

I know a beautiful 18 
year old, with a gorgeous 
smile, that I would love to 
see enter. You know who 
you aa and I would be hon- 
ored to sit in the audience 
and cheer you on. Go for it, 
and call me after you regis- 
ter. 

Awards night 

As a school board 
member, I had an occasion 
to attend the annual Grass 
Lake School junior high 



awards night. It was truly a 
memorable evening. Many 
students were on hand to re- 
ceive awards for academic 
achievement, effort, music, 
art and sports. The audito- 
rium was beautifully deco- 
rated with a variety of the 
students' art work. 

As I browsed through 
the collection, I was drawn 
to a beautiful "Panda Bear" 
by Tami Edelman, a life 
like "Chipmink" by Jenny 
Cardis, a "Seal" by Teri 
Mozal and an "Eagle" by 
Steve Franzen. I did this 
from memory, kids, and I 
hope I got it right. 

Each year the teachers 
pick two eighth graders to 
receive the "Citizenship 
Award." This year the spe- 
cial honor went to Sandy 
Webel and Eric Schullz. 
Principal, Ginny Mann, 
was very proud to be on 
hand to congratulate every- 
one and introduce the recipi- 
ents of the many honor roll 
plaques. 

The grand finale of the 




Paul Harris Fellows 

Antioch Rotary inducted Paul Harris Fellows, from left, Ralpti Anlonelli, Larry 
Bersle, Robert J. Schneider, and Rev. Charles E. Milter. Paul Harris Fellows 
donate $1 ,000 which goes to charity .--Photo by Gene Gabry 




LookiNq For SoMEikiNq Unjoue & DisTJNCTivE? 



Fine Art 

•Sculpture ^— 

•Jewelry 

•lit House Graduate 

Geinologist 
• Vii rict}' of Utt iqite' 

Intportetl Gift Items 



EASY TO FIND IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN SALEM 

North on Rt. 83 to Salem 

8321 Antioch Rd. (Rt. 83) • Salem, Wl • 414-843-4209 




evenmg was the announce- 
ment of the class salutato- 
rian and valedictorian. 

Superintendent, Dr. 
Ruth Bill, was honored to 
step to the podium to pre- 
sent tliese two highest 
awards. Before doing so, she 
reminded everyone that 
these chosen students would 
be giving special speeches 
at graduation. As the names 
were disclosed and the stu- 
dents stepped forward to re- 
ceive their plaques, the au- 
dience rose with applause. 
Congratulations to everyone 
on a job well done and extra 
special congratulations to 
Cynthia Jones, the class 
salutatorian and Paul Grob, 
Hie class valedictorian, 

I will see you at gradua- 
tion and I know both of 
your speeches will be fan- 
tastic. 
Happy birthday 

In just a few short days 
all of the area schools will 
be starting the summer re- 
cess time. This means that 
even more children will be 



; 1 

put and about during the day 
time, walking, riding bicy- 1 
cles, roller skating, etc. Due 
to the absence of sidewalks 
in most rural areas, some of 
the children may be engag- 
ing in these activities on 
the back roads, etc. Always 
drive carefully and even 
more so this time of year 
when the roadways arc 
shared by many. 

It is also time for my 
monthly birthday list. A 
very Happy June Birthday 
wish is extended to Rich 
Cheterbok, Danny Clarke, 
Leslie Collins, Laura Fal- 
cone, Heidi Gwinn, Craig 
Hancock, Jake Harkness, 
Janet Harrison, John 
Kasprzak, Korin Knutson, 
Greg Laube, ArianaNeuner, 
Darlene Olenick, Marlene 
Olsen, Sr., Bill Parenti, 
Christopher Schaller, Bertha 
Schmehl and Justin Ward. 

Enjoy you summer, 
stop and smell the roses in 
your lives, be careful and 
stay happy. 




Creative writers 



The winners in the Antioch Community High School Creative Writing contest 
were announced. Front, from left, Katie Fettig, Tricia Apostal, Stephanie 
Patti, Rebecca Liddle. Back, fromleft, Aaron Bell, Matt DeMartini, Audrey 
Forth, Dr. Michael Radakovich. Not pictured: Genevieve Osmond. 



Fathers role to be discussed 



"The Father's Role in 
Supporting Breastfeeding" 
will be the topic discussed 
at the Thursday, June 10 
meeting of the State Line 

La Lecbe League held at 
9:30 a.m. at 985 Harvest 
Dr., Antioch. Also dis- 
cussed will be the signs of 
readiness for solids, nutri- 
tion for baby and weaning. 

La Leche League is a 
nonprofit, international or- 
ganization which has been 
providing up to date, medi- 
cally approved information 
for 36 years. Instruction and 
encouragement is shared by 
trained mothers who also 
have personal experience. 

Any woman interested 
in breastfeeding information 
is welcome as is her baby. 

The opportunity to share 
the concerns as well as the 



joys of motherhood is rea- call the breastfeeding help 
son enough to attend, lines at 395-5288 or 
For more information (414)862-2709. 



New Arrival 



Tyler James Heischberg 

A son, Tyler James, wjj bonr April 19 at Lake Forest Hospital lo 
Kathy and Jim Hcischt>crg of Antioch. He has two brothers, Jeffrey, 6 
and Jonathon, 3. Grandparents are Barbara and Dan Scholwin of 
Lindenhurst, Blanche Warden of Inglcsidc, Edward Heischberl of Si. 
Charles. Great grandmothers are Evelyn Zatoudek of Chicago, 
Catherine Heischberl of Fu Lauderdale, Fla. 



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8 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, 4.un« 4.'^^ 



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by MARY FOLEY 
Lakeland Newspapers 

A benefit for Community Action Now 
(CAN) will be held on June 27 at 5 p.m. 
Village of Antioch residents should 
receive their invitations in the mail. 
Antioth Township residcntj; and others 
wishing to attend can obtain tickets ai 
any of the local banks in Antioch. 
The event will be formal dress-up affair, 
however, "black tie is option" said Frank 
DiMarco. DiMarco is the owner of 
DiMarco's Restaurant and the event's 
organizer. Tickets are SI 00. 

The event begins at DiMarco's 
Restaurant with champagne and 
appetizers. Live music, provided by Rob 
Finlcy and Carl Heltgcist will be featured 
in front of the restaurant. 
, "An Evening With Cole Porter" will 
follow at the PM&L Theater next door. 
This will be a professional producttori 
with many well-known local artists. 
Champaign and Italian deserts will be 
featured at intermission. 

CAN is a community group dedicated 
to the improvement of the downtown 
Antioch area. The group was organized 
in 199L 

Library offers 
summer program 

The Antioch Public Library's 
'Amazing Book Capers' summer reading 
program will run June 21 through Aug. 5 
for children 3 lo 13 years old. 

Registration will be conducted until 
June 15. A current Antioch library card is 
required to participate. A signer will be 
made available for children who need 
communication in sign language. Three 
weeks advance notice is needed. 



Diplomas 



(Continued from page 1) 

school readiness training. In addition, 
there is both a social service component 
and parenting services. 

While the program receives funding 
from the Federal government, thai 
funding does not cover much. Many of 
the extras arc provided through donations. 
The program is always looking for adult 
volunteers. 

Parents interested in learning more 
about the program and eligibility 
requirements should call the Waukegan 
office at 244-0043. 




Indoor picnic 

The 885 Civic Club held its annual 
picnic for children with disabilities. 
Due to rain, the picnic was moved 
Inside to the Antioch Fire 
Department. An Indian does a 'go 
away' rain dance for kids. At right, 
standing, Joe Lafleur, civic Club; 
Ed Jergens, Worshipal Master 
Antioch Mason Lodge; Eva 
Hawryluk, Worthy Matron Antioch 
Easter Star. Second row, Matt 
Witwicki and Krista Miller. Sitting in 
front, from left, Jason Combs, 
Jesse Pye, Tami Klinger, Kereana 
Chlopek, and Cassi Adkjns. 



Photos by Gene Gabry 



'»> 



DiMarco *s prepared for outdoor cafe request 



by MARY FOLEY 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Frank DiMarco, owner of DiMarco's 
Restaurant on Main Street in Antioch is 
prepared to present a request for an 
outdoor cafe to the Antioch Village Board 
next week. 

Initially, the restaurant sought 
permission for the cafe in early May. 



However, the Board had a number of 
issues that needed to be addressed first. 
Insurance questions, barrier problems, and 
municipal ordinances needed to be 
evaluated. 

"We've been okayed by the Lake 
County Health Dcparuncni and we are all 
set with the insurance" said DiMarco. 
"We are ready." 



Currently, there are umbrella tables on 
the sidewalk, in front of the restaurant. 
NeverlJieless, food and beverages cannot 
be served until the rcstiiurant gets the 
okay from the village board. 

Originally, the purpose of the tables 
and chairs were to allow diners a place to 
sit while waiting for an available table. 




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Gracelind Baptlat Ctiurch. 256 Ida St., Aniiodi, II. 
Sunday School 1 1 a.m., Morning Wofship 1 1 a.m., 
Sunday Evening 7 p.m. Robert Wlfiamu. Paslor. 

RrX Church of Christ, Sclonllal & Reading Rm., Rie. 
173 and Harden. Amioch. Phono (708) 395-1 196. Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Servico 10.'30a.m. Wednesday, 
flpm. 

Calvary Baptlal Church, 554 Partway, Phono (70B) 
395-3393. Sunday School 10a.rTt., Sunday Worship 
11a.fa and 7p.m, Pastor, Rov. Lloyd G. Moss. Jr. 

SL Ignatlut EpIacopsI, 977 Main SI., Phone (708) 
395-0652. Low Mass 7:30 a.m.. High Moss 9i» a.tTU 
Sunday School & Nursery 9:30 a.m. 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church Tillany Rd. Phone 

(708) 395-4117. Sunday School 930 aj.T. Sunday 
Worship 6:15 aia and 11 a.rn.. Chiidron's Church 11 
a.m. Nuraory both sorvlcos. Awana Club, 6:30 p.ni 
Wodnocday 

5L Slophan Lutheran Church, Hlllsldo & Rio. 59 Phone 

(709) 395-3359. Sunday Worship. B and 10:30 a.m. 
Church Schwjl 9;15 a.m., Sunday Rov. Chatlos E. Miller, 
Pasio.'. 

Christian Life Fellowship As>cml>tics of Cod Church. 
41625 Doop Lake Rd., Aniloch. Phono (708) 39 56 572. 
Sunday School (oil ages) 9 a.m.. Sunday Morning 
Worship 10 a.m., Children's Church 10 am., Sunday 
Evening V/orRhlp 6:30 r-r., Wednesday Worship 4 



Children's Pfogram 7 am., Tues. Worren's KoDovshlp & 
Bbia Siudy 9 - 1 130 a.m. Jo» Snjssaly. Pastor, 

Faith Evangelical Lutheran, 1275 Main SL Phone 
(708) 395-1600. Sunday Worship B & 1030 a.(TU, 
Sunday School 925 a.m., Mon. 7 p.m. Rev. Darald 
Gruen, Rev. Gregory Hermanson, Pastors. Christian 
Day School (708) 395-1664. 

Millburn Congregational United Church ol Chrlal. 
Grass L*o Rd. at Rio. 45 Phone (708) 356-5237. 
Sunday service 10 am. Childran's program 10 a.m. Rev. 
Paul R.Msliier. Pastor. 

United Methodiat Church ol Antioch. 848 Main Sl 
Phone (708) 395- 1259. Worship at 830 A.rn, & 10:45 am. 
Church School - classes lor all ages. 930 am. The Rev. 
Kurt A. GamSn. Pastor. 

SL Peter** Church, 557 W. Lake St„ Anfoch. Phone 
(708) 3950274. MiBSOs weekdays, 7:154 Bam.. 
Sunday630, 8, 9:30. 11 am. 4 12:1Sp.ni. Saturday 530 
p.m. Pastor Rev. Faihor Lawrence Hanley. 

Chain of Lakea Community Bible Church. 23201 W. 
Grass Lake Bd., Anlkxh, Phono (708) 838-0103 Sunday 
Worship: 8:15 and 10:45. Sunday School: 9:45. Children's 
Church: 10.45. Youth. Women's, Awana & Smalt Group 
mInlstrios.Sonktr Pastor, Rev. Don Sweeting. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Mlasourt Synod}, 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rts. 58 & 132), Lake Villa. (708) 
356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:1 5 & 10:45 a.m.; Sunday 
School (3 and up] ar>d Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Rev. John 
ZflUmer, Pastor, Chrislian PreschooL 




Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



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Friday, June 4, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 9 



Iceless hockey 



Letter to the Editor 



(Continued from page 1) 

"There are no practices or workouts," 
said LaRouchc. "The kids just show up, 
play and go home. That is it." 

The league last year also refused the 
entrance of a child with cerebral palsy and 
another Down's syndrome victim on the 
same safety concerns without complaint 
from those parents, according to 
LaRouchc. 

However, the Brankin's continue to 
pursue their child's dream to play iceless 
hockey because he wants to play. 

"He says, 'Why won't the men let me 
play'," said Donna Brankin. "You don't 
know how much that hurts to hear him 
say that." 

Iceless hockey coach Paul Phillips, 
who serves as the village attorney for 
Lindcnhurst, said the legal issue here is 
'Do the handicapped have the right to 
participate?' 



"If the kid can perform, lei the child 
play," said Phillips in a telephone 
interview. Phillips added that the schools 
got involved when they heard about the 
conciplaint against the league and wished 
to avoid a lawsuit against them. 

"The schools don't want to get 
involved with this," said LaRouche. "1 
don't blame Uiem." 

Antioch District 34 and Lake .Villa 
District 41 refused to comment on the 
iceless hockey issue. 

Both Brankin and LaRouche hope to 
find a solution to the crisis before the 
league begins sign-up in November. 

"I hope a solution can be reached," 
said Brankin. "I never wished to halt or 
close the league, l just want to get PaUick 
an opportunity to play." 

LaRouchc seemed just as upbeat about 
a possible solution in the next few weeks. 



for the latest information.. station. This Is also the 

The second sound is an noon whistle. 

oscillating up and down 3.. Rescue Squad Whis- 

tone indicating an air mid tics — A low pitched oscil- 

,..,,.„ ^ . or nuclear attack telling lating whistle blowing for 

!."„^.I?°i^;L!;il!.?' ^'^^ people 10 take cover. approximately two minutes. 

""*'"" 2, Fire Whistle — A high Blows 24 hours a day for 

pitch oscillating tone for 45 the same purpose as previ- 

seconds. This whistle blows ously stated. 

from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily If a particular whistle is 

to notify firefighters who bothering you, please direct 

may be doing jobs where your complaint to the 

pagers cannot be worn and 

to indicate to the public to 

be on alert for volunteers 



Different sirens 

Editor: 

Recently people have 
called regarding the sirens 
in Antioch. I will tr 
a short explanation. 

There are three whistles 
in Antioch for various pur- 
poses as follows. 

1. ESDA or Storm 
Warning — ^Whistle sounds 
like air raid. sirens in old 
war movies. 

This whistle is tested 



monthly on the first Tues- making their way to the 
day at 10 a.m. If a storm is 
approaching and a tornado 



proper organization. 

Charles P. Maplethorpe 
Honorary Fire Chief 
Antioch Fire Dept. 



warning is issued, a long 
four minute straight tone is 
sounded telling the public 
to turn on the radio or TV 



PUBUC NOTICE 
COUNTY ZONING NOTICE 
STATEOFILLINOiS 

COUNTY OF LAKE S #2922 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given to all persons in the 
town of Antioch, Lake County, Illinois, that a public hear- 
ing will be held on Monday, June 28, 1993, at 1:30 p.m., 
in the Antioch Township hall, 99 Highway 173, Antioch, 
IL 60002. relative to a request for the following variations 
from the requirements of the Lake County Zoning 
Ordinance, Chapter One, for the purpose of constructing 
a 'Group Dwelling Residential Use' on property that is 
presently zoned Suburban (S). 1) Variation from Section 
4401. F.5. titled "Replacement of Woodland Credit" to 
allow for woodland reforestation on off-site property 
owned by the Lake County Forest Presetye District; and 
2) Variation from Section 5900 titled "Required Sewer 
and Water Services' which requires connection to com- 
munity sewerage system meeting all requirements of 
Stale law and County ordinances for all uses in the 
Suburban (S) District except for single family dwellings to 
allow the installation of an interim septic system in 
accord with the applicable standard of the Lake County 
Health Department, during the lime period in which the 
pending Lake County Public Works Department local 
'area-wide" sanitary sewer improvements program sen/- 
ing the subject parcel is being planned and implemented. 
The property in question is legally described as follows: 

Parcel 1: That part of the northeast quarter of the 
southeast quarter of section 26, township 46 north, 
range 9, east of the third principal meridian, described as 
follows: commencing at a point on the north line of said 
quarter quarter section which is 179.0 feet west of the 
northeast comer thereof; thence west along the north 
line of said quarter quarter section 300.00 feet to the 
southeast corner of lot 9 in Rother's Subdivision; thence 
south parallel with the east line of said quarter quarter 
section, 165.0 feet; thence west 100.0 feet; thence north 
165.0 feel to the southwest comer of lot 10 in Rother's 
Subdivision; thence west along the north line of said 
quarter quarter section to a point which is 162.0 feet east 
of the northwest comer of said quarter quarter section; 
thence south 100.0 feet to the north line of Hillside 
Avenue; thence east along the north line of said avenue 
to the east line of said avenue; thence south along said 
east line 100.0 feet; thence east 5.0 feet to the northeriy 
most comer of lot 4 in the second addition to Lotus Park 
a subdivision recorded as document 236484; thence 
south 8 degrees east 50.1 feet along the easteriy line of 
said lot 4; thence south 27 degrees 05 minutes west 
along the easterly lines of lots 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 in said 
second addition to Lotus pari< 217.38 feet to the norther- 
ly most comer of lands described in document 1810567: 
thence south 68 degrees 21 minutes east deed (south 
69 degrees 44 minutes 44 seconds east measure) along 
the northeriy line of said document 1810567 a distance 
of 511.16 feet; thence north 41 degrees 55 minutes 30 
seconds east 444.86 feet; thence south 88 degrees 48 
minutes 01 seconds east 452.27 feet to a point on the 
east line of said quarter quarter section which is 312.18 
feat south of the northeast comer thereof; thence north 
along the east line of said quarter quarter section 147.18 
feet; thence west parallel with the north line of said quar- 
ter quarter section 179.0 feet; thence north 165.0 feet to 
tfie point of beginning, in 1-ake County, Illinois. 

Parcel 2: That part of the northeast quarter of the 
southeast quarter of section 26, township 46 north, 
range 9, east of the third principal meridian described as 
follows: commencing at a point on the east line of said 
quarter quarter section which is 312.18 teat south of the 
northeast comer thereof; thence south 21 degrees 30 
minutes west along the centerline of Grass Lake Road 
as it existed on March 23, 1921, a distance of 567.50 
feet to the northeast comer of lands described in docu- 
ment 233134; thence north 68 degrees 30 minutes west 
275.52 feet along the northeriy line of said document 
233134 to the northwest comer thereof; thence north 68 
degrees 21 minutes west deed (north 69 degrees 44 
minutes 44 seconds west measure) along the northeriy 
line of land described In document 1810567 a distance 
of 303.97 feet to a point which is 51 1.16 feet southeast- 
erly of the northerly most corner of said document 
1810567 (as measured along said northeriy line); thence 
north 41 degrees 55 minutes 30 seconds east 444.86 
feet; thence south 88 degrees 48 minutes 01 seconds 
east 452.27 feet to the point of beginning (excepting 
therefrom these parts described in document 336536 
and document 338539) in Lake County, Illinois. 

Parcel 3: That part of the north fractional half of the 
southeast fractiorial quarter of section 26, township 46 
north, range 9, east of the third principal meridian, 
described as follows: beginning at a point in the center of 
the road, said point of beginning being south 21 degrees 



30 minutes, west 64.1 feet from a point on the east line 
of and 312.2 feet south from the northeast comer of said 
north fractional half of the southeast fractional quarter of 
said section 26; thence south 21 degrees 30 minutes 
west, 83 feet; thence north 83 degrees 40 minutes west, 
168 feet; thence north 62.5 feet; tiienca east 195.6 feet, 
more or less, to the point of beginning (sometimes 
known as lot "Z" in Shunneson's unrecorded subdivi- 
sion), in Lake County, Illinois. 

Parcel 4: That part of the north fractional half of the 
southeast fractional quarter of section 26, township 46 
north, range 9, east of the third principal. meridian, 
described as beginning at a point in the center of the 
public road which is south 21 degrees 30 minutes west, 
167.1 feet from a point on the east line of and 312.2 feet 
south from the northeast comer of said north fractional 
half of the southeast fmctional quarter of said section 26; 
thence northeriy 83 degrees 40 minutes west 168 feet; 
thence south parallel to the east line of said north frac- 
tional half of the southeast fractional quarter of said sec- 
tion 26, 54 feet; thence south 82 degrees east 148,8 
feet, more or less, to a point in the center of said road 
which is south 21 degrees 30 minutes west 60 feet from 
the point of beginning, thence north 21 degrees 30 min- 
utes east 60 feet to the point of beginning, in Lake 
County, Illinois. 

Parcel 5: That part of the north fractional half of the 
southeast fractional quarter of section 26, township 46 
north, range 9, east of the third principal meridian, 
described as follows: beginning at a point on the north 
line of and 579 feet west from the northeast comer of 
said north fract'onal half of the southeast fractional quar- 
' ter of section 26, said point of beginning being the south- 
west corner of lot 10 in Rother's Subdivision; thence 
south along the west line produced of said lot 10 in 
Rother's Subdivision, 165 feet; thence east 100 feet; 
thence north 165 feel to the southeast comer of lot 9 in 
said Rother's Subdivision: Thence west 100 feet to the 
point of beginning, in Lake County, Illinois, 

The subject property is located on the west side of 
Grass Lake Rd,, County Highway AlO, approximately 
550' south from Lake Ave. and 500' north from Hillside 
Avenue and contains 16.321 acres. 

As a result of liie petition of David G, Larson, Deborah 
L. Larson (record owners), 4901 240lh Ave., Salem. Wl 
53168 and Virginia Ross (contract purchaser), 26564 
Grass Lake Road, Antioch, IL 60002, which petition is on 
file and available for examination in the office of the Lake 
County Zoning Board of Appeals, County Administration 
Building, 18 N. County St., Waukegan, IL 60085. All 
interested persons are invited to attend said hearing and 
be heard. 

LAKE COUNTY ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

CLAYTON L. CHRISTENSEN 

Chairman 

For this hearing, reasonable accommodation will be 
made for handicapped persons. This includes accommo- 
dation for the vision and hearing impaired if a request Is 
made within 48 hours of the meeting time, 

Dated at Waukegan, Illinois, this 25th day of May 1993. 



Write Us 

Lakeland Newpapers wants to hear dbws of local 

people, ©vents clubs, organizations, etc. Block and 

wtilte photos are also welcome. Please send news 

Items to Claudia M. Lenart 

n\ 30 S. V\mitnov. Grnv^lnkQ^6Q030^^^ 



PUBUC NOTICE 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF LAKE COUNTY, ILUNOIS 

FOR THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
NORWEST FINANCIAL ILLINOIS INC. 
Plaintiff, 

V8. NO.:93CH308 

ROBERT J. FIOTROWSKI, ROSAUND 
L FIOTROWSKI, UNKNOWN OWNERS 
AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS. 
Defendant*. 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 

The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed 
notice is hereby given you: ROBERT J. FIOTROWSKI, 
ROSALIND L. FIOTROWSKI, UNKNOWN OWNERS 
AND NON RECORD CLAIKMNTS, Defendants in the 
above-entitled suit, that said suit has been commenced 
In the Circuit Court of the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit, 
Lake County, Illinois, by said Plaintiff, against you and 
other Defendants, praying lor the foreclosure of a certain 
Mortgage conveying tfie premises described as follows, 
to wit: 

Parcel One: Lots 15 and 30 In Block 2, In Fox River 
Springs, a subdivision of Pari of the Northeast 1/4 of 
Section 9, and West 1/2 of Section 10, Township 46 
North, Range 9, East of the Third Principal Meridian, 
according to the Plat Thereof recorded September 30, 
1914, as Document No. 155456, in Book "J" of Plats, 
Pages 14 and 15. in Lake County, Illinois. 

Parcel Two; Lot 13 in Block 5 in Fox River Springs, a 
subdivision of Part of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 9, and 
West 1/2 of Section 10, Township 46 North, Range 9, 
East of the Third Prindpal Meridian, according to the Plat 
Thereof recorded September 30, 1914 as Document No. 
155456, in Book 'J' of Plats, Pages 14 and 15, in Lake 
County, Illinois. 

Commonly known as: 42680 N. Parit Avenue, Antioch, 
IL 60002 

P.I.N. No.: 01-10-103-010 
and whidi Mortgage was made by Robert J. Piotrowski 
and Rosalind L. Piotrowski to Nbrwest Rnanctal Illinois 
Inc., and recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds 
of Lake County, Illinois as Document Number 3003055, 
and for such other relief; that summons was duly issued 
out of the said Court against you as provided by law and 
that the said suit is now pending. 

NOW THEREFORE, unless you the above-named 
Defendants, file your answer to the complaint In the said 
suit or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the 
office of the Clerk of the Court of Lake County, Illinois, 
on or before June 25, 1993, default may be entered 
against you at any timo after that day and a judgment 
entered in accordance with the prayer of said comptainL 

Sally D. Coffelt 



0693A-731-AR 
June 4, 1993 



Dated: May 17. 1993 

Arnold G. Kaplan & Associates 

ISO North LaSallo Street . 

Suite 1601 

Chicago, Illinois 60601 

312-372-8347 



Cled< 
Arnold 6. Kaplan 

0593C-696-AR 

May 21, 1993 

May 28, 1993 

June 4, 1993 



TUNE 

Because we are bcal, we 
take the time to get Uie 
v^ole story. 

Each week in your 
Lakeland Newspaper you 
can expect line tuned 
coverage of events thai 
affect you arxl your family 
in detail. 

Stay in tune with your 
Lakeland Newspapers. 
SutBCribe loday 

(708)223 8 IGl 



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11 A.M. TO 2 P.M. 

Spacious duplex features an open floor plan, 
Ihrcc good sized bedrooms, two iuU baths, 1st 
floor laundry room, vaulted ceiling in great 
room, basement, & two car garage, 1 year new I 

*104,900 

DIRKCnoNS: Rl. 83 and North Avenue in Antioch 
WcM to AnIicKti Manor, North on Joticlia to 437 Johclia. 



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Lakeland Newspapers' COUNTY NEWS 



Safety trip foretells future rail service 



by BILL SCHROEDER 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Passengers rode the rails in central Lake 
County for the first time in nearly 30 
years, providing a preview of what rail 
commuting due to start in 1996 will be 
like. 

True, the passengers in four Metra 
double-deckers and a domed observation 
car were on a one-day excursion as part of 
a safety observance, but they were afforded 
a taste of sights and sounds of rail 
commuter service scheduled to begin on 
the Wisconsin Central in three years. 

Railroad representatives and 
municipalities boarded at two points. 
Franklin Park and Wheeling, for the trip 
north to Antioch, which will be the 
terminus for 53 miles of new suburb-to 
downtown Chicago trains linking mid- 
county towns to Chicago Union Station 



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Travelers disembark from one of four 
fvletra commuter cars on the 
Wisconsin Central Line at a stop In 
Lake Villa.— Photo by Gene Gabry 



and OHare Airport. 

Edward Burkhardt, president of the line 

operating profitably and growing since 

purchasing 2,000 miles of Soo Line track 

in 1987, is enthused about adding 

commuter service to freight business that 

has grown from the Soo's six trains a 

week to Wisconsin Central's 14 trains a 

day. 

By 1995, the line expects to be 

operating 20 freights a day to set the stage 

for 14 Metra commuters serving Antioch, 

Lake Villa, Round Lake Beach, 

Grayslake/Libertyville, Mundelein, 

Vernon Hills, Lincolnshire, Buffalo 

Grove, Wheeling, Prospect Heights and 

Deval(Des Plaines). 

A 12lh station has been proposed for 
O'Hare to allow Metra to connect with the 
airport's people mover. Wisconsin 
Central now passes O'Hare miles north of 
the proposed connection to Melra's 
existing Milwaukee Dist. West Line 
running to Fox Lake at "Junction B-12" 
east of Franklin Park. 

In keeping with the trip's theme of 
promoting rail crossing safety, Burchardt 
emphasized that governmental agencies 
and the railroad work together to "alleviate 
rail-highway problems" and produce a 
joint grade crossing plan. 

Until fairly recently, there were many 
unguarded crossings in rural area along the 
former Soo Line. Now, with rapid 
urbanization, both the railroad and local 
governments are hard-pressed to equip 
crossings with gates and/or warning 
devices. 

For the one-day trip, the history making 
passenger train was known as the 
Lifesaver Train. Wisconsin Central 
employees and executives, many of them 
sporting distinctive maroon sports shirts 
with WC insignia provided passengers 



Bob Love kicks off Omni Youth 
Services* new board of ambassadors 



When Chicago Bulls legend. Bob 
Love, addressed the newly created Board of 
Ambassadors of Omni Youth Services on 
May 7 at La TiTi de Paris in Arlington 
Heights, he demonstrated that he is per- 
haps a greater star today than ever before. 

Despite setting just about every scor- 
ing record in Bulls history, including 
Ail-Time Leading Scorer — a feat only re- 
cently surpassed by Michael Jordan, Love 
told his story of lifelong ridicule that re- 
duced him, despite his illustrious 12 years 
as an NBA superstar, to menial jobs like 
busboy and dishwasher, earning a mere 
$4.25 an hour just 8 years ago. 

He relived the hurt and shame of being 
looked at as "less than smart" and in- 
evitably passed over in the lockerroom af- 
ter each and every "big game" as though 
he were literally invisible to the media, 
their cameras and microphones. As devas- 
tating as it was, the reason was simple: 
Bob Love could not speak; be stuttered. 
On the court, he "did it all," but off the 
court, because of an obstacle he could not 
deny, Love was never able to enjoy the 
kinds of endorsements, speaking engage- 
ments and media coverage to which he 
was clearly entitled. Those opportunities, 
albeit often unjustly so, seemed to belong 
to everyone else but him. 

B ut. Love had a dream and held fast to 
it for 45 years — a dream that someday he, 
too, would be able to speak — that he 
would be like Martin Luther King or JFK, 
standing before a crowd and "the words 
would flow" and the people would listen 
and truly care. Today, incredibly, his 
dream has become his reality, having re- 
joined the Chicago Bulls nine months ago 
as their new Director of Community Rela- 
tions. 

Thanks to his last employer, Nord- 
strom's, Love's dedication to hard work, 
perseverance and self-motivation was rec- 
ognized and he was provided with the kind 
of speech therapy that helped him over- 
come his devastating speech impediment. 
Once again a star with the Bulls, he 



speaks to area schools and non-profit or- 
ganizations, encouraging youngsters to 
value their families, schoolteachers and 
education; take personal responsibility for 
their behavior and success; and find what- 
ever strength and courage is necessary to 
overcome obstacles that may hold them 
back from realizing their dreams. To those 
fortunate enough to hear Bob Love's heart- 
felt and powerful story, as did Omni's 
Board of Ambassadors, it is clear that this 
6' 10" genUeman is indeed a giant in more 
ways than one. 

Bob Love is to the Bulls, much like 
the new Board of Ambassadors is to Omni 
Youth Services — advocates of personal re- 
sponsibility and stronger, more caring 
family and community relations. Through 
his painfully honest and touching personal 
story of turning adversity into opportu- 
nity, Love is living proof of the power of 
people helping people. His message of 
hope and inspiration moved the Board of 
Ambassadors of Onmi to action in a way 
they won't soon forget. 

For over twenty years, Omni Youth 
Services has been a valuable resource in 
our communities and encourages a strong, 
active volunteer base to help them carry 
out their programs. Those interested in 
becoming Omni volunteers may call 
537-7603. Omni services include family, 
group and individual counseling, sub- 
stance abuse treatment and prevention, 
child abuse services, school social work 
services, youth development programs, 
peer leadership training, parent program- 
ming and liaison to schools and police. 
Their newly created Board of Ambassadors 
is limited by Charter to 100 members 
who represent a full diversity of gender, 
race, age and background, including en- 
trepreneurs, owners of businesses, corpo- 
rate executives and other influential com- 
munity leaders. For further information 
about the nomination process to become a 
member of Omni's Board of Ambassadors, 
contact Michael J. Sullivan, Chairman, at 
520-9300. 




As part of Operation Lifesaver, a Wisconsin Central passenger train pulls into 
Lake Villa for a lunch stop, on its way back to Franklin Park after traveling as far 
north as Antioch. — Photo by Gene Gabry 



with a running commentary on operations 
and future plans. 

Planners are predicting 2,400 average 
daily boardings for the 1996 start-up, a 
large percentage coming from the current 
ridership on Milwaukee North, 
Milwaukee West and the Chicago & 
North Western northwest lines. 

The planners also expect a strong 
reverse-commute to develop. 

Authorities are theorizing that the 
transfer of ridership will smooth out 
traffic flow, relieve parking congestion 
and provide better all-around service. 

In March of this year, Metra received a 
federal grant to begin preliminary 
engineering and environmental assessment 
studies. Total federal aid has been pegged 
at $21.6 million during the next three 



years. Metra also is pursuing an 
addirional $20.6 million in federal 
funding. The total of $2.2 million in 
federal funding would be matched by 
$39.2 in state and local funding, 
municipal contributions in-kind like land 
for commuter stations and value of rolling 
stock. 

While travelers enjoyed a delightful May 
day and a box lunch during a stop at Lake 
Villa, Metra aides distributed a fact sheet 
on future service on Wisconsin Central. 

Perhaps prophetically, the bottom line 
of the fact sheet was the projection of 
operating expenses estimated at $6.1 
million per year, and operating revenues 
estimated at $3.7 million. The shortfall 
will be made up from other sources. 



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Saluting heroes 



Members of the Polish American Veterans Gen. Pulaski Post serving Lake 
County remember fallen heroes in a ceremony at the dome in Zion. — Photo 
by Rhonda Vinzant 









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Lakeland Newspapers' EDITORIAL 



Taxpayers forgotten 



Battle over kitchen 
inspection fees ought to 
be dropped. 

Lashing out for more revenue in the 
face of tax caps, the Lake County Health 
Depl. might have lashed at the wrong 
people. A hornets nest of opposition has 
erupted over the department's proposal to 
levy a fee for inspecting kitchens in 
schools and other non-profit 
organizations. 

Apparently department moguls who 
concocted the revenue enhancement 
scheme and County Board politicos who 
gave the plan said to raise $150,000 a 
year the greenUght, haven't heard that the 
schools are having revenue problems of 
their own. 

School response was notable for a 
revenue enhancement of their own from 
educators in Waukegan and Liberty ville 



High School who announced that they are 
considering plans to charge the county for 
using schools for polling places. Touche! 
With election machinery introduced, 
County Clerk Linda Hess has been drawn 
into the fray. Wait a minute, folks, cried 
Hess, who added up possible polling place 
rental costs and came up about $80,000 
short in her budget for elections. Hess, 
with no little self interest, has volunteered 
to mediate differences between the schools 
and the health departmcnL 

As an experienced and responsible public 
official, Hess can be counted upon to 
remind the warring factions that both 
sides are serving the same boss, John Q. 
Citizen, and tliat taking money out of one 
of John's pockets to stick in anotlier 
doesn't make much sense. So the kitchen 
fee vs. poll rental battle could well be 
dropped. A better question is what to do 
about all the bands that already are in 
John's pockets? 



Gambling with schools 



Edgar gets Daley's 
attention about school 
funding problems with 
riverboat gambling 
proposition. 

Much as the prospect of another 
gambling scheme to fund Illinois public 
schools is to be deplored. Gov. Jim 
Edgar may be on the right track by 
linking approval of riverboat gambling 
for Chicago with a requirement that some 
of the tax revenue be spent on city 
schools. 

That places a major part of the Illinois 
school funding problem squarely where it 
belongs — in Chicago. 

Because he lacks the political courage to 
stand up to the monolithic Chicago 
Teacher's Union, Mayor Richard Daley is 
loathe to share city gambling tax with the 
Chicago Public Schools. 

Despite intense Democratic and big city 
media pressure for the General Assembly 
to "fulfill Constitutional requirements" 
for public school funding, suburban 
Republicans and downstate legislators 
know that any release of new school 
moneys wilt be sucked into the "black 
hole" of education in Chicago. Our 
community and the rest of the state 



suffers due to lack of Chicago school 
reform and conct<?sions from the Chicago 
Teacher's Union. 

The emergency aid voted North Chicago 
schools, we believe, is an indication that 
legislators can do what's right and 
necessary for public education in Illinois 
when they aren't encumbered by Chicago 
politics. In a convoluted sort of way, the 
Chicago casino gambling greenlight can 
be "what's right" if the proper strings are 
attached. 

Daley is a high profile example of what 
happens when local officialdom takes a 
stand-offish attitude about school 
spending. That's how unaffordable 
teachers' contracts are exacted from 
defenseless board of education members 
who stand unsupported before the 
onslaught of professional union 
organizers and high-priced attorneys who 
are demanding more and more. 

Edgar is putting Daley's feet to the fire. 
Good for him. Instead of joining the 
chorus bleating for the General Assembly 
"to do more for education," elected 
officials at all levels ought to take a 
closer look at local school spending. 
Maybe you don't like the way Edgar is 
doing it, but it's hard to deny that he has a 
mayor thinking seriously about school 
funding. 




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Majority rule threatened 
by society's tinker ers 



by VIRGINIA PARK 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Last week we wrote about Lani 
Guinier, President Clinton's nominee to 
head the Civil Rights Division of the Jus- 
tice Depl. There is more... 

In March 1991 she wrote a 77 page 
brief in the Michigan Law Review in 
which she said, "In a system shaped by ir- 
rational, majority prejudice," justice may 
have to be found in "remedial mechanisms 
that eliminate pure majority rule." 

That's pretty frightening stuff— at 
least to me, My background and education 
have led me to believe that the heart and 
soul of democracy is majority rule with 
"one-man, one vote". What could be more 
fair? 

The crux of the whole matter is the 
term "minorities" which has racial and 
ethnic overtones. In America we should 
have only Americans. 

If people are to become American citi- 
zens, they should wear their national ori- 
gin or race sunply as an ornament of their 
culture, and bring to their citizenship the 
same weight as any other beneficiary of 
our American system of government. 



I already have sincere reservations 
about the authenticity of many voters to- 
day. With the "motor- voter" law just ap- 
proved, the actual registration process 
may be fraught with even more possibili- 
ties of fraud. 

Will they be sworn in by a legislative 
officer with the proper authority as at the 

Commentary 

courthouse, or subsidiary thereof, which 
was the procedure when I became an elec- 
tion judge about forty years ago? Or will 
many illegal aliens who have never be- 
came citizens in the proper manner be 
pulling iheir weight at the ballot box just 
because they're here, accepting our largess 
and thinking they have a right to vote. A 
resident is not the same as a citizen, 
which fact seems to be overlooked. 

The ballot of the American citizen is 
his most precious possession. It origi- 
nated in the creation of democracy over 
200 years ago, and is not to be dispensed 
(Continued on next page) 



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Mid-county commuter line catcliing on: '96 report 



by BILL SCHROEDER 

Fast forward to 1996. 

Rail commuting is beginning on the 
new mid-county system on the Wisconsin 
Central, providing some of Lake County's 
fastest growing communities with a new 
transportation dimension to O'Hare 
Airport and downtown Chicago. 

Meira is running 14 trains daily — seven 
each way—with rush hour and 
intermediate service between north Cook 
County and Antioch. Where convenient, 
veteran rail commuters are switching 
from the NorthWestem line and the Fox 
Lake spur. There is demonstrated 
evidence that drivers are leaving their cars 
at the string of attractive, modem 
commuter stations at Buffalo Grove, 
Vernon Hills, Mundelein, Libertyville- 
Grayslake, Round Lake Beach, Lake Villa 
and Antioch. 

Gov, Jim Edgar is using the new 
commuter service as a showpiece in his 
campaign for a second term. Martin 
Buehler, veteran director of the Lake 
County Div. of Transportation, haUs the 
line as a example of forward thinking in 
the late 80's and early 90's. County Board 
Chairman Robert Depke, invincible as the 



county's top governmental and political 
leader, says the new service will provide 
a magnet for continued economic 
development and new jobs without 
putting more pressure on the county's 
antiquated highway system. 

Village officials along the Wisconsin 
Central arc congratulating each other that 
the new service, while a long time 
coming, is well worth the wait because it 
enhances the quality of life and reduces 
taxes. 

Initial reaction of new riders is positive. 
They feel the county's central rail line is 
cutting their commuting time. Lake 
County residents everywhere are looking 
forward to the O'Hare link and connection 
with the three-year-old people mover 
service. Urbanologists are extolling the 
new line because it also is being used, as 
they predicted, heavily by residents of 
closer-in suburbs commuting to jobs in 
Vernon area office parks, the Motorola 
plant on Rle. 45 and some of the new 
industries that have sprung up in 
Grayslake, the Lake Villa-Lindenhurst 
area and Antioch. 

South county commuters like the 



spacious parking area west of Wheeling's 
fabulously successful water park. Buffalo 
Grove residents are extolling the vutues 
of boarding at their own station or driving 
to WhecUng. 

Old habits die slowly so many 
Lincolnshire commuters still are driving 
to Deerfield to catch NorthWestem trains. 
Dense woods surrounding Indian Creek 
remain as a notable "nature break" 
between industry on both sides of the line 
south of Vernon Hills and the maturing 
subdivisions on either side of the u:acks 
north of Mundelein, 

Grayslake and Libertyville officials 
finally have resigned themselves to the 
fact that they can share the Prairie 
Crossing station off Rles. 21 and 83. 
And both can "share" the inarguable 
eyesore of the county's major landfill that 
protrudes into the suburban sky nearby. 

A growing number of residents in 
Round Lake Beach, central Lake County's 
population center, now realize their 
foresight in purchasing new homes back 
in 1993 near the Mallard Creek station off 
Rollins Rd., eliminating the hassle of 
cross-town driving to the congested 




Round Lake station astride Rtc. 134. 

The county's new north-south rail 
commuter service is serving as a 
renaissance for downtown Lake Villa 
where the new conmiuter station has 
ignited memories of the days when horse- 
drawn carriages met tourists transported 
on the Soo Line to carry them to Chain 
O'Lakes resorts. 

Antioch officials are happy with the 
status of being the northern terminus of 
the Chicago metropolitan area's first new 
rail commuter line in half a century. 
They intend to capitalize on the 
designation as part of an economic 
development program. 

So after nearly 30 years of effort, 
Wisconsin Central commuter service is a 
reality. What new transportation worlds 
to conquer? Rtc. 53's northward 
extension still is on the drawing boards. 
Hmmmm. 




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Lakeland Newspapers' OPINION 



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Pal gets nice job 

Editor: 

Lake Villa Township Trustees Joe 
Hamm, Carolyn Siebert and Michelle 
Wolf have created a $500 per week job for 
the Sure Party supervisor candidate, Karen 
Sullivan. The voters elected qualified 
trustee? I think not! 

No budget has been passed, no job 
description is- available, no established 
working hours have been created, no 
advertisement or notice has ever been 
posted for this new job. We just give it 
to our pal, Karen. Don't forget benefits- 
insurance, vacations, retirement, etc. 

All this because Joe, Carolyn and 
Michelle don't like Supervisor Sue 
Hanson. This country's taxes have gotten 
out of control because of politicians such 
as these trustees. 

Come out to the township budget 
meeting. There are two dates. The 
township bulletin board and the post 
• office show 8 p.m. June 8; in the 
newspaper they stated 8 p.m. June 9. 
Maybe a phone call to one of the above 
trustees will get the exact date, but don't 
try Hamm. He is unlisted. Come on out. 



Majority 



(Continued from preceding page) 

lightly to those who do not valu^ its 
worth. 

It is not a tool for getting advantages 
for certain groups, but a means of secur- 
ing justice and equality for all. 

We see on the American scene today 
from coast to coast many Americans of 
differing backgrounds and races who have 
made it to important public offices. They 
are there as individuals, carrying out their 
responsibilities in a commendable way. 
We are glad for them and proud of them. 
They are demonstrating that such attain- 
ments are possible under our original Vot- 
ing Rights Act which does not need "re- 
medial mechanisms" to "eliminate major- 
ity rule." 



Lake Villa Township residents, unless 
you could care less^ 

Joyce F, Frayer 
LakeViUa 

Anti-Semitism shows 

Editor: 

It was with much dismay that I read the 
letter about the Holocaust Museum that 
may be tainted with anti-Semitism. 

After the museum, visit Arlington 
National Cemetery where Jewish soldiers, 
sailors, airmen and marines are resting in 
peace under the Star of David, on U.S. 
land maintained by yoi^r tax dollars. 

No power on earth will make me 
forget the Jews in my outfit. They were 
soldiers, wore the same combat garb, 
stood at attention, saluting the Stars and 
S tripes and were shot at 

Men have died for the privileges we 
enjoy today. Don't anybody forget. I pay 
taxes for the privilege of living in the 
land of the free and the home of the bmve 
chosen by my parents (not Jewish). 

Edward S. Poska 

World War II veteran 

Grayslake 

Community threatened 

Editor 

I was inconrecdy quoted about the Merit 
Club plan for office and retail. I did not 
take the statement by the Globe attorney 
that "we guarantee saving 50 percent of 
the trees" as a threat 

What I did perceive as a threat to the 
board and ultimately the community was 
the attorney's statement that "if we did 
accept Globe's petition as presented they 
would guarantee SO percent of the trees, 
and if not, alLthe trees or a good portion 
may have to come down." 

I really do not think a savings of SO 
percent is something to brag about. 
Show me a plan with few buildings and 
paricing lots adding to water problems and 
save 75 percent of the trees, and now you 
will learn my respect and praise. 

I, and some of the other commissioners, 
were uneasy about approving plans that 
may or may not be implemented for up to 



15 years. The annexation agreement that 
allowed Merit Club (Globe), the extended 
time limit for development, did not allow 
us much choice. The safeguards are that 
\yhen development does begin, Globe will 
be to come back to the Plan Commission 
with their final plans and have them 
approved through the hearing process. 

Ken Hellstem 

Plan Commission 

Gumee 

Sears promo ludicrous 

Editor 

The Sears marketing and advertising 
schemes will not be accepted. 

A $5 coupon and promotion which I 
found in my mail box today was disgust- 
ing. The company was not even able to 
put Vernon Hills on the map, because of 
its distance from Fox Lake! 

Sears is mistaken if they think that I 
will transfer my purchasing to the "NW 
Comer of Hwy. 21 and Hwy 60." After 
closing of the Fox Lake store, my opin- 
ion of Sears has decreased to the point of 
questioning whether or not I will ever 
again purchase anything from it The at- 
tempted ploy to create a transfer to an- 
other Sears "that feels like home" and 
which "reaffirms commitment" is not ac- 
ceptable. 

The Fox Lake Sears store adequately 
served me as a Fox Lake/Ingleside resident 
for 21 years. I had made many purchases 
there and become very familiar with that 
store during those years. To think that 
Sears would attempt to transfer our pur- 
chasing dollars to the Vernon Hills store 
with a $5 incentive is ludicrous! It would 
not even pay the automobile expense to 
drive there. 

The motto, "You C:an Count on Me." 
is laughable. Sears is wasting profits 
made from the Fox Lake store on ineffec- 
tive advertising. Sears did count on me for 
21 years, and could have continued to do 
so, but unfortunately I can no longer 
count on Sears! Enclosed is the $S 
coupon. 

Diana S. Richards 
Ingleside 



Letters Invited 

Letters to the editor are welcome. 
They should be on topics of general 
interest approximately 250 words or 
less. All letters must be signed, and 
contain a home address and telq)hone 
number. The editor reserves the right 
to condense all letters. 



No thought to future 

Editor. 

I would like to say thank you to all 
the officials of Grayslake and surrounding 
areas who, for the past four plus years 
liave worked so diUgeody, in an effort to 
increase the tax bases, and welcomed any 
and all developers with open arms without 
forethought as to Uie impact on schools, 
roads, and general day-to-day doing busi- 
ness. 

Didn't anyone, anywhere, anytime, 
give thought to the fact that if developers 
were allowed to develop, the result would 
be chaos on the already obsolete roads? 
Did anyone, anywhere, anytime exert any 
diligence, as to the necessity of widening 
the roads, such as Rte. 120, Rte. 83/137, 
Harris Rd„ Rte. 45, etc. Before the 
developing began? And now.. .now... 
Winchester, Atkinson, Allegheny and 
other arteries are closed for construction!!! 
Who, in their right mind closes the alter- 
nate routes. All at the same time? It now 
takes longer to drive from Grayslake to 
Liberty ville, to Lincolnshire, to Lake 
Forest to Vemon Hills, to anywhere con- 
sidered local, than it does to drive from 
(jrayslake to Northbrook! From Grayslake 
to Alsip, Illinois (65 miles U) tiie soutii) 
travel time one hour, five nunutes! Lake 
Forest to Grayslake,' (17 miles) travel 
time - 50 minutes! Got Uie picUire? 

lis anyone out there working on 
updating, and bringing the roads into the 
CTowded 1990's, better yet into die 21st 
century? 

Pat Rollinger 
Grayslake 



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Introducing Fine 

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Friday, J{in«4M 993' 



Lak^ra'nid'No'v^t^^'rl^' 



Lakeland Newspapers' EDITORIAL 



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Taxpayers forgotten 



Battle over kitchen 
inspection fees ought to 
be dropped. 

Lashing out for more revenue in the 
face of tax caps, the Lake County Health 
Dept. might have lashed al the wrong 
people. A hornets nest of opposition has 
erupted over the department's proposal to 
levy a fee for inspecting kitchens in 
schools and other non-profit 
organizations. 

Apparently department moguls who 
concocted ih& revenue enhancement 
scheme and County Board politicos who 
gave the plan said to raise S150,000 a 
year the greenlight, haven't heard that the 
schools are having revenue problems of 
their own. 

School response was notable for a 
revenue enhancement of their own from 
educators in Waukegan and Libertyville 



High School who announced that they are 
considering plans to charge the county for 
using schools for polling places. Toucfae! 
With election machinery introduced. 
County Clerk Linda Hess has been drawn 
into the fray. Wait a minute, folks, cried 
Hess, who added up possible polUng place 
rental costs and came up about $80,000 
short in her budget for elections, Hess, 
with no litde self interest, has volunteered 
to mediate differences between the schools 
and the health department 
As an experienced and responsible public 
official, Hess can be counted upon to 
remind the waning factions that both 
sides are serving the same boss, John Q. 
Citizen, and that taking money out of one 
of John's pockets to stick in auother 
doesn't make much sense. So the kitchen 
fee vs. poll rental battle could well be 
dropped. A better question is what to do 
about all the hands that already are in 
John's pockets? 







Gambling with schools Majority rule threatened 

TTAnaw nckic Flolox/'c suffers duc lo lack of Chicaeo school J •/ 



Edgar gets Daley's 
attention about school 
funding problems with 
riverboat gambling 
proposition. 

Much as the prospect of another 
gambling scheme to fund Illinois public 
schools is to be deplored, Gov. Jim 
Edgar may be on the right track by 
linking approval of riverboat gambling 
for Chicago with a requirement that some 
of the lax revenue be spent on city 
schools. 

That places a major part of the Illinois 
school funding problem squarely where it 
belongs — in Chicago. 

Because he lacks the political courage to 
stand up to the monolithic Chicago 
Teacher's Union, Mayor Richard Daley is 
loathe to share city gambling tax with the 
Chicago Public Schools. 

Despite intense Democratic and big city 
media pressure for the General Assembly 
to "fulfill Constitutional requirements" 
for public school funding, suburban 
Republicans and downstate legislators 
know that any release of new school 
moneys will be sucked into the "black 
hole" of education in Chicago. Our 
community and the rest of the state 



suffers due lo lack of Chicago school 
reform and concessions from the Chicago 
Teacher's Union. 
The emergency aid voted North Chicago 
schools, we believe, is an indication that 
legislators can do what's right and 
necessary for public education in Illinois 
when they aren't encumbered by Chicago 
politics. In a convoluted sort of way, the 
Chicago casino gambling greenlight can 
be "what's right" if the proper strings are 
attached. 

Daley is a high profile example of what 
happens when local officialdom takes a 
stand-offish attitude about school 
spending. That's how unaffordable 
teachers' contracts are exacted from 
defenseless board of education members 
who stand unsupported before the 
onslaught of professional union 
organizers and high-priced attorneys who 
are demanding more and more. 

Edgar is putting Daley's feet to the fire. 
Good for him. Instead of joining the 
chorus bleating for the General Assembly 
"to do more for education," elected 
officials at all levels ought to take a 
closer look at local school spending. 
Maybe you don't like the way Edgar is 
doing it, but it's hard to deny that he has a 
mayor thinking seriously about school 
funding. 



by society's tinkerers 



by VIRGINIA PARK 
Lakelaod Newspapers 

Last week we wrote about Lani 
Guinier. President Clinton's nominee to 
head the Civil Rights Division of the Jus- 
tice Dept. There is more... 

In March 1991 she wrote a 77 page 
brief in the Michigan Law Review in 
which she said, "In a system shaped by ir- 
rational, majority prejudice," justice may 
have lo be found in "remedial mechanisms 
that eliminate pure majority rule." 

That's pretty frightening stuff — at 
least to me. My background and education 
have led me to believe that the heart and 
soul of democracy is majority rule wida 
"one-man, one vote". What could be more 
fair? 

The crux of the whole matter is the 
term "minorities" which has racial and 
ethnic overtones. In America we should 
have only Americans. 

If people are to become American citi- 
zens, they should wear their national ori- 
gin or race simply as an ornament of their 
culture, and bring to their citizenship the 
same weight as any other beneficiary of 
our American system of government. 



I already have sincere reservations 
about the authenticity of many voters to- 
day. With Uie "motor-voter" law just ap- 
proved, the actual registration process 
may be fraught with even more possibili- 
lies of fraud. 

Will they be sworn in by a legislative 
officer with die proper authority as at the 

Commentary 

courthouse, or subsidiary thereof, which 
was the procedure when I became an elec- 
tion judge about fony years ago? Or will 
many illegal aliens who have never be- 
came citizens in the proper manner be 
pulling their weight at the ballot box just 
because they're here, accepting our largess 
and thinking they have a right to vole. A 
resident is not the same as a citizen, 
which fact seems to be overlooked. 

The ballot of the American citizen is 
his most precious possession. It origi- 
nated in the creation of democracy over 
200 years ago, and is not to be dispensed 
(Continued on next page) 



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Mid-county commuter line catching on: ^96 report 



by BILL.SCHROEDER 

Fast forward to 1996. 
Rail commuting is beginning on the 
new mid-county system on the Wisconsin 
Central, providing some of Lake County's 
faslest growing communities widi a new 
transportation dimension to O'Hare 
Airport and downtown Chicago. 

MeLra is running 14 trains daily— seven 
each way— with rush hour and 
intermediate service between north Cook 
County and Antioch. Where convenient, 
veteran rail commuters are switching 
from the NordiWestem line and the Fox 
Lake spur. There is demonstrated 
evidence that drivers are leavuig Uieir cars 
at the string of attractive, modern 
commuter stations at Buffalo Grove, 
Vernon Hills, Mundclein, Libertyvillc- 
Grayslake, Round Lake Beach, Lake Villa 
and Antioch. 

Gov. Jim Edgar is using the new 
commuter service as a showpiece in his 
campaign for a second term. Martin 
Buchler, veteran director of the Lake 
County Div, of Transportation, hails the 
line as a example of forward thinking in 
the late 80's and early 90's. County Board 
Chairman Robert Depke, invincible as the 



county's top governmental and political 
leader, says the new service will provide 
a magnet for continued economic 
development and new jobs without 
putting more pressure on the county's 
antiquated highway system. 

Village officials along the Wisconsin 
Central are congratulating each other that 
the new service, while a long lime 
coming, is well worth the wait because it 
enhances the quality of life and reduces 
taxes. 

Initial rcaction of new riders is positive. 
They feel the county's central rail line is 
cutting their commuting time. Lake 
County residents everywhere are looking 
forward to (he O'Hare link and connection 
with the three-year-old people mover 
service. Urbanologists arc extolling die 
new line because it also is being used, as 
they predicted, heavily by residents of 
closcr-in suburbs commuting to jobs in 
Vernon area office parks, the Motorola 
plant on Rte. 45 and some of the new 
industries that have sprung up in 
Grayslakc, the Lake Villa-Lindcnhurst 
area and Antioch. 

South county commuters like the 



spacious parking area west of Wheeling's 
fabulously successful water park. Buffalo 
Grove residents are extolling the virtues 
of boarding at their own station or driving 
to Wheeling. 

Old habits die slowly so many 
Lincolnshire commuters still are driving 
to Dcerfield to catch North Western trains. 
Dense woods surrounding Indian Creek 
remain as a notable "nature break" 
between industry on both sides of the Ime 
south of Vernon Hills and the maturing 
subdivisions on either side of the tracks 
north of Mundelein. 

Grayslake and Libertyville officials 
finally have resigned themselves to the 
fact that they can share the Prairie 
Crossing station off Ries. 21 and 83. 
And both can "share" the inarguablc 
eyesore of die county's major landfill that 
prouiidcs into die suburban sky nearby. 

A growing number of residents in 
Round Lake Beach, cenual Lake County's 
population center, now realize their 
foresight in purchasing new homes back 
in 1993 near die Mallard Creek stadon off 
Rollins Rd., eliminating the hassle of 
cross-town driving to die congested 





Round La)^ station astride Rte. 134. 

The county's new north-souUi rail 
commuter service is serving as a 
renaissance for downtown Lake Villa 
where the new commuter stadon has 
ignited memories of the days when horse- 
drawn carriages met tourists transported 
on the Soo Line to carry them to Chain 
O'Lakes resorts. 

Antioch officials are happy wiUi die 
status of being the nordiem terminus of 
die Chicago metropolitan area's first new 
rail commuter line in half a century. 
They intend to capitalize on the 
designation as part of an economic 
development program. 

So after nearly 30 years of effort, 
Wisconsin Central conmiuter service is a 
reality. What new iransportadon worlds 
lo conquer? Rte. 53's northward 
extension still is on die drawing boards. 
Hmmmm. 



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Lakeland Newspapers' OPINION 






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Pal gets nice job 

Editor: 

Lake Villa Township Trustees Joe 
Hamm, Carolyn Siebert and Michelle 
Wolf have created a $500 per week job for 
the Sure Party supervisor candidate, Karen 
Sullivan. The voters elected qualified 
trustee? I think not! 

No budget has been passed, ho job 
description is available, no established 
working hours have been created, no 
advertisement or notice has ever been 
posted for this new job. We just give it 
to our pal, Karen^ Don't forget benefits — 
insurance, vacations, retirement, etc. 

/All; this because Joe, Carolyn and 
MicheHe don't like Supervisor Sue 
Hanson. This country's taxes have gotten 
out of control because of politicians such 
as thesiVtrustees. 

Cn>Me out to the township budget 
meeting. There are two dates. The 
township bulletin board and the post 
•office show 8 p.m. June 8; in the 
newspaper they stated 8 p.m. June 9. 
Maybe a phone call to one of the above 
trustees will get the exact date, but don't 
try Hamra. He is unlisted. Come on out. 



Majority 



(Continued from preceding page) 

lightly to those who do not value its 
worth. 

It is not a tool for getting advantages 
for certain groups, but a means of secur- 
ing justice and equality for all. 

We see on the American scene today 
from coast to coast many Americans of 
differing backgrounds and races who have 
made it to important pubUc offlces. They 
are there as individuals, carrying out their 
responsibilities in a commendable way. 
We are glad for them and proud of them. 
They are demonstrating that such attain- 
ments are possible under our original Vot- 
ing Rights Act which does not need "re- 
medial mechanisms" to "eliminate major- 
ity rule." 



Lake Villa Township residents, unless 
you could care less. 

Joyce F. Frayer 
Lake ViUa 

Anti-Semitism shows 

Editor: 

It was with much dismay that I read the 
letter about the Holocaust Museum that 
may be tainted with anti-Semitism. 

After the museum, visit Arlington 
National Cemetery where Jewish soldiers, 
sailors, airmen and marines are resting in 
peace under the Star of David, on U.S. 
land maintained by your tax dollars. 

No power on earth will make me 
forget the Jews in my outfit. They were 
soldiers, wore the same combat garb, 
stood at attention, saluting the Stars and 
Stripes and were shot at. 

Men have died for the privileges we 
enjoy today. Don't anybody forget I pay 
taxes for the privilege of living in the 
land of the free and the home of the brave 
chosen by my parents (not Jewish). 

Edward S. Poska 

World War II veteran 

Grayslake 

Community threatened 

Editor 

I was incorrecdy quoted about the Merit 
Club plan for office and retail. I did not 
take the statement by the Globe attorney 
that "we guarantee saving 50 percent of 
the trees" as a threat. 

What I did perceive as a threat to the 
board and ultimately the conmiunity was 
the attorney's statement that "if we did 
accept Globe's petition as presented they 
would guarantee SO percent of the trees, 
and if not, alLthe trees or a good portion 
may have to come down." 

I really do not think a savings of 50 
percent is something to brag about. 
Show me a plan with few buildings and 
' parking lots adding to water problems and 
save 75 percent of the trees, and now you 
will learn my respect and praise. 

I, and some of the other commissioners, 
were uneasy about approving plans that 

may or may not be implemented for up to 



15 years. The annexation agreement that 
allowed Merit Qub (Globe), the extended 
time limit for development, did not allow 
us much choice. The safeguards are that 
when development does begin, Globe will 
be to come back to the Plan Commission 
with their final plans and have them 
approved through the hearing process. 

Ken Hellstem 

Plan Commission 

Gumee 

Sesirs promo ludicrous 

Editor 

The Sears marketing and advertising 
schemes will not be accepted. 

A $5 coupon and promotion which I 
found in my mail box today was disgust- 
ing. The company was not even able to 
put Vernon HUls on the map, because of 
its distance from Fox Lake! 

Sears is mistaken if they thmk that I 
will transfer my purchasing to the "NW 
Comer of Hwy. 21 and Hwy 60." After 
closing of the Fox Lake store, my opin- 
ion of Sears has decreased to the point of 
questioning whether or not I will ever 
again purchase anything from it The at- 
tempted ploy to create a transfer to an- 
other Sears "that feels like home" and 
which "reaffirms conunitment" is not ac- 
ceptable. 

The Fox Lake Sears store adequately 
served me as a Fox Lake/Ingleside resident 
for 21 years. I bad made many purchases 
therc and become very familiar with that 
store during those years. To think that 
Sears would attempt to transfer our pur- 
chasing dollars to the Vernon Hills store 
with a $5 incentive is ludicrous! It would 
not even pay the automobile expense to 
drive there. 

The motto, "You Can Count on Me." 
is laughable. Sears is wasting profits 
made from the Fox Lake store on ineffec- 
tive advertising. Sears did count on me for 
21 years, and could have continued to do 
so, but unfortunately I can no longer 
count on Sears! Enclosed is the $5 
coupon. 

Diana S. Richards 
Ingleside 



Letters Invited 

Letters to the editor are welcome. 
They should be on topics of general 
interest, approximately 250 words or 
less. All letters must be signed, and 
contain a home address and telephone 
number. The editor reserves the right 
to condense all letters. 



No thought to future 

Editor. 

I would like to say thank you to all 
the officials of Grayslake and surrounding 
areas who, for the past four plus years 
have worked so diligently, in an effort to 
increase the tax bases, and welcomed any 
and all developers with open arms without 
forethought as to the impact on schools, 
roads, and general day-to-day doing busi- 
ness. 

Didn't anyone, anywhere, anytime, 
give thought to the fact that if developers 
were allowed to develop, the result would 
be chaos on the already obsolete roads? 
Did anyone, anywhere, anytime exert any 
diligence, as to the necessity of widening 
the roads, such as Rle. 120, Rte. 83/137, 
Harris Rd., Rte. 45, etc. Before the 
developing began? And now.. .now... 
Winchester, Atkinson, Allegheny and 
other arteries arc closed for constmction ! ! 1 
Who, in their right mind closes the alter- 
nate routes. All at the same dme? It now ' 
takes longer to drive from Grayslake to 
Liberty viUe, to Lincolnshire, to Lake 
Forest, to Vernon Hills, to anywhere con- 
sidered local, than it does to drive from 
Grayslake to Northbrook! From Grayslake 
to Alsip, Ulinois (65 miles to the south) 
travel time one hour, five minutes! Lake 
Forest to Grayslake," (17 miles) travel 
time - 50 minutes! Got the picture? 

Is anyone out there working on 
updating, and bringmg the roads into the 
crowded 1990's, better yet, into the 21 si 
century? 

Pat Rollinger 
Grayslake 



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iPremier to reduce 
Baxter business 

DEERFIELD— Baxter Internat- 
ional Inc. could lose up lo $50 
million in hospital business this year 
as Premier Hospitals Alliance, a 150 
hospital affiliation based in 
Westchester, 111., said it plans to 
scrutinize each contract that expires 
with Baxter over the coming year in 
protest of Baxter's ethics and business 
practices. Premier, which purchases 
more than $250 million a year in 
medical and surgical supplies from 
Baxter, plans to conduct business with 
Baxter on a "contract lo conu-act" 
basis, pending their assessment of 



Business Briefs 



Baxter's progress, Baxter officials 
plead guilty to federal felony charges 
that Baxter supplied ' extensive 
information to Arab boycott 
authorities about Baxter's business in 
Israel. 



Kemper considers 
broker unit buyers 

LONG GROVE— Kemper Corp. 
announced it's received "a number of 
inquiries and expressions of interest" 
from potential buyers of its securities 
brokerage operations. A Kemper 
spokeswoman said the inquiries are 



under review, but no decisions have 
been made. Kemper Securities Inc. is 
based in Long Grove. 



Fansteel declares 
$•10 dividend 

NORTH CHICAGO— Fansteel 

Inc. announced that its Board of 
Directors declared a $.10 per share, 
regular quarterly dividend on the 
company's $2.50 par value common 
stock. The dividend is payable June 14 
to stockholders of record as of the 
close of business on June 4. 



Blue Crbss'merges 
with other plans 

GRAYSLAKE— Blue Cross and 
Blue Shield plans in Illinois will 
merge with similar plans in Iowa, and 
South Dakota lo form a ne\y Midwest 
health-insurance conglomerate that 
will cover 3.6 million people and 
could foreshadow the future of health 
care under President Bill Clinton. The 
new heallh-carc group will bring in a 
estimated $4.1 billion, while paying 
out an estimated $3.8 billion 
annually. A number of Lake County 
companies and municipal bodies offer 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield to their 
employees. 






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Lawrence garners top honor from Realtors group 



When Steve Lawrence was attending 
classes at Illinois State University, he 
was pursing and earned a bachelor of sci- 
ence in education. 

"I wanted instant gratification, though. 
In this business, you can get that. You ci- 
ther make the sale or not," Lawrence said. 



I)\ S ILMi I»i: IKKSON 

|.:iki'l:ih(l Nv«s|»ii|U'rs 



The switch from education to being a 
real estate agent was made eight years 
ago. Today. Lawrence is manager of Poc 
& Poe in Waukcgan and has reached the 
top of his profession as he was named 
Realtor of the Year by the Lake County 
Assn. of Realtors. 

"I have a lot of respect for teachers. 
There is a great feeling, though, when 
you sec someone two to five years later at 
a grocery store who says, 'thank you for 
finding our house. We love it'," Lawrence 
said. 



Lawrence is chairman of the education 
committee of the Realtors group, and 
serves on the associates committee as a 
liaison. 

"The education committee works to 

make sure the members arc better prepared 
with more knowledge to meet the needs of 
customers," Lawrence said. 

The Realtor has seen quite a few changes 
in how the real estate agents arc regulated 
since joining Murrie-Bchm Real Estate in 
Grayslakc.eight years ago. That firm was 
purchased by Poc & Poc in 1986. 

"When I first started, it was here is your 
desk and phone, get to work," he said. 
Realtors not only have to know the 
business of selling but the legalities as 
well. 

"It is referrals and personal service that 
keep you in business," Lawrence said. 

Those do not come right away. 
. "The first year is a learning process and 
the second year you actually begin to 
make money. Anyone who has been in 




Kathy Scott and Julie Kalter 



Two area nurses selected 
for two-week Russia tour 



Two staff members at Midwestern 
Regional Medical Center, in Zion. are 
spending two weeks in Russia working 
in hospitals, presenting lectures and 
learning about the counuy's people and 
cultures. 

Kathy Scott, director of oncology in- 
take, and Julie Kalter, caremap manager, 
joined eight other nurses from Illinois 
and Wisconsin on the Russian -U.S. 
Nursing Consortium-sponsored trip. 

Scott and Kalter will reside with the 
families of two nurses from Moscow 
who visited Midwestern in August as 
part of the consortium's exchange 
program. The host families have planned 
meetings with medical and political 
officials and tours to other parts of the 



country, including a visit to St. 
Petersburg. 

"I am so excited about this opportu- 
nity that I find it hard to sleep at night," 
said Kalter the day before her departure 
on May 13. 

Several mementos from Midwestem- 
-T-shirts, coffee cups, first aid kits-have 
been packed in the women's suitcases 
and will be given to their host families, 
government officials and hospital 
workers. 

"We are so pleased that everyone at 
Midwestern has supported us and has al- 
lowed us to take this once-in-a-lifetime 
trip," said Scott. "Julie and I are pleased 
to have this opportunity to represent our 
country, our hospital and our nurses." 



the business for five years or so should 
know what his or her income will be," 
Lawrence said. 

The real estate business continues to 
boom with the growth of Lake County. 

"We're busy, but there should be people 
lining up outside the door of every real es- 
tate office. The interest rate is eight per- 
cent and the adjustable rate is 6.5 per- 
cent," Lawrence said. "Maybe it is the 
lack of confidence in their jobs." 

In fact, the latest consunier confidence 
study did show a dip from March. 

In addition lo his activities with the Re- 
altors group, Lawrence is vice president of 
the Grayslakc Area Chamber of Com- 
merce and Industry. 

"I love it. Just the people you meet 
working for a common goal and the cal- 
iber of people in the Chamber is amaz- 
ing," Lawrence said. 

His association with the Chamber began 
at the group's annual golf outing. Before 
he knew it, he was sitting on the board of 
directors. 

"It is always nice to give something 
back to the community," he said. 

Lawrence was born in a home in 
Grayslake where his grandmother still 
lives. "I can remember when the town 
was 2,00 people and everyone knew you. 
I can't imagine living anywhere else but 
Grayslake," he said. 

While he executes deals in all parts of 
the county, Grayslakc continues to be a 
reliable source of business. "I have sold 
homes from Kenosha to Spring Grove," 
Lawrence said. 




Steve Lawrence 

The building boom has hit the border 
towns in Wisconsin and while the homes 
were originally cheaper than in Lake 
County, they arc going up. "And in Wis- 
consin, there is a higher tax rate," 
Lawrence said. 

Poe & Pope, is in fact, looking to open 
offices in Wisconsin and west in 
McHenry County. The real estate firm has 
offices in Gumcc, Waukcgan and Antloch. 

Lawrence has his future goals set. 

"I'd like lo someday own my own com- 
pany," he said. 



Student loan defaulters lose 
1992 federal tax refunds 



minois student loan defaulters are con- 
tinuing to lose their federal tax refunds 
through the cooperadve efforts of three 
agencies. 

The Illinois Student Assistance Com- 
mission, the U.S. Department of Educa- 
tion and the Internal Revenue Service have 
teamed up for the eighth consecutive year. 
As of May 7, 1993, this successful pro- 
gram has withheld $11 million in 1992 
federal tax refunds from 13,161 individu- 
als. 

IS AC has worked closely with the two 
federal agencies to collect defaulted student 
loans through the offset of federal tax re- 
funds. Borrowers not paying on their de- 
faulted student loans were notified last fall 
that their refunds would be withheld 
unless satisfactory repayment 
arrangements were made with IS AC. 

Loans not being paid were assigned to die 
U.S. Department of Education for 
certification lo the Internal Revenue 
Service for offset. 



In 1992, ISAC mailed notices to 
76,153 borrowers notifying diem of ihe 
possibility that their 1992 tax refunds 
would be withheld. Of those, 63,050 were 
certified for offset "ISAC is committed to 
pursuing defaulted student loan borrowers. 
This successful program is just one exam- 
ple of that' commitment," said ISAC 
spokesperson Bob Clement. Total offsets 
of Illinois' defaulted borrowers since the 
inception of ihe. tax offset program total 
S68.3 million. 

While many defaulters arc willing to, 
and do, repay their student loans, "the off- 
set program has gained Uie attention of 
those borrowers who have ignored past ef- 
forts of ISAC's collections staff," com- 
mented Art Bilski, ISAC's Director of 
Claims and Collections. Borrowers who 
need assistance in repaying their loans or 
want to establish a satisfactory repayment 
arrangement should contact an account 
rcprescntaUve at 1-800-WEHELP2 (1-800- 
934-3572), Monday through Friday from 
8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 



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Friday. Juno 4, 1993 



iqkoilanct Kowf papers 15 



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Lakeland Newspapers' BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 









Real Estate Personnel 




Virginia Vasey 

Virginia Vasey of Poe and 
Poe Inc. Realtors in Grayslake has 
been recognized as the top pro- 
ducer in sales for 1992, She is a 
veteran of 15 years in real estate 



and has consistently been a top 
produceri specializing in residen- 
tial propectjes. 

Dana Meacham 

Dana Meacham has joined 
Century 21 Mid- West, Inc. in Ver- 
non Hills as a realtor associate. 
Previously, she had been an ac- 
count executive with Herman 
Miller and Hawoith, Inc. where 
she also did cotnmercial design 
wock, Meacham lives in ihc Boul- 
der's subdivision in Giunee with 
her husband, Scott and two chil- 
dien, Blake and Taylor. 

John Milligan 

John Milligan has joined the 
sales staff of Century 21 Kretiser 
and Seller in LibertyviUe. A native 



of New Zealand, he's held execu- 
tive positions in marketing with 
IBM and Burroughs (New 
Zealand) prior to starting his own 
direct marketing firm. Milligan is 
specializing in new and existing 
residential properties throughout 
Lake County. He and his wife 
Katherine reside in LibertyviUe. 

Nancy Kreuser 

LibertyviUe resident and Cen* 
tury 21 Kreuser and Seller sales 
associate Nancy Kreuser posted 
five sales totaling over S1.2 mil- 
lion during the month of April. She 
is a former LibertyviUe Trustee 
and Gerk and is active in the Con- 
dell Hospital Auxiliary, St. Joseph 
Church and —.any other organiza- 
tions. 



Two model homes at Stonebrook 
featured in 1993 Tour of Homes 



Two model homes at Stonebrook, a 
popular golf course community in 
Gumee, will be featured as entries in the 
1993 Lake County Tour of Homes to be 
held from June 19 to 27. 

Stonebrook, which is being developed 
by Gumee-based Westfield Homes, in- 
cludes 240 single-family homes, 154 
townhouses and 68 condominiums. The 
single-family Hampton and the Eaton 
townhome will be highlighted in this 
year's Tour of Homes. 

The Lake County Tour of Homes is 
an annual event sponsored by the Home 
Builders Assn. of Lake County to spot- 
light some of the outstanding home val- 
ues available throughout the area. West- 
field Homes, a major residential develop- 
ment company in the Lake County area 
for more than 12 years, is a regular partic- 
ipant in the Tour of Homes. 



According to Robert Siuda, senior vice 
president of Westfield Homes, the Lake 
County Tour of Homes provides an excel- 
lent opportunity for prospective home 
buyers to become better acquainted with 
Stonebrook and other communities on the 
tour. 

"Stonebrook combines family-oriented 
homes at attainable prices in a scenic, 
convenient location," said Siuda. "The 
Lake County Tour of Homes enables visi- 
tors to appreciate the excellent qualify of 
life Stonebrook and Lake County have to 
offer." 

The 200-acre community will have a 
total of 462 homes with an 18-hole golf 
course as a focal poinL The course is 
scheduled to open in 1994 and will be 
owned and operated by the Village of 
Gumee. 




Live Q^our (DreanC 

^Tom your BaCcony decfiyoti ivatch the morning 
sun catcfi the rippCes on the Cal<:^, O^ou hear the 
Breeze in the trees and the water BuBBting over 
the BouCders into the ponds. 

Private (ak^ frontage and Beaches, ..mature trees.., 
ponds andfat(s.,.%iAnding streets and cid-de-sats... 
a Beautifut maintenance-free environment.. .ait are 

part of the dfestyte aiuait- 
ing you at Mystic Cove. 

Mystic Cove is a seclud- 
ed enclave of distinctive 
homes nestCedon the shores 
ofLal(eJ^ntiach. 



RESERVATIONS NOW 

BEING ACCEPTED FOR 

CHOICE WATERFRONT 

AND HILLSIDE 

HOMESITES. 

HOMES WITH LOTS 

START AT $259,000. 



'Each home-site has Been carefully plan- 
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viezus. The homes themseCves comBine 
unique e7(terior designs zoith' 
spacious and imaginative Ji yix/r^T^lx^ 
floor pCans. iVlYijIlC 

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Flood insurance needed 
for flood damage claims 



The Illinois DepL of Insurance, in co- 
operation with the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA), is warning 
Illinois residents not to depend on their 
homeowners insurance policies to cover 
flood damage claims. 

"Unfortunately, many individuals and 
businesses mistakenly rely on their prop- 
erty policies to insure them against flood 
losses and do not realize until it is too 
late that most types of water damage are 
not included, " said Insurance Director 
Stephen F. Selcke. 

Flood insurance is available in com- 
munities that participate in the federal 
government's National Flood Insurance 
Program and can be purchased through 
any licensed property/casualty insurance 
agent. Many private insurers also write 
flood insurance under arrangements with 
the Federal Insurance Administrator, 



A flood insurance policy covers only 
the dwelling or building, although addi- 
tional coverage can be purchased for con- 
tents as well. Each type of coverage car- 
ries a separate deductible even if the struc- 
ture and contents are both damaged in the 
same flood. Premiums vary depending on 
the location and risk exposure of the 
property. According to FEMA, annual 
premiums for property in a special flood 
hazard area average about $300 for 
$85,000 worth of coverage. 

Selcke said that although flood insur- 
ance is not cheap, anyone whose property 
is at risk for flood damage should care- 
fully weight the cost of the insurance 
against the potential financial loss. Not- 
ing that there is normally a five-day wait- 
ing period before the coverage takes effect, 
"it's a decision that shouldn't be post- 
poned until the flood waters are at one's 
door," he said. 



June real estate license classes 



The Century 21 Real Estate Academy 
has announced that five-week, pre-license 
salesperson courses beginning in June 
have been scheduled at various locations 
throughout the greater Chicago area. 

Roger Peake, regional director of Cen- 
tury 21 North Central, Inc.'s Metropolitan 
region, said classes arc scheduled to begin 
on the following dates: Jutie 14, Mondays 
and Wednesday, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at 
the Schaumburg Doubletree Hotel, 800 
National; June 21, Mondays and Wednes- 
days, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., at the Hol- 
iday Inn Northbrook, 2855 Milwaukee; 
June 22, Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 7 



to 10 p.m. at the Gumee Holiday Inn, 
6161 W.Grand. 

Successful completion of the salesper- 
son course will prepare students for the 
state exam, which is offered almost daily 
at various locations in the Chicago area. 
Home study is also available. All-day re- 
views, designed to help students with the 
state exam, are scheduled twice each 
month. 

The Century 21 Real Estate Academy 
offers continuing education courses at 11 
convenient locations. Information on any 
of the courses can be obtained by calling 
296-0410. Pre-registration is required for 
all classes. 







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}6 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, Juno 4. 1993 




Lakeland Newspapers' BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Business Personnel 




dress invcjtments typically used 
by individuals when invcJtiog for 
current taxable and tax-free in- 
come, prtservation of capital and 
long term growth. The aeminar 
starts with dtDDcr at 6 p.m. Resei- 
vations can be made by calling 
395-5444, 



Marc Lubkeman 

On Tuesday, June IS Marc 
Lubkeman of Edward D. Jones 
and Company will sponsor a free 
seminar titled "Understanding In- 
vestment Alternatives in a Low 
Interest Rate Environment." 
Lubkeman will discuss a variety 
of investment vehicles. His goal is 
to help clients understand invest- 
ment characteristics and provide 
realistic expectation. He wilt ad- 




R. Schwartzenberg 

The appointment of Robert 
Schwartzenberg, M.D., to the 



medical staff at Victory Memorial 
Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd., 
Waukegan, has been announced 
by WilTiam Woods, M.D., presi- 
dent of the Victory Medical Staff. 
pr.Schwartzcnberg's practice is 
in internal medicine. He com- 
pleted his internship and residency 
at Our Lady of Mercy Center, 
Bronx, N.y. Dr. Schwartzeaberg's 
office is at t03 S. Greealeaf, Suite 
J, Gurnee. 



Marlene Tanquilut 

The appointment of Marlene 
Tanquilut, M.D., to the medical 
staff at Victory Memorial Hospi- 
tal, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd., 
Waukegan has been announced 
by William Woods, M.D., presi- 
dent of the Victory Medical Staff. 
Dr. Tanquilut is board certified in 
pediatrics. She completed her in* 
temship at Central Luzon General 
Hospital in Pampanga, Philippines. 
She completCQ a residency at 
Meharry-Hubbard Hospital in 
Nashville, Tenn. She also com- 
pleted a residency at Cabnnt 
Medical Center in Chicago. Dr. 
Tanquilut's office is at 135 N. 
Greenleaf, Gurnee. 




Lake County business 
group plans meeting 



The Lake County Business Industry 
Education Consortium will hold its 11th 
annual meeting at the Country Squire in 
Grayslake on Friday, June 11. The lun- 
cheon meeting will begin at 12:30 p.m. 
The featured speaker will be Gordon 
Brown who is Chief of Staff to the Illi- 
nois State Board' of Education in Spring- 
field. Brown will speak on "Business and 
Education Partnerships" in Illinois. 

Teachers and community volunteers 



who have been working with the BIEC's 
students space simulation project will be 
recognized for their work in working with 
students. Local corporate sponsors who 
have been partners in the improvement of 
science, math and technology will also be 
recognized for their contributions. The 
meeting will conclude with the election of 
officers for the 1993-94 year. 

For information on the meeting call 
Jerry Gudauskas at 223-6681, ext. 242. 




Heritage 

4641 Grand Avenue 
Gurnee, IL 60031 



Office: 336-2600 

Fax: 249-6505 
Home: 356-6968 




Rick Broquet 



ThinkiDg of SeUing Your House? 

• What is llic market value? 

• How long will it take? 

• Is die house prepared to sell? 

• Wliat arc tlie costs? 



Thinking of Bu yin g a Home? 

• Qualified for a mortgage? 

• Wliat type of home? 

• Wliat ncigliborliood? 

• Wliat are tlic costs? 



CALL ME - If you arc asking these questions and want an answer. 

HELPING YOU REACH YOUR REAL 
ESTATE GOAL IS MY #1 OBJECTIVE 



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Congratulations 



Former Lake County Economrc Development Commission member Harry 
Dolan received the prestigious Charles E. deRivera Memorial Award from 
Sue deRivera in recognition of his economic development and community 
service. The award is presented annually to a person who reflects his 
energy, spirit and dedication towards the enhancement of Lake County's 
economic community. 



OPEN HOUSE 

22570 Washington St, Antioch, IL 
Sunday, June 6, 1993 11 am to 1 pm 

Exceptionally well cared for 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath 
colonial. Oversized kitchen/eating area overlooks fenced 
yard. 2 car garage. 1st floor laundry. Full unfinished 
basement. Lake rights, too! 

"^155,000 

Directions: Rt. 83 and 173 go east to Lincoln and south 
to Washington and east to sign. 

RE/MAX 

Advantage Your Host, 
RGalty ^'^^ Lombardo Forth 

1 532 Uke St., Antioch 395-7900 ext. 125 



SUMMER 1993 SEMINAR 



Investment 
Seminar 



'"UNDERSTANDING INVESTMENT ALTERNATIVES IN 
A LOW INTEREST RATE ENVIRONMENT" 




VfS^^ 




Antioch Golf Club 

Rte. 59 & Grass Lake Rd. 
Antioch, IL 

Tuesday, June 15 th 
6:00 p.m. 

INCLUDES DINNER 



Please Cull For 

Reservations 

395-5444 

CALL TODAY - SEATING IS LIMITED 





Marc Lubkeman 

Registered Representative 

434 Lake St. 

Antioch, IL 



S Edward D. Jones & Co. 

Membef New Yo*k Slock Exchange. Inc. and Securities Inveslof.Prolection Corporation 



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Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 17 






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'93 CHRYSLER LEBARON CONVERTIBLE 

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Lakeland Newspapers' BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 




Arbor Day fun 

An Arbor Day celebration at Spring Grove Elementary School, sponsored by 
Spring Grove State Bank, on May 7 concluded with the planting of a sixteen- 
foot Norwegian Maple tree at the school. Project Coordinator and Bank 
Manager Kathy Truax, along with State Bank officials Lee Brotcke and 
Stephen Mitchell, met with Superintendent Dr. Ron Erdmann (right) to help 
Grethen Krause plant the tree. 



General BusinessFile on trial- 
basis at Lake Villa library 



The Public Services Department at the 
Lake Villa District Library announced the 
service addition of the database General 
BusinessFile, which will be available for 
the next two months on the InfoTrac 
System. 

General BusinessFile is a reference 
tool covering business, management, 
company and industry information. 
Business periodicals, newspapers, 
newswires, a business directory and the 
Investex database of company and industry 
analyst reports are integrated into one all- 
inclusive database to provide current 
coverage of all aspects of the business 
world. 

Patrons can: survey the outlook for a 
complete industry, identify major players; 
search specific companies and industries to 
maximize employment opportunities; find 
current information on new technologies 
and products; research the latest 
management theories and look up current 
financial status of companies and trends in 
money management. 

The database allows patrons to search 
more than three years of issues of over 
700 business, management and trade 



publications. Directory information and 
the full text of newswire releases for over 
100,000 private and public companies are 
also included. 

Abstracts and the full text of reports 
and forecasts on over 11,000 U.S. and 
foreign companies, prepared by leading 
investment banks and brokerage firms, are 
available through Investexl, all integrated 
into the General BusinessFile. 

Patrons simply sit at the computer 
terminal, type in the subject they wish lo 
search and press a button to see a listing 
of articles on the subject, directory 
information and company and industry 
reports. In addition, the InfoTrac program 
will suggest other related topics that the 
user may wish to view. 

The new reference system is always 
up-to-date because a new database with 
indexing of the latest issues is delivered 
monthly. The database is recorded by laser 
on compact disc, which is similar to those 
used for audio recordings. 

For more information on this new 
service, contact the library's Public 
Services Department, 356-7711. 



Chicago Title and Trust Company 
elects MacKimm as director 










Margaret P. MacKimm 



Margaret P. MacKima has been 
elected to the combined Board of Duectors 
of Chicago Title and Trust Company and 
Chicago Title Insurance Company. 

MacKimm's professional career in- 
cludes 17 years with Kraft, Inc. and Kraft 
General Foods, Inc. from which she re- 
tired in 1989 after serving as senior vice 
president, communications. She cunenUy 
serves as a director of Woolworth Corpo- 
ration and E.I. du Pont de Nemours & 
Company. 

MacKimm is also widely active as a 
community leader. She is perhaps best 
known for her contributions as an execu- 
tive committee member of the Chicago 
Community Trust, where she chairs the 
Health and Education Committee. She is 
a director of the Worid Press Institute and 
of the Chicago North Shore Senior Cen- 
ter; and a member of the 4-H National 
Advisory Committee after havmg served 
as National 4-H Council Trustee for 13 
years. 

MacKimm is a member of both the 
Commercial Club of Chicago and the 
Economic Club of Chicago. She received 
a BA degree in English from the College 
of William and Mary. 



} 8 lakeland New»papor* 



Friday, Jun© 4, 1993 



fjui 




:??5f-*^-'r=yw.; . 5^>_v( -fr7.n 



GET "IT" OFF 
YOUR CHEST 

(708)223-8073 



I^IPSERVICE 

IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWNr 



(Continued from page 6) 

Good Cops 

Not all cops are bad, I would guess 99.9% of police 
arc good. My car broke down and a I ake County 
Sheriff helped push my car, single handedly. lliank 
you, whoever you were in car 627. - 

A Big Thanks 

Thank you Bob Hendrickson for your wonderful 
pictures of Calvary Christian School. Also, a thanks to 
all the area businesses that helped out. 

Pagan Holiday 

I find it very upsetting that prayer is not allowed in 
the schools but teachers celebrate Earth Day. Earth Day 
is a pagan ritual promulgated by environmental wackos, 
the media, and ungodly pagans. It has been proven by 
Rush Limbaugh that there is no ozone hole or 
environmental problems. 

Home Junk Home 

I am from unincorporated Prairie View. I too want to 
know why the planning and zoning board is allowing 
all of this horrible development. It looks like a 
junkyard. There are buses jacked up on cinder blocks 
and used as storage sheds. It looks terrible. 

Half-baked 

To "Go Bake A Cake", that trustee has done more for 
Lindenhurst than anyone ever before. The person who 
called this In should go bake a cake yourself! 




I^akeland 

Xewspapcrs 



Fish Story 



I am from Fox Lake and there is something fishy 
going on here. The current mayor's best friend is 
allowing a trailer with advertisements to be on his 
property on Route 12. This, to me, is very fishy. I 
would like the trailer removed because no other business 
in town is allowed to advertise like this. 

Thank You 

Big thanks to the Grayslake Lions for the gazebo they 
put up in the park in Grayslake. Great work. 

More Sirens 

I think Antioch should discontinue the use of all 
sirens. It appears that residents do not know the 
difference between the fire, rescue, and tornado sircns. 

Confused Motives 

Despite what he said in the Tribune, Mr. B's real 
intention was to shut down the iceless hockey program. 
Listen, you confiise the desire to piay with the ability 
to play. If parents cannot understand your motives, 
how can you expect children to? You are exposing your 
Down's syndrome child to a lot of pain. As a parent, 
you should be ashamed. 



Blood Sport 



This is to all the people who did not vote "yes" to the 
Andoch High School. Maybe you have children who 
are not in high school or just about to graduate. 
Remember your vote when you are senior citizens and 
the kids deprived of any extra-curricular activity use you 
as the extra-curricular activity. Think about it. 

Above The Law 

I just found out that a certain person is still dumping 
grease down the village sewer. Even worse, he is 
blaming it on another restaurant. Come on, you have 
been red tagged. Do you think you are above the law? 
Come on Round Lake Heights, let the chicken man go. 

Wife Woes 

What would you do if you had an ex-wife who drives 
by your house on a daily basis? She also harasses my 
new wife. Does anyone have any suggestions? Please 
call in. And, keep it legal. 

Motel Hell 

The Avon Motel looks like motel hell. Get rid of it. 
It is an eyesore. It is the first thing you see when you 
enter Hrunesville, 

Dog Gone 

Apparently there are ignorant people who live all 
through Lake County. I live in Fox Lake and have the 
same problem with barking dogs. I just paid $130,000 
for a house in a supposedly quiet subdivision. 
However, I get to listen to barking dogs from dawn to 

10:30 p.m. 

Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



Whatever Happened 

I am fi-om Lake Zurich and want to know what . 
happened to ex-mayor Kay? And, what is the deal with 
the license plates? 

That's Who 

To the person who writes asking about Robocop in 
Antioch High School. He is a ient-a-cop who is 
affectionately called Robocop because he is an ex- 
Chicago policeman. He is a very nice man who lives 
in Antioch Township. We love him. I am an Antioch 
student. 

Define Murder 

Hey "Examine Yourself, how can you murder 
something that is not breathing? I'd love to hear how! 
Please define murder for me. 



V/on'tPay 



HBO recently had a program indicating that teens 
should not need to get parental pennission to have 
abortions, Itwas.called "Lifestyles, Families in 
Crisis". I canceled my subscription to HBO. I will not 
pay to promote abortion. 

PleasejMow 

Will the person who was an unsuccessful candidate 
for Town Supervisor and bragged about.buying'property 
in Felter's Subdivision please come and cut down your 
tall weeds and grass? 

Rained Out 

I just want to thank US Cable for their great service. 
Last week my wife and I were trying to watch TV and 
the cable went out again. Every time it rains, the cable 
(Continued on page 20) 








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LIPSERVICE 

IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 



(Continued from page 19) 

goes out. When the weather is bad outside, I want to 
stay home and watch TV. But, that is just not possible 
I pay over $25 a month for this pleasure. I live in Fox 
Lake. 

Iceless Problem 

I want to applaud all the parents in the Antioch 
iceless hockey league. This was our first year with the 
program and we think it is great. I was disappointed to 
learn that one set of parents could jeopardize the entire 
program. 

Editors Note: We have received numerous 
calls about the iceless hockey situation. We 
would love to print all of them, but 
unfortunately, the calls are extremely 
lengthy. Please keep your comments short, 
concise, and to the point. Otherwise, please 
consider sending in a letter to the editor. 

Thanks Lions 

I think we owe the Grayslake Lions Club a big 
thanks for the gazebo. 

Bad Temporary Neighbors 

I am from Antioch and would like to scream. All of 
you summer people, who come up here and think you 
are in some open field somewhere can just go to hell. 
AH holiday weekend long I was woken up by car 
alarms, fire crackers, whooping, hollering, and very 
loud boats. You are not alone here! 

Stroke Of Luck 

I am calling about an article about how Murphy 
School has had no accidents in 21 years. I think it is 
fantastic that this is true. However, I also think it has 
only been a stroke of luck. I drop my kids off there 
everyday and I have never seen such gross negligence in 
my life. Crossing guards are laughing arid shoving. I 
think they do a poor job. 

White All Right 

I am white and want to know why anyone would come 
down to North Chicago to clean it up for you? Do it 
yourself. 

Sinner 

The person who put their 1 1 year old on the phone to 
talk about abortion conmiitted a sin. Do you reaUze 
you are using your own child to promote your beliefs? 
You aiB teaching your child bigotry and prejudice. 
That, my friend, is the real sin. 

Official No Show 

I think it is pretty sad to have a Miss Fox Lake 
contest and have no village officials attend. Our 
community should work together. It was sad for the 
community and for the girls in attendance. 

Let's Be Bums 

Hey "Kicked Out", when are you going to realize how 
much we can profit ft"om the riverboat casino? We are 
all going to end up bums because there are no jobs or 
money in this town. Shut up, deadbeats. 



Hop A Horse 



Our officials are not bums. You may have money 
but I don't. If it was up to the ARC, we would still be 
riding horseback. 

No Ticket 

I wrote "Unwritten Code" not "Shift Party" and I do 
not believe what "Shift Party" said. But, I do believe in 
what I said about cops having an unwritten code. And, 
guess what, I have never gotten a ticket! 

Saved The Bacon 

I am calling from Antioch and feel that the Rescue 
Squad siren is part of Antioch. My family operated a 
hotel across the street for over 30 years and no one 
. complained. People should realize that the rescue squad 
saves a lot of people's bacon. 

Friend Of Cat 

I am a neighbor of the owners of Wally the cat. I am 
sick and tired of people saying they are horrible people. 
They are wonderful neighbors who take care of all the 
cats that wander into their yard. If you people had your 
pets fixed, there would not be so many strays in tlie 




Lakeland 

Ncu'spapcrs 



first place. And, how long do you think it takes to fire 
three shots at a moving cat? The soap opera remark 
was just cruel. 

Take A Vocation 

Let's make educators sacrifice. They need to dig into 
their pockets to educate other people's children. Cut 
their salaries. Make them work longer hours. Force 
them to give up retirement benefits and insurance 
coverage. Heck, it is their vocation. 

Floating Tax Break 

I am a homeowner in Antioch Township, west of the 
village. The people opposed to the casino are off base. 
The only way we are going to clean up the Chain, get a 
tax break, or create jobs is through the riverboat I 
hate change too, but I can't take my taxes anymore. 



The Wally Saga Continues 

Don't blame the call Cats do not harm people. They 
are very independent and do their own thing. Wally or 
any other cat did not deserve the injury he received! 
There are cowardly people out there who love to hurt 
animals. You, my dear "Get A he&sh" sound like one 
of them. 

Work Nearby 

Don't attack Jim Fields because his daughter wants to 
work on the riverboat. I also will be working on that 
riverboat, if they hire me. I would love to work near to 
where I live for a change. Wouldn't you? 

Another Hot Volunteer 

This is in regards to "Burning Mad". I too tried to 
(Continued on page 32) 



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20 takoiand Newspapers 



Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



'"V.;r. ,-*■■-■■ '',t . . ii;.,f'--ji 



fi(<'r<:'i..:r^fiy 




Health of indoor plants signals air safety level 




Indoor plants keep 
healthy and active with 
waterings that include 
mtdtiple vitamins and 
hormones have been 
found to continue normal 
processes that include de- 
stroying air pollutants in 
"tight buildings." 

This interior pollution 
has been charged by the 
U. S. Environmental Pro- 
tection Administration 
with 26,000 annual cancer 
deaths and millions of 
cases of other Illnesses. 

When the plants' own 
health is protected by the 
vitamins -hormones sup- 
plement, their visible ac- 
tivity signals that thoy are 
not being overcome by 
the harmful vapors 
emanating from struc- 
tures and furnishings. 
Instead, they arc vanning 
over them, clearing them 



away for a safer indoor 
environment. 

Although experts have 
used this inexpensive, 
easy and non-toxic 
formula, called 
SUPERthrive™, for over 
fifty years, to keep Indoor 
and other plants healthy, 
it has only become 
important for the health 
of humans since the 
proliferation of 
closed-windowed build- 
ings and energy-tight res- 
idences. 

Clinical ecologists have 
found that the primary 
damaging substances in 
this "tight- bull ding syn- 
drome" are benzene, 
formaldehyde £md 
trichloroethylene. The 
higher the buildings' con- 
tent of newly-made parts, 
partitions, decorating ma- 
terials or furnishings, the 



higher the likelihood of 
reacting sicknesses, it is 
reported. 

Researchers have dis- 
covered that actively 
growing plants can do 
away with toxic gases. 
They do this through the 
leaves, the roots, and even 
via the beneficial nd- 
cro -organisms in the soil. 

Horticultural scientists 
say that enough help may 
be provided by as few as 
two typical good -sized 
foot and-a -half-high 
healthily-grov^lng plants 
per ten feet by ten feet 
square space. 

The National Aeronau- 
■ tics and Space Adminis- 
tration, NASA, has been in 
particular need of over- 
coming these problems. 
Therefore, they joined 
with the Associated Land- 
scape Contractors of 




Grasscycling returns valuable 
nutrients to Mother Earth 



Is it okay to distribute 
grass clippings on the 
lawn? What are the bene- 
fits or drawbacks? Lake 
County lawn experts claim 
grass clippings are 85 per- 
cent water, so they deteri- 
orate quickly and don't 
add to a thatch build up. 
About 20 percent of the 
nitrogen is returned to the 
soil. It's been estimated 
that a season's worth of 



grass clippings is equal to 
one application of a 
commercial fertilizer. 

One key to trouble-free 
"grasscycling," an industry 
term meaning recycling 
grass clippings, is short 
clips. The one-third rule is 
to cut only one-third of 
the grass blade at each 
mowing. 

Some people prefer to 
collect clippings occa- 



sionally for a compost pile 
in order to create en- 
riched earth for gardening 
and landscaping projects. 
And it's always a good 
idea to remove tree leaves 
regularly in fall to help the 
grass store food and pre- 
pare for winner. Chopped 
leaves can be used as 
mulch around landscape 
plantings or In a com- 
poster. 



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America in sponsoring a 
study by Dr. B.C. Wolver- 
ton, which established, 
through dosed -chamber 
experiments, the effec- 
tiveness of actively grow- 
ing plants in relieving the 
air of the pollutants. 

However, a host of addi- 
tional problems 
appeared when real use 
of the rooms by humans 
occurred, and 
emphasized the need to 
protect the 

plants themselves with 
the normalizing vitamins- 
hormones nutritional 
support, to keep them 
working for their human 
"friends." 

It turned out that two 
main classes of problems 
introduced by people's 
presence put many more 
stresses upon the air and 
plants. First, without 
natural ventilation, 
people make their own 
contributions to 
atmospheric impurity. 
Their, clothing, packaging 
materials and their other 
manufactured articles do, 
too. 

Further, interiorscapers 
observe many other 
stresses upon plants in 
peopled places. These 
commonly include: Peo- 
ple knocking off 



branches; demanding 
that plants be placed in 
front of air conditioners 
or heaters or in too much 
sunlight or too -dark 
locations; or they 
extra-water or 
over -fertilize plants. 
Over-fertilization is 
identified by University of 
Florida foliage plant ex- 
perts as being the main 
killer. 

Without the SU- 
PERthrive support, plants 
often start to die Imme - 
diately under such 
stresses, failing to metab- 
olize out the pollutants, 
and finally may need re- 
placement as early as 
three months later. 

But the largest chains of 
buildings and of indoor, 
plant maintainers say the 
SUPERthrive use over- 
comes all these problems, 
keeping their plants 
healthy "until they grow 
out of the buildings." 

It is understood that 
this provides an invalu- 
able signal of progress to- 
ward achieving superior 
air safety. 

This 50 vitamins- 
hormones formula is 
completely unlike any 
other, although it is said 
to be common for simple 
and ineffective substitutes 
to be offered, claiming to 




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BeauUrul Selection of Annual!), BaAkets 
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PERENNIAL 

OF 
THE WEEK 

HOSTA 

Several Vutetles 



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be "like" it. ^ 


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It was used by every \ 




major motion picture ■ 


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studio as far back as 1940, '\ 


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to overcome their stresses. ' 


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SUPERtlirive works by 




providing ready-made ., 




carbon-hydrogen-oxygen ,' 


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substances that the plants ,' 


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need to make. 
Certified non-toxic, SU- 


^^^H 


PERtlirive has been used 


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in bulk sizes, by thou- j 


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sands of government and 


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university experts for over ' 


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a half century. It is the ere - ' 


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ation of internation- 


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ally-recognized bio- 


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chemist Dr. Joiin k. 


Thomson, who still . 


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makes it 


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For more information, 


(H 


send a stamped, 


V 


self-addressed busi- 


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ness-size envelope to Vi- 


H 


tamin Institute, Dept IP 


, H 


Box 230. North HoUy- , 


1 


wood, CA 91603. 


■. 









■A 



Filday,Jun©4, 1993 



Lakviond Newspapers 21 



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Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Container gardening offers myriad of planting possibilities 



You don't need a yard 
to have a garden to be 
proud of. Container gar- 
dening offers a myriad of 
planting possibilities for 
the patio, deck, balcony, 
window box, roof top — 
you name it And even if 
you do have a yard, don't 
limit your gardening to 
ground level. Take it from 
the experts at the Profes- 
sional Plant Growers As- 
sociation, whose mem- 
bers provide gardeners 
with potted and bedding 
plants: Plants can go 
anywhere that soil, water, 
light and imagination can 

go- 
Flowers are blooming 
in everything from the 
traditional clay pot to ele- 
gant, handmade contain- 
ers, wheel barrows, cast 
iron kettles and wooden 
wine casks cut in half. 
Barrel containers can be 
half buried on their sides 
with soil mounded inside 
so it looks as If the flowers 
are "spilling" out Decks 
can be built with win- 
dow-box railings or cubi- 
cles to cover large pots. 
Use your imagination to 
plant what you fmd-an 
old stone barbecue grill 
cooking with coleus, an 
abandoned sand box with 
castles of celosia, an out- 
grown swing set swinging 
with hanging gerani- 
ums — ^Transform a "white 



elephant" In your yard 
into a blooming focal 
point. 

Containers not only let 
you enjoy plants in 
non-yard locations, they 
also give you the flexibility 
to move and change. If 
you leave plants in their 
original pots and just set 
them inside their decora- 
tive containers, they can 
be easily replaced with 
fresh substitutes. If you fill 
the planter with decora- 
tive mulch to cover the pot 
rims, your plants look as if 
they were planted directly 
into the container. You 
can use this mobile 
method to keep 
sun -loving plants in a 
shady area. Buy two sets of 
plants and rotate them 
every week or two, so they 
get enough sun to thrive. 
You can also rotate plants 
just for the fun of it For 
seasonal variety try color- 
ful, fragrant hyacinths, 
crocuses, daffodils and 
tulips in spring, edged by 
bury the pots in the gar- 
den where they should 
bloom again at their 
normal spring season. 
Then you can unearth the 
pots and rotate them 
again. 

Replace the faded 
bulbs with a dramatic 
summer annual such as 
geraniums. Move the 
pansics or violas to a cen- 



terpiece cluster on your 
patio table and replace 
them with dangling vinca 
vines around the gerani- 
ums. For planters in shady 
areas, big pots of 
Impatiens are an impres- 
sive sight In the fall, the 
geraniums can make way 
for mums with their vari- 
ety of colors and flower 
forms. 

You can add another 
dimension to your planter 
by using a small, woody 
ornamental plant as the 
focal point surrounded by 
annuals -for example, a 
lush, pink azalea floating 
on a sea of white impa- 
tiens-or a dark, green yew 
encircled by red wax be- 
gonias. Ask your garden 
center about the hardi- 
ness of such shrubs. If they 
won't survive your 
climate's winters, they will 
have to be overwintered 
in a greenhouse. Did you 
know that many 
commercial ranges now 
rent out space? 

. Let your imagination 
run wild with planter 
possibilities-but don't 
forget the practical con- 
siderations. Containers 
have special water needs 
due to their limited size. 
First, they dry out more 
quickly than garden beds. 
This is particularly true of 



and small containers. 
Check watering needs 
daily. 

Second, containers 
require drjUnage to pre- 
vent waterlogged roots. 
The best alternative is 
holes in the bottom of the 
container with a layer of 
burlap to keep soil from 
sifting through. Better 
than nothing is a layer of 
coarse gravel or broken 
pots at the bottom of the 
pot with burlap over the 
gravel to keep soil out so 
water can drain to the 
spaces between the 
stones. Another option is 
to place a drainage hole 
container inside a larger, 
decorative container -but 
make sure the inner pot is 
elevated so It doesn't sit in 
the water that has drained 
into the larger pot. 

When choosing plants 
for your container, con- 
sider the following; 

• Light — Most flowers 
are sun -lovers. If you're 
decorating a shady spot, 
try Impatiens, begonias, 
coleus, browallia, fuchsia 



or torenia. Chccic pl^tit 
care tags and buy vntfci 

your location In nuixcl-or 
rotate containers *** a. 
sunny spot as suggested 

above. , . ,, 

• Height-Put t^U 

plants in the cente*" of 
containers vleweo from 
allsldes, orthcrcat of 
ones viewed froiO One 
side only. Use sliojter 
plants in the middle and 
low or trailing vanities at 

the edge. 

• Distance— 
One-color-onc-vanety 
planters malco a arajnatlc 
showing even wn^ti 
viewed from af^* Combi- 
nation plantings of several 
different varieties taake 
for up -close Interest, 

When plantli^S your 
container, folioW these 

tips: 

• Use a soilless plant- 
ing medium. Garclen soil 
is too heavy for containers 
and may carry li^^ects and 

disease. 

• Water before plant- 
ing. Mix until the soil is 



to about a half-inch of tiie 
pot rim. 

• Check watering 
needs dally. Containeis 
dry faster tiian garden 
beds. 

• Turn planters for 
symmetrical growth. 
Plants "lean" toward the 
light Keep the sunny side 
from outgrowing the 
shady side by turning pots 
periodically . 

• Fertilize llghtiy but 
frequently. Use a water 
soluble plant food accord- 
ing to label directions. 
Make sure it is well di- 
luted or it may "burn" your 
plants. 

Time to start casting 
about for the perfect 
planter for your non-yard 
garden spot Your local 
garden center has loads of 
alternatives-those that are 
decorative on their own 
and others that are just 
the right size to fit Into 
that wicker cTialr without a 
scat, that brass umbrella 
stand, that wooden apple 
crate — ^You know what it 



uniformly moist ^j^^d fiUed | is; plant it! 



In and out the windows 



What are windows for? 
To look In-to look out-to 
look at... what? The neigh - 



porous, clay pots, hanging bor's garage? Boring! You 



baskets, plants in full sun 



TML,WET GRASS? 
NOPROBLEM. 



Model20436 

21 " Recycles n Super Pro* Mower 

5 hp Briggs &. Siraiton Engine 

Ciuiraitteed To Siarr 2 years 




INTRODUCING THE TORO RECYCIER' II MOWER. 

• Only llie Recycler^Ii mower has the extra culling power you 
need to mow through tall, wet grass. 

• Gives you a clean-looking lawn, even in tough conditions. 

• With the exclusive GTS engine. Guaranteed to 
start on the first or second pull, or Toro will fix it 
free for up lo 2 years. 

^ Only your Toro dealer has the Recycler"!! mower. 



lORQ 



Havetft you done without aToio long enou^?' 

Rowland's Power Equipment, Inc. - 



200W 
(1 block 
Mon.,Tue8.,Thur8.p Fri. e^, 
Wed. 8-12, Sat 8^ 

1993 The Toro Company 




(708)381-1084 



can improve your view by 
adding plants-inside and 
put an outside window 
box brimming with bright 
blooms-with an Inside 
windowsill garden of pot- 
ted plants. Tills is a win- 
dow well worth a second 
look-in or out. The Profes- 
sional Plant Growers As- 
sociation, whose mem- 
bers supply both indoor 
and outdoor blooming 
plants, offers these tips to 
transform your boring 
windows into showcases 
of blooming beauty with a 
little ingenuity and a trip 
to the lumber yard. 

To make skinny in- 
door sills wide enough to 
hold fat plants, buy a 
board as long as your ex- 
isting sill and wide 
enough to accommodate 
your favorite plants so the 
leaves don't touch the 
vidndow. (This can dam- 
age plants when the 
panes get winter cold.) 
Place the board on top of 
the existing sill and 
secure it with screws. 

To support this shelf, 
use two 1 X 2" boards, cut 
at a 45-degree angle at 
each end. Screw one end 
under the 

away-from-the-window 
edge of your new shelf; 
screw the other end into 
the wall. The sturdiest 
choice for the wall is a 
"butterfly" toggle bolt 
which has "wings" that 
open up inside the wall to 
hold it securely after it's 
screwed in. You may be 
able to fmd metal shelf 
brackets at your local 
hardware store that could 
substitute for these 1x2" 
board supports. 

While you're at the 
hardware store, check out 
the pre -fab shelving sys- 
tems that use metal strips 
with holes for support 
brackets. A strip on either 
side of your window, lets 



you add shelves ^u the 
way up for a tot^Uy 
plant-fiJled winQow. 

As for the outside win- 
dow box-It's Just a box the 
width of yourv^'itidow-not 
too difficult for a. handy 
do -it-yoursclfcr tc» man- 
age. Be sure to Uiclude 
sturdy supports under- 
neath. Ifyoujn^t have a 
specific bulldlr^g plan, 
check your local library 
for books that specialize 
in window gardens. 

Plastic plantar-liners, 
available frofH local gar- 
den centers, ^^ increase 
the life of your \vijidow 
box-althougli YQu can 
plant directly Uito the box 
itself. You cart ^so leave 
plants in their pots so you 
can change tl^etn. easily as 
the season progresses. 
Take your plaij^ and mea- 
surements (of both your 
window and th^ pots or 
liner) to your local lumber 
yard. 

When buyU^g wood 
and hardware, think 
weatherproof. Your dealer 
can help you choose 
woods that wiU last, such 
as cedar and redwood, or 
those treated for outdoor 
use. Ask If the wood 
preservatives Used are 
toxic to plants. Using a 
plastic liner will reduce 
plants' exposiire to this 
possible hazard. 

Don't forget the 
all-important drainage 
holes. This Is especially 
Important outdoore 
where Motliet Nature can 
dump in an extra supply 
of water whcti you don't 
really need It. 
Waterlogged roots make 
for sickly plants-rather 
than the blooming 
beauties youVe planned 
for your window 
showcase. 

On the other hand, 
make sure plants get 
enough water. Like all 
outdoor containers, win- 
dow boxes c^n dry out 






22 Lakeland Newspapers 



quickly. Check the soU 
daily and when the sur- 
face feels dry, water thor- 
oughly until the water 
drips out of those 
drainage holes. You may 
be able to roll up 
self-storhig screens and 
water from indoors. 

After your set -up Is 
complete, comes the fim 
part choosing the plants. 
Start by evaluating the 
light at your outdoor win- 
dow-box site. If it's sunny 
most of the day, you can 
choose from the wide as- 
sortment of sun-loving 
annual flowers such as 
geraniums, marigolds, 
petunias, verbenas and 
zinnias. If It's suimy half 
the day or less, choose 
from such shady favorites 
as impatiens, begonias, 
coleus, lobelias, pansies 
and torenias. Many gar- 
den centers have plants 
labeled according to light 
requirements. 

If you keep your win- 
dow-box plants In their 
pots, you can rotate color 
throughout the season, 
moving from spring bulbs 
to summer annuals to 
autumn mums, corn- 
flowers, pansies, snap- 
dragons, sweet alyssum, 
flowering cEtbbage or kale. 
These frost-tolerant 
plants can thrive all 
winter in southern 
climates. 

Indoors, choose from 
a variety of long -lasting 
foliage plants as a green 
"frame" to set off the col - 
orful flowering plants out- 
side. Light is a factor for 
your indoor garden shelf, 
too. Unshaded south- 
ern-facing windows are 
the brightest Outdoor 
shade from nearby 
trees -or that neighbor's 
garage -can create 
low -light windows. Many 
foliage plants are tagged 

according to their light 
requirements. Ask at your 
garden center. 






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Friday. June 4, 1993 



■<t»p<*TiM-j*m 



'^ui-Tfr,':'^^--:-; vs—t:rV;:fs 



r^'- 




New tree care products help trees thrive 



As tall and strong as 
some trees may appear, 
they weren't dways that 
way. They once were 
young saplings struggling 
for sunrivral against the el- 
ements and, in many 
cases, man and his many 
machines. In recent years, 
lawn and garden manu- 
facturers have sought 
ways to give young trees a 
fighting chance to ward 
off insects, disease and 
animals, as well as the 
ravages of winds and 
drought during the spring 
and summer months. 

Another goal has been 
to design products that 
physically protect grow- ■ 
Ing trees from damage 
caused by lawn mowers 
and string trimmers. As a 
result, a number of new 



products specially created 
to meet these challenges 
are now available at local 
hardware stores and lawn 
and garden centers. 
Protecting young trees 

Damage from lawn 
mowers and string trim- 
mers is the number one 
cause of young tree death. 
Newly -planted trees and 
those only a year or two 
old do not have a thick 
bark to protect them. 
Consequently, cuts and 
gashes leave them vul- 
nerable to insects and of- 
ten-fatal fungal diseases. 

A simple solution to 
this situation is a new 
product called BarkGard; 
A plastic shield about 
eight inches high, Bark- 
Gard installs easily by 
coiling it around thei tree 



and serves as a physical 
barrier between the 
growing tree and trim- 
mers and mowers. The 
product's natural brown 
color reflects light away 
from the trunk Emd blends 
in well with developing 
bark. Specially-designed 
holes in the plastic enable 
the tree to "breathe." 
Protecting the soU 

One way to guarantee 
healthy tree growth is to 
make sure the soil around 
its roots is healthy. 
Homeowners and profes- 
sional landscapers alike 
often create a well arotmd 
a growing tree. This will 
ensure that the tree does- 
n't compete with grass or 
weeds for vitak nutrients 
and water. Begin by 
preparing the planting 



GOOD 
EATING! 

Whether you grow 

Tomatoes in 

attractive tubs 

on your patio or 

in your garden».there's 

nothing better than 

the flavor of a 

HOMEGROWN 

TOMATO! 



:^rx. 



<i®>i^ 



Leiders 



GARDEN GREENERY INC. 



Phone: 223-2422 



Hours 

Mon. Thru Fri., 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Located 2 Miles 

North of Grayslake 

On The Comer of 

Rte. 83 & Lake Street 



area. Depending on the 
size of the tree, the plant- 
ing site should be at least 
six inches deep (or the 
depth of the root ball if 
planting a new tree) and 
amended with absorbent 
builder's sand within two 
to five feet of the trunlc 
Strips of a landscape fab- 
ric, such as WeedBlock, 
should then be placed 
over the soli. Then, in a 
circular pattern around 
the edges, lay bricks down 
to hold the fabric in place 
Cut away any excess fabric 
with a Icnife or scissors. 

Finally, cover the fab- 
ric between the base of 
the tree and the bricks 
with a two - to three-inch 
layer of mulch, such as 
wood chips, stone or bark 
nuggets. Tiie landscape 
fabric will effectively deter 
weeds while allowing 
plenty of air and water to 
the soil, which can then 
reach the tree's roots. 
Also, fabrics help con- 
serve water and keep the 
soil cooler during the hot 
summer months, which 
will further enhance the 
tree's chances for survival. 
Protecting tree roots 

Young trees, especially 
newly-planted ones, can 
benefit from the added 



protection of staking. 
Staking helps trees estab- 
lish strong roots by keep- 
ing them steady, even in 
strong winds, and by po- 
sitioning them to grow 
upright A new product 
called TreeStaKit is a 
complete staking package 
wlilch includes reusable 
stakes, 21 feet of rope and 
a tree strap with eyelets 
that makes anchoring a 
tree up to tiiree inches in 
diameter quick and easy. 
There are a number of 
staJdng methods, so be 
sure to ask the advice of a 
local garden supplier to 
determine the method 
that's best for your tree. 
Whatever method you 
use, most experts recom- 
mend a tree remained 
staked for two years in or- 
der to ensure it is fully an- 
chored. 

Protecting against 
Insects and bark splitting 

Insects, rodents and 
damage from bark split: 
ting are three more com- 
mon causes of young tree 
death. Simply wrapping 
long strips of burlap 
around the base of the 
tree will provide a protec- 
tive barrier. Another op- 
tion is TreeWrap, by Easy 
Gardener. Unlike most 



wraps that break down 
and must be replaced 
every few months, 
TreeWrap is 
weather-resistant and 
lasts at least two years, 
wiiich is the recom- 
mended length of time a 
tree should be wrapped. 

Black on the inside 
and gray on the outside. 
TreeWrap is designed to 
moderate the tempera- 
ture around the tree trunlc, 
thereby reducing the 
likelihood of bark split- 
ting. The material, which 
will stretch as the tree 
grows, also has micro- 
scopic holes that allow 
the beneficial exchange of 
water and air with the 
bark's surface, wtiile 
serving as a physical bar- 
rier to insects and ro- 
dents. Simply wrap it 
around the tree in an 
overlapping spiral. 

These are just a few of 
the great many new irmo- 
vations designed to give 
trees every opportunity to 
grow to their fullest po- 
tential. All of the products 
mentioned in tills article 
are available at lawn and 
garden centers, hardware 
stores and chains nation- 
I wide. 




Mill Creek 
Nursery 




4096O MILL CREEK RIXJ/VADSWORTH, IL 



NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 



SATURDAY & SUNDAY ONLY 

HOURS: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Landscape Architects and Horticulturists On Staff 

..^ HARDY. LOCALLY GROWN 

1^ SHADE TREES "'^ PERENNfALS, GROUNDCOVERS 

^ ORNAMENTALS ' s^ FLATS OF FLOWERS, 



EVERGREENS 



■^ 



POTTED GERANIUMS 



Phone 708-291-9129 

Directions to Mill Creek Nursery: 41 North to Rte. 173 (Rosecrans) 



West to {1st Intersection) Mill Creek Rd., Left on gravel road 1/2 mile to Nursery Sign. 



,1' 






4 



I 




BHgliteu Up 
Foi* Spring! 

We have a large assortment of: 

•Perennials 
•Hanging Baskets 
•Plant Containers 
•Herbs 
•Roses 

Large Selecilan Of 

Bedding Plants 

'S GREENHOUSE 



Rt. 83. (GO) N. of Midlothian, Mundelein 



566-9130 



Hours: Tues.-Sun. 9-5 p.m. 



3> Id^caiAC^^ Reft^tiH^^ 

^kif Ruif - Wk^*t yauGan (lent 

loii II II If :iuit inij II : II 1^11)11 Jii. 11 :iMDii3Ji:i^^^^^^^ 



"Ewe Need It — Rent It From Ram" 




•Trucks & Trailers 
Stump Grinders 
•Shredder For Tree Limbs 
•Chain Saws • 
•Rototillers 
•Trenchers 



•Overseeder 

•Thatchers 

•"Mini" 2 yd. Dump Truck 

•Aerator 

•Backhoe 

•Front-end Loader 



TOOL EQUIPMENT (708) 740-8800 
RENTAL & SALES 1 -(800) 974-8801 




Friday, June 4 J 993 



Lakeland Newspapers 23 



Hi 



fijmir iui . ^ir t'tttZif i& iJlii U JS !S 7'' 






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■ ■-<r/j-V<(;yt..l/;..)..<^:. 



._^. , ■•j^Vaa^. ianvtVA-TT^-JU:.' 



I 



*■■»' 



■h; 







Insect proofing your home the all-natural way 




Think you're too neat, 
too clean or too rich to 
have bugs'? 

Think again. Even Fe- 
lix Unger had them. 

You can lock the doors 



and bar the windows, but 
that won't stop ants, fleas, 
cockroaches, earwigs and 
other crawling trespassers 
from making your home 
their home. According to 
the experts at CherViiree 
Environment Inc., manu- 
facturers of the In- 
sectigone line of all-natu- 
ral insect control prod- 
ucts, the trick to keeping 
these uninvited visitors 
out of the home is to make 
your living quarters as 
inhospitable as possible. 
Start by keeping food 
under wraps, literally. 
Leftovers make tasty 



iate-night snacks for 
hungry family members 
and bugs alike, so make 
sure that food is stored 
properly in tightly -closed 
glass or plastic containers. 
Also, clean up spills and 
crumbs completely, wash 
dishes immediately, and 
take out kitchen trash 
daily, all of which helps 
discourage household 
pests from taking up resi- 
dence. 

Some insects, such as 
cockroaches, are water 
guzzlers, so it's important 
to dry up their water sup - 
ply by repairing leaky 




■ 15% off! 

50 lb. Bag j 
■Black Oil Sunflower Seeds I 



Enjoy Backyard 
Birds! 

NaT4/ is the timo ta 

CLttrctct birafctmilies 

ta yauT yanl. 

Wild Bird Center 

For your enjoyment of backyard birds'^ 

Red Top Plaza 

1322 S. Milwaukee Avenue 

libertyviUe, Illinois 60048 

(Behind Burger King) 




ISi t!^r^ jN>c^^^^^ ^ ^aosj Qpgjj M^nSS^: 10-6; Sunday 12-5 (708) 549-9990 



faucets, pipes and dogged 
drains in the bathroom 
and Icitchen. 

Let's face it, a clean 
home is the best defense 
against bugs, whose feed- 
ing frenzy does consider- 
able damage to uphol- 
stery, curtains and wall- 
paper. Routinely vacuum- 
ing rugs and floors will 
help to minimize infesta- 
tions. In addition, keep- 
ing cracks and crevices In 
baseboards and vents 
dust -free deprives insects 
of a warm, supportive en- 
vironment in which to live 
and reproduce. 
Home Improvement 

Bugs travel vertically 
and horizontally, looking 
for food and nesting ma- 
terials. Besides keeping 
food out of sight and 
emptying the trash regu- 
larly, there are several 
other ways to make your 
home unln\lting to bugs: 

• Remove boxes, clut- 
ter and debris from 
buildings and yards to 
prevent insects from 
nesting. 

• Repair all holes In 



walls, floors and founda 
tions . 

• Seal breaics around 
pipes or wires. 

• Fix damaged screens 
or doors. 

• Keep garbage In 
metal or plastic cans with 
tight lids. 

• Raise wood piles off 
the ground. 

What should you do if 
your house is spotlessly 
clean and 

well-maintained, but 
you're still losing the bat- 
tle of the bugs? One solu- 




tion is to use chemical in- 
secticides. But today's en- 
vironmentally-concerned 
homeowner has a better 
option, a new chemi- 
cal-free powder called In- 
sectigone. There are sev- 
eral versions of the prod- 
uct, designed to attract 
and kill certain insects, 



such as ants, earwigs and 
roaches. Each Insectigone 
powder is composed of 
amorphous dlatomaceous 
earth, or DE, which is 
simply the fossilized 
remains of marine plants 
and algae. This 
finely-ground substance 
looks and feels like tal- 
cum powder to humans, 
but to crawling insects its 
sharp, abrasive texture lit- 
erally scrapes away their 
waxy coating, causing 
them to dehydrate and 
die within 48 hours. 

Recently approved by 
the EPA for indoor and 
outdoor use, all -natural 
Insectigone products are 
packaged in recyclable 
bottles with a pointed 
nose, making it easy to 
disperse or "dust" the 
powder In cracks, crevices, 
kitchen cabinets and 
appliances, near garbage 
cans, around pipes and 
drakis, window frames, 
attics and basements. It 
can also be used quite 
effectively outside, around 
foundations and 
entrances, door frames, as 
well as applied to win- 
dows and patios. 

Remember, the best 
way to keep bugs out is to 
make it hard for them to 
get in. 



Calling All Gardeners 




Hardy 
3 Inch 

MUMS Reg.98c 

Different Colors 
& Varieties 



49 



<t 



GERANIUMS 

70* 

2'/iT0 3 Inch Pots 
4V> In POT $1.50 



AUSTRIAN PINE 
COLORADO SPRUCE 

JlWW 6 FEET 



DENSE 
YEW 

$4yl95 




HANGING BASKEIt? 

BEGONIA / \*\ 



• IMPATIEN5 'PETUNIAS I 

$^98 

10" POT 



6 




14 



Reg. >24.95 
15-18' 



VINCA VINE, 
SPIKES, 
SPRINGER VINE 



CLEMATIS 

$E95 Reg. $7.95 

800 To Choose From 



s 



LARGE SHADE TREES 

Choose From 

•GREEN ASH 

•SILVER MAPLE ^««_, ^ 

•SUGAR MAPLE '^^^ t 

•RED MAPLE ^ ^ 

•NORWAY MAPLE 

•FLOWERING CRAB "^ 2</,to5CAL. 




149 



95 




ANNUALS AND PERENNIALS AVAILABLE 



DECORATIVE PLANTERS 

•AGERATUM 
•GERANIUM 
•IMPATIENS 
•BEGONIAS 
•MARIGOLDS 

JL A Reg. $19.95 

L£^ Delt^ereq & 
■'iftstalkKl 

300YDS.ORMORE 





i 



24 Lakeland Nowspapert 



Friday. Jun© 4, 1993 



■:j ij. -■■•-■;j:*i'' 



----'•"•"rT 



_- 't 




Ballerina summers at Joffrey Ballet 



m H 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



It's a family traditioiL Talent has its rewards. Yvonne will be 

Yvonne Cheng is the fourth daughter In her family to spending the summer in New Yoik City at 
study with Chen lindell at Dancenter North. Her parents the legendary Joffirey Ballet 

An eighth-grader at Highland School, 
Yvoime has been a student at Dancenter 
North since she was four. She has danced 
the leading role of Dara in "The Magic of 
the Nutcracker" for the past two years. 



bySUZIEREED 



"She's an exceptional student," said 
Lindell. "She gets straight A's. She plays 
the violin. She's a very personable young 
lady." 

According to Lindell, Yvoime. went to 
two auditions and was offered scholar- 
ships at both the Boston Ballet and 
Joffrey. She will attend classes in the 
trainee program at tiie Jfoffrey scliool and, 
if she's good enough, she wlU be selected 
to participate In a performance there on 
August?. 

This is the first year Yvoime has audi- 
tioned for a summer dancing program. 

"It's the first year I wanted to spend 
the summer dancing rather than being 
with my friends." she said. "It's something 
I really want to do." 

Yvonne will be rooming at Joffrey in a 
dorm with another Dancenter student, 
Suzarmah LeMarquand of Lalce Forest. 

She has never been away from home 
for that length of time before but an older 
sister has been to classes at the Boston 
Ballet 

When aslced about her love of ballet, 
Yvonne admitted she first began dancing 
because of her older sisters but found out 



she liked it as welL 

I like the music and the movements, 

the way things go together. It's really 

beautiful." 

Yvonne plays the piano as well as the 

violin, and wiiile she likes classical music 

as one would expect, she says, "I listen to 

all different kinds of music It depends on 

my mood.** 

Although ballet is a big part of her life 
right now, Yvonne says of the future, "I 
think ril wait and see how it goes," 

Several students at Dancenter North 
have been selected for special programs 
this smnmer. 

'It's the first year I wanted to 
spend the summer dancing 
rather than being with my 
friends. It's something I really 
want to do* 

—Yvonne Cheng 

Amy Brandt, a Junior at Carmel High 
School, has received a scholarship to the 
Milwaukee Ballet The session lasts from 
June to August. Amy is the daughter of 
Robert and Patricia Brandt of libertyvUle. 

Krista Hendrickson and Jennifer Bull 
have been accepted at the Virginia School 
of the Arts for a six-week course. Both girls 
are 13 years old; Krista Is a student at 
Highland School and Jennifer goes to 
Hawthorn School. 

Cheri Lindell began Dancenter North 
19 years ago. She now has a staff of 12 
teachers. 





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Friday, June 4, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 25 









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Fare 

Mad Hatter hosts tea party 

The Mad Hatter is inviting guest to tea at the Cuneo Museum and Gardens in Vemon 
Hills, Sat. June 12 from 2 to 4 p.m. A light refreshment of cookies and punch will be 
served in the gardens at 2 p.m. (Please bring a blanket to sit on). Admission is $8 for chil- 
dren and $2 for adults. Children must be accompanied by an adult 

Alice, the Queen and the March Hare will host a game of croquet orchestrated by the 
Chicago Moving Company from 3 to 4 p.m. 

Reservations are limited. Please call the museum at 362-3042 and ask for tea party 
reservations. 

Tom Chapin to appear in Woodstock 

Tom Chapin will appear in two concerts at the Woodstock Opera House on Sat. June 
19. Chapin will perform his critically acclaimed children's show at 2 p.m. and present a 
concert for ail ages at 8 p.m. 

The secret of Tom's success lies in that intangible element which combines earthiness, 
genuine concem and a personal warmth that makes everyone feel like a treasured friend. 
This shines through in all of Tom's concerts from a coffeehouse to a major festival. 

Seats are available for the children's show at $9 each Seats for the evening concert are 
$1 1. Tickets are on sale at die Woodstock Opera House. For more information call (815) 
338-5300. 

Chicago Children's Museum extends hours for summer 

The Chicago Children's Museum has extended its hours ?jt the summer and will be 
offering drop-in take-home arts activities all day long from June 7 through Sept. 3. 

lune special programs include: "Memories from Puerto Rico." Learn about Chicago's 
Puerto Rican community and the tropical fruits and music of this beautiful island on Sat. 
June 5 from noon to V p.m. 

Summer hours are in effect June 7 through Sept. 3. Hours are Monday- Sunday, 10 am. 
to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday free family night, 5 to 8 p.m. Admission is $2.50 for children and 
$3.50 for adults. The Chicago Children's Museum is located at 465 E. Illinois Street 
(North Pier) , in Chicago. 

Sealed with a kiss 

Through Aug. 29, Chicago Cliildren's Museum will present its newest exhibit, Sealed 
with a Kiss: Mail Art, sponsored by the United Parcel Service Foundation. 




S.W.A.K.: Mail Art is a highly interactive exhibit of fanciful art that redefines the every- 
day act of mailing a bill or sending a letter to a friend. Mall Art is art that has been post- 
marked; it is correspondence designed to please the eye as well as the rnlhd. Tliere are 
thousands of artists worldwide who create art out of and on spaces as little ds'ahiiieteen 
cent postcards or a letter size envelope— and then send It to someone through the mail. 

Design stations in the exhibit will offer paper, paint, rubber stamp images, markers, 
copy machine art and found objects to all who wish to try their hand at creating their own 
masterpiece to mail to a special pen pal. In addition, young artist will bie able to com- 
memorate important individuals or events in their own lives by designing and then mak- 
ing their own stamps. Also on display in this section vyill be winning entries from the 
Illinois Department of Conservation's Junior Duck Stamp Contest. 

Cliicago Children's Museum is dedicated to the needs and interest of children and their 
families. Located at 465 E. Illinois Street n North Pier Chicago, 2nd Floor. For more infor- 
mation, call (312) 527-1000.— by RHONDA VINZANT 



I) the night . . . 



Mundelein native Jcannle Tanner will sing the national antliem at Comiskey Park, 
Saturday, June 5, when tlie White Sox host tlie Boston RcdSox. Tanner just released 
"Anytime/Anywhere" on JNM Records. 

Friday 

Michael Coleman and the Backbrcakers will sing tlic blues at Slice of Chicago, 36 
S. Nortliwest Hwy., Palatine, 991-2150 . . . Rhoads & Craven will rock Shades, 21860 
N. Milwaukee Ave.. Dccrfield, 634 -BLUE. Opening band is SmaU Town . . . White 
Saddle wnll perform at a Nuts and Bolts Party at Sundance Saloon, Routes 176 and 83, 
Mundelein, 949-0858 . . . Whiskey Bent is at The Southern Star, Route 134, Round 
Lake, 740-8448. 

Saturday 

It's an R & B bash at Shades with Rod Piazza, Chicago R & B, and Kings with Daddy 
G . . . Fabulous Flshhcads at Slice of Chicago . . . White Saddle at Sundance Saloon . 
.. Whiskey Bent at tlie Southern Star. 

Sunday 

Catch tlie open jam session led by Ernie Garner at Fringe Benefits, Grass Lake Road 
and Drexell, Antioch. Itstarts at 5 p.m. Call 395-2777.— by ClAUDIAM. LENART 

To have your band, singer, or musical entertainment listed in the Into the Night 
column send all information to Claudia M. Lenart, do Lakeland Newspapers, 30 S. 
Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 or call 223-8161. 




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26 Lakakind N»wtpap«rt 



Friday,Jun©4.1993 






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Folk concert 

Kat Eggleston and Andrew Calhoun, 

a popular folk duo, will perform on 

Friday; June 4 at 8 p.m. at the David 

I Adlcr Cultural Center Ballroom, 1700 

iN. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyvitle. 

{Appearing with them will be Pat 

Gaughn, an instructor at the Cultural 

Center. Admission is $B for adults, $5 

for seniors, children and Cultural 

Center Members. For further details 

call 367-0707. ' 

Open stage nights 

The David Adler Cultural Center hosts Open 
Stage Nights every Friday in June beginning 
June 11, from 8 p.m. to midnight. Musicians of 
all levels are encouraged to share their music. 
There is no admission fee, but contributions 
are welcome. For further information call 367- 
0707. 

Jazz in June 

Ravinia Festival presents the third season of 



Leisure 



Jazz in June, which will run from June 1 1 to 20, 
featuring such jazz luminaries as Oscar 
Peterson, Mel Torme and the Wynton Marsalis 
Septet For further information call (312)R-A-V- 
I-N-l-A (728-4642). 

I Sculpted Concepts 
Sculpted Concepts, featuring works 
by Carole Komarek and Ruth Ann 
Frazier, will be exhibited now dirough 
July 2 at the Community Gallery of Art, 
located in the west wing of the main 
building of the College of Lake County. 
Gallery hours are: Through June 4, 
Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m.; June 7 through July 2, Monday 
throu^ Thursday 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. and 
Fridays a.m. to .4:30 p.m. For further 
information call 223-6601, ext.2240. 

Watercolor exhibit 

Works by the Lakes Region Watercolor Guild 
will be presented June 19 through July 22 at the 
David Adler Cultural Center, 1700 N. 



Milwaukee Ave,, Libertyvllle. The public is 
invited to attend the opening reception in 
honor of the participadng artists on Saturday, 
June 19 from 5 to 7 p.m. The exhibit can be 
viewed Mondays through Saturdays. Call the 
Adler Center at 367-0707 for gallery hours and 
further Information. 

Buoys and belles 

The Buoys and Belles Square Dance 
Club is hosting a "Sing and Dance" 
dance on Friday, June 4 from 8:30 to 11 
p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 
128 N. Utica St., Waukegan. There will 
be a Round Dance Workshop from 8 to 
8:30 p.m. and a Plus Tip at 11 p.m. For 
more information call 662-6.'>46. 

Dancenter North 

Dancenter North of Libertyvllle will 
I have an expanded summer session 
with many specialty programs to be held from 
June 14 to July 31. Offered are.Summer Dance 
Camp, Musical Theatre Workshop, 
Cheerleading and Pom-Pen Workshop and 
"Boys Only" classes. Registrations are being 
accepted through June 12. For further informa- 
tion and schedules call 367-7970. 

Barn dance 

The David Adler Cultural Center holds 
Community Barn Dances every month which 
include a variety of traditional American 
dances. Live music and experienced callers are 




provided to lead the dancers through the fig- 
ures. Beginners are welcome. The next barn 
dance wll be held Saturday, June Sat 8 p.m.'at^ 
the American Legion Hall, 715 N. Milwaukee 
Ave,, Libertyvllle. Admission is $5 for adults, $4 
for seniors, children and Cultural Center mem- 
bers, and free for children under 8 years old. 

Combined club dance 

All singles are invited to the Combined Club 
Singles Dance at B p.m. on Saturday, June 19 at 
the Wyndham Hamilton Hotel, 400.Park Blvd., 
Itasca. Music will be provided by Music in 
Motion. The event Is co-sponsored by the 
Northwest Singles Assn., Young Suburban 
Singles and Singles & Company. Admission is 
$5. For more information call 209-2066, 

'The Swan' 

"The Swan" will play at Apple Tree 
iTheatre through Sunday, June 13. "The 
ISwan" is a modern fantasy about a 
hovelorn nurse whose life Is trans- 
{formed when she takes in a mysteri- 
lous, wounded swan.Showtimes are 
7:30 p.m. Wednesdays, 8 p.m. Fridays, 
15:30 and 9 p.m. Saturdays, and 3 and 7 
[p.m. Sundays. Ticket prices range from 
|S20 to $23. For reservations or infer- 
Imation, call Apple Tree Theatre at 432- 
'4335, or vw^ite Apple Tree Theatre, 595 
Elm Place, Highland Park, 111. 60035. 
(Continued on page 28) 




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The Grand Ole Opry 
A Childhood Dream 



by JIM WARNKEN, PRESIDENT 
NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

As a child in the 50's, my first "build il yourself 
project was a crystal radio. Laic on Saturday nights, 
long after I was supposed to be sleeping, I would tunc 
in WLS on that radio and listen to the Grand OIc Opry. 
(That was when WLS was known as the "Bam Dance 
Station.") I would dream of being at the Opry and 
seeing, in. person, the Stars of Country whose voices I 
faindy heard llirough llic earphone of my home built 
radio. Last Saturday that dream came true. 

After closing the agency, I caught an afternoon Hight 
to Nashville. My flight got in about 5 p.m. That gave 
me just enough tiinc to check in to my hotel and head 
up to the Opry to catchthc 6:30 p.m. show. 

Scats arc assigned by the date of request, cither by 
phone of mail. I request mine about a month in advance 
and was lucky enough to gel front row in die first 
balcony. Tickets cost from '11 lo *15 and can be 
ordered by calling 615-889-3060. They will be held for 
you at the box office. 

Many of the voices I heard on my crystal set in the 
fifties came to life for me ilial Saturday. The 2-1/2 hour 
show included Jim Ed Brown, Skcclcr Davis, Porter 
Wagoner, Jeanne Pructt, Ray Pillow, Jcn7 Ciowcr, 
Stonewall Jackson, Tlic Carlisles, Hank Snow and even 
BroUicr Oswald, just to name a few of the oJd-limers. 
Newer taleni included tlic likes of Emmylou Harris and 
a group called the 4 Guys. 

Tlie next day I drove into town and saw the Ryman 
Auditorium, tlic original home of ilic Opry. 1 got lo the 
Country Music Hall of Fame too late, so I'll save that 
for another trip. I did drive out of town to "gawk" at Uic 
homes of die stars. Miitnic Pearl's got a fabulous estate 
right next door lo the Governor. Tammy Wynetlc's 
place was really somelliing, loo. I couldn't get a good 
view of Johnny Cash's house on Uie river. Little Jimmy 
Dickens' one slory ranch was a bit modest. 

I stayed al a newer hotel called tlie Club House Inn, 
The location was great since it's right near Uic airport 
and just soutli of tlie Opry. They have great weekend 
rale which includes a free full buffet breakfast. 



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11 

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Friday, June 4, 1W3 



Lakeland Newspapers 27 



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Dining and Entertaininent 



Lakelife 



Lakeland 



(Continued from page 27) 

Ice Cream Suit* 

Bowen Park Theatre Company at the Jack 
Benny Center for the Arts, 39 Jack Benny Dr., 
Waukegan, presents Ray Bradbury's "The 
Wonderful Ice Cream Suit," directed by Mark 
Heller, and the Ballet Folklorico "San Jose." The 
Mexican-American Festival opens Thursday, 
June 3 for a three-week limited engagement 
tlirough June 19. Taco Loco restaurant will sell 
Mexican food one hour before each perfor- 
mance. Show times are 8 p.m. Thursdays 
through Saturdays; 3 p.m. Sunday, June 13. 
Tickets are $12, $10 for students and seniors. 
For reservations and information call 360-4741. 

'Driving Miss Daisy' 

"Driving Miss Daisy" will be presented now 
through June 27 at Shady Lane Dinner Theatre 
in Marengo. Performances run Thursday 
through Sunday at 8 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 
at 2 p.m. Tickets are SIO to $15. Further infor- 
mation and reservations for dinner theatre 
packages and individual ticket sales may be 
obtained by calling the Rock Valley College box 
office at 654-4296 or the Shady Lane box office 
at 568-3270. 

'Let's Get A Divorce' 

PM&L Theatre presents "Let's Get A 
Divorce," by Victorien Sardou and Emile de 
Najac. This farce, set in 1880 France, will open 
at PM&L Theater, Main Street, Antioch, June 4 



with performances set for June 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 
18, 19, and 20. Perforniances arc at 8 p.m. 
except the June 6, 13, and 20 Sunday matinees 
starting at 2:30 p.m. Tickets arc $8, widi student 
and senior citizens tickets priced at $6. For 
reservations call 395-3055. 

Bowen Park auditions 

Bowen Park Theatre Company at the Jack 
Benny Center for the Arts, 39 Jack Benny Dr., 
Waukegan will audition for the Summer Shows 
for Young Audiences on Sunday, June 13 at 6 
p.m. Actors and actresses 20 years and up to be 
cast for"Rumpelstiltskin," "The Point," and 
"Hansel and Gretel." The series will run 
tlirough July and August For more information 
call 360-4741. 

PM&L auditions 

Auditions for PM&L Theatre's "Camelot" will 
be held on Tuesday and Wednesday, June 8 
and 9 at 7:30 p.m. at Antioch High School, cor- 
ner of Rtes. 83 and 173, Men and women, ages 
20 to 60s, and one boy age 12 to 16 are needed. 
For more information call Deane Jones at 546- 
1889. 

Opera auditions 

The Bowen Park Opera Company of 
Waukegan will be holding auditions for the part 
of Cio Cio San in Puccini's "Madame Butterfly" 
on June 19 beginning at 2 p.m. Auditions are by 
appointment only. Call 360-4741 to schedule 
an audition time. 



ial Events 




Qi< 


C/D 



'Magic of Spring' 

Allendale will host its annual "Magic of Spring" dinner dance on Saturday, June 5 at 6 p.m. 
at Glen View Club in Golf. The event includes live and silent auctions and a showing of 
Allendale's award-winning video. Tliis benefit raises funds for Allendale, a treatment center 
for emotionally disturbed children. For further information call 356-2351, ext. 201. 

Walking tour of Ravinia 

The Highland Park Historic Preservation Commission is sponsoring a "Behind the Scenes" 
walking tour of tlie Ravinia Festival Park on Saturday, June 5. The tour will highlight the his- 
tory, architecture, landscape and artwork contained within the grounds. Tours will depart 
from in front oflhe box office/main gate at 11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m. Cost is $4 for adults and 
$2 for students. For further details call 432-0867. 

Arts and crafts market 

The Lake Zurich Lions Club is sponsoring the Nineteenth Annual Arts and Crafts Market on 
Sunday, June 6 from 10 a.m. until dark at Lion Fred Blau Park on Main St. in Lake Zurich. For further 
information call 566-1465 or 540-8182. 

Bocce exliibition 

Molinari Sambuca lixtra and Tlie United States Bocce Federation are hosting a bocce exhibition 
on Monday, June 7 at noon at Chicago's Daley Plaza to introduce the traditional Italian sport to 
Americans. Bocce's finest players will be on hand to demonstrate the game, provide instruction and 
answer questions. In addition, the United States Bocce Championships will be held June 12 to 19 at 
the Alpine Country Club in Round Lake. 

Collector car auction 

The 21st Annual Greater Chicago Collector Car Auction will be held Friday, Saturday and 
Sunday, June 11 to 13 in Volo on Rte. 120, one half-mile west of Rtc. 12. Auction auto previewing will 
be Friday from noon to 5 p.m. with the auction beginning at 6 p.m. Saturday hours are 10 a.m. to 6 
p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. General admission is $8 for adults and $3 for children up to 12 
years of age. For further information call (815)305-8408 or (815)344-6062. 



Salmon classic , 

Waukegan Port District is sponsoring a Salmon Classic Jackpot on Saturday, June 12. 
Participants could win $10,000. Pre-rcgistration is required. For further details call 595-9596. 

Mad Hatter Tea 

There will be a Mad Hailei Tea at the Cuneo Museum and Gardens In Veraon Hills on Saturday, 
June 12 from 2 to 4 p.m. (Bring a blanket to sit on). Hat-making kits will be provided, and a game of 
croquet, orchestrated by The Chicago Moving Company, will take place from 3 to 4 p.m. Admission 
is $8 for children, $2 for adults. (children must be accompanied by an adult). Entrance to the muse- 
um will not be covered in the admission for this program. Reservations are necessary and can be 
made by calling 362-3042 

'Run for the Roses' 

OMNI Youth Services will host their annual spring gala, "Run for the Roses," sponsored by 
American Airlines, Saturday, June 12 at noon in the International Room of Arlington International 
Racecourse. Featured will be a silent auction, a] I -you -can -eat buffet and $2,000 in cash prizes to be 
raffled away. Tickets are a $50 donation per person. All proceeds benefit OMNI Youth Services. For 
more information or to make a reservation call 537-7357. 

Now appearing at Zanies 

Appearing at Zanies Comedy Nite Club, 230 Hawthorn Village Commons, Vernon Hills, will be 
Robert Jetter, Tim Slagle and Paul Digulio through June 6; and Skip Griparis and Mfchael Alexander 
June 8 through 13. For further details or reservations call 549-6030. 

Midnight Tour 

Join thousands of motorcycle riders In the 14th Annual Midnight Tour on Saturday, June 12. 
Meet at 10 p.m. at Maryville Academy, Central and River Rds., Dcs Plaines. Gates will open at 5 p.m. 
for the 65 mile, escorted tour. Vendors, entertainment, food and beverages, guest personalities, 
motorcycle services and accessories will be available. Cost is $5 per person. No pro-registration Is 
required. For more information call 635-6724. 

Free VW and Audi inspection service 

Lake County Automotive, 45 W. Belvidere Rd„ Hainesvillc vrill be offering a free bumper to 
bumper diagnosis of VW and Audi cars during the month of June. This offer is open to everyone. An 
estimate of the repairs needed will be provided free of charge, along with a 10 percent off labor dis- 
count coupon applicable at Lake County Automotive for all repairs diagnosed. Call 223-9684for an 
appointment. . 



Central Baptist 

On July 30, Central 
Baptist Children's Home, 
215 N. Milwaukee Ave., 
Lake Villa, will sponsor 
the "ChUdren First" Golf 
Invitational at Midlane 
Country Club, 14565 
Yorkhouse Rd., Wads- 
worth, beginning at noon 
shot-gun start. The day of 
golf for $125 includes: 
Midlane Express lunch, 



home plans golf 

green fee and cart, 18 hole 
best ball scramble, locker 
room and towel, driving 
range warm-up, 5:30 p.m. 
refreshments arid hors 

d'oeuvres and 6:30 p.m. 
dinner followed by 
magician/entertainer Will 
Tremont. Tickets for the 
dinner are available for 
$50. Call 356-2391 for 



invitational 

further information. 

There will be a silent ' 
auction and two of the 
special donations include 
two free tickets to see a 
1993-94 Bull's home ex- 
hibitian game and a 
baseball from the Chicago 
Cubs, which as the origi- 
nal signature autographed 
by Shawon Dunston. 



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Cliampagiic Tonal 

Honi D'Oeuvrca 

Wedding Cake 

4 Hour Open Bar 

Choice of Entree or BufTcl 

$27 Per Person Phis Tax 



S^ 



200 N. Grecnbay Rd., Wniik«:(jan 
Between WmhinKton & Grand • 70»/244-2i00 ^ 



Hand 
SVs Clean & Polish 



ROYEK'S 



.:)Cv BLACK 
» BEAR 



CHALET 

Restaurant and Lounge 

69 S. Washington Street 
Ingleside, Illinois 60041 

Bemeen RolUns Rd, & Grand Ave. -Fox Lake 
(708) 587-7933 



ZZ7/Z7 CZ\\ Starting June 5. 1 993 

Saturdays & Sundays 
8:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. 

* Includes free demonstr'ation of.our unique 
Wax-N-Go Guaranteed Showroom Shine. - 
Oversize vehicles slightly higher. 



(708)" 
249-8000 . 
For Appl. 



550 North 
Green Buy 
Wuukegun 



Behind Hansen Pool & Spa Bldg. 




EUsdbeth & Willy Royek are Back!!! 
They'll be serving you once agabit 
their fine German/American cuisine. 
Please stop by and say "Hi" to some 
of your old friends. 

Well be looking forward to greeting 
our old friends and making some 
new ones. 

Reservations are appreciated. 

Please catt 587-7933 



28 Lakefond Newspapers 

V -If. s q n q M /' il I b n 'jci a J 



Frlday,JunG/J, 1993 

cx< r III I i, . 'tiJitH 



Dining and Entertainment 





Lakeland 



iiRoinantic tale rooted 
at Apple Tree Theatre 

Feathers are flying at Apple Tree Theatre in Highland Park, where "The 
Swan," a comic fable written by Elizabeth Egloff and dbrected by Mark T Lococo, 
is playing through June 13. 

If s a romantic tale rooted In mythology about a thrice-divorced nurse, Dora, 
who discovers true love when she takes in a swan that crash landed on the win- 
dow of her living 



of 



room 

Bill, a kind 
man/bird, is an 
unusual creature. At 
first he brings in rab- 
bits and mice he has 
snared as food; later, he takes 
to wearing clothes— suits, ties 
and suchr— and mimicking the 
words and actions of those 
around hinL 

Among those Bill must 
deal with is Kevin, an unhap- 
pily married miJicman who is 
involved with Dora in a unsat- 
isfying relationship. Kevin 
(played by James Sudik) 
quickly recognizes what a 
serious adversary a swan can 
be! 

Kate Buddeke, as Dora, 
finds her life just isn't the 
same now that Bill (Kevin 
Gudahl, in a remarkable inter- 
pretation) has come on the 
scene. 

Monika Essen, scenic 
designer, deserves special 
mention for her kitschy set. 

Ticket Information is avail- 
able at 432-4335.— by TOM 





WITOM 



Kate Buddeke and Kevin Gudahl In "The Swan' 



Join women's fitness camp 



Join a dynamic group 
of women and explore a 
holistic approach to well- 
ness. Women's Fitness 
Camp offers: a supervised 
nutritional low-fat food 
program, exercise classes 
and healthy life style sem- 
inars. 

YMCA Camp Duncan 
is a beautiful and peaceful 
resident camp located in 
Ingleside. Camp Duncan 
possesses a quiet natural 
beauty that includes large, 
old oak trees and a private 
lake. Duncan's well 
maintained facilities in- 
cludes a dining hall with 
knotty pine walls that 
house two stone fire- 
places, rustic cabins, 



modern centrally located 
washrooms, a well 
equipped lake front, 
Olympic indoor swim- 
ming pool and 400 acres 
of natural beauty. 



activities, according to 
Cass Hale, Women's 
Fitness Camp Director. 
"There are some who 
come to paint, read or 
some — just relax. 



Camp organizers say a Participants have the 
typical day begins with an choice of participating or 
early morning hike and not. This is a week to relax 



wake -up stretches, fol- 
lowed by breakfast, a step 
aerobics class, aerobics, 
lunch, swimming, 

boating and canoeing, 
healthy 
seminars, 



and unwind. Participants 
may want to pamper 
themselves to a massage, 
haircut and/or mani- 
cure — all available on site 

life style for an additional charge. 

volleyball. 



dinner, hikes and an Come see the differ- 

evening program and re- ence that a well planned 



laxation exercises before 
bed. 

Not all campers 
participate In the exercise 



Golf outing for youth set 

Ron Rivera and Jim fee is available for those 

Morrissey of the Chicago that can golf but not stay 

Bears will host the Sev- for dinner. The din- 

enth Annual Golf Outing ner-only fee is $25. Call 

for the Lake County Forest 526-0238 for reservations. 



program ol exercise, 
healthy food, relaxation, 
and health related activi- 
ties can make." 

Make new friends, 
enjoy Camp Duncan's 
natural surroundings and 
have lots of fun. For more 
information: Call YMCA 
Camp Duncan 546-8086. 



— : PSYCHIC 



Preserves' Youth Conser- 
vation Corps on Wednes- 
day, June 9 at Brae Loch 
Golf Course In Grayslakc. 

Festivities begin with a 
10 a.m. lunch followed by 



Proceeds will benefit a 
summer conservation job 
program for Lake County 
youths between the ages 
of 16 and 18. Since 1974, 
the program has em- 



FAIR 



an 11:30 a.m. shotgun ployed hundreds of 



start. Cocktails, dinner 
and prize distribution fol- 
low at Brae Loch's ban- 
quet hall. The $85 fee in- 
cludes the golfing, a cart, 
lunch and dinner. A $60 



teenagers in the Lake 
County Forest Preserves. 
All salaries are paid 
through donations from 
businesses and individu- 
als. 



Ravinia coupons books on sale 



Ravlnla Festival pa- 
trons can save 20 percent 
on reserved seats, lawn 
admission, and parking 
throughout the festival's 
summer season by pur- 
chasing discount coupon 
books now being sold 
through July 11. 

Each book contains 25 



coupons worth $1 each 
and costs $20. Coupons 
will be accepted at any 
entrance gate for lawn 
admission, or redeemed 
at the box office for re- 
served seat tickets. To 
purchase a coupon book 

call (312)RAVINIA. 



June 5 & 6, Sat. & Sun. 
TAMARA ROYALE 

4100 Shamrock (Rl. 31), McHenry 

LedureS'Pnvala Coradtitions/Matlena't 
New Aga SUnes & CtysUis • 1 0-7 Daijr 

2Sof 

America'tBetf 

Klh 

mam 
mm 

MOOSE 

Marlena roads your oWmrlPPn 

luture In Iho rocks. BliUKXiWE 

Hear hor Thursdays, i„ovi/rT 

12:1 5-1:00 WLIP radio. UAWlUti 
1050 AM 

COMING! JUNE 12 & 13 

LaQuinla, Rt. 72, Hoffman Esies. 

PSYCHIC HOT LINE 




708-885-1177 



LL6/3 



'1"OFFlCbnsuItationw/ad. 



'The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit' 

Rob Hadding of Waukegan, Tonn Colvin of ZIon and Fred Schenck of 
Waukegan come to blows over 'The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit" by Ray 
Bradbury plo^dng Thursdays and weekends through June 19 at 8 p.m. and 3 
p.m. June 13 at the Bowen Park Theatre, 39 Jack Benny Dr., Waukegan. Call 
3604741 for reservations.— Photo courtesy of Forrest Muschewske. 



Lamb's fund raiser set for June 4 



The Lambs 1993 Good 
Shepherd Award Dinner 
will be held Friday, 
June 4, under a spectacu- 
lar tent on the grounds of 
Lambs Farm in 
Libertyville. This fund 
raising benefit is held ev- 
ery several years to cele- 
brate the achievements of 
The Lambs and to honor 
the special individuals 
who have helped The 
Lambs attain those 
achievements. Good 
Shepherds (primary 
honorees) this year are 
Dollle and Jack Gaiter of 
Chicago. Additional hon- 
orees are Aldrldge Elec- 
tric, Inc. and The Helen V. 
Brach Foundation. 

Co-chalrs of the 1993 
Good Shepherd Award 
Dinner are Women's 
Board President Karen 
Lieberman and Board of 
Directors Member 
Thomas McNally.. 



This elegant evening 
includes a lavish hors 
d'oeuvres and cocktail 
hour followed by a 
gourmet dinner that is 
prepared and served by 
Lambs staff, participants 
and volunteers. Dick Jud- 
son and his Orchestra will 
provide musical enter- 
tainment. 

Individual tickets to 
this black-tie optional 
event are $200, or 52,000 
for a table of ten. All pro- 
ceeds will be directed to- 
ward The Lambs Geriatric 
and Retirement Facility 
which will ensure the fu- 
ture security of The 
Lambs' men and women. 
(All donations are tax-de- 
ductible to the extent pro- 
vided by law.) 

For more information 
about The Good Shep- 
herd Award Dinner, 
please contact Lambs De- 
velopment Dept., (708) 



362 4636. 

Lambs Farm, which 
provides vocational, resi- 
dential and social support 
services to 190 mentally 
handicapped adults, is lo- 
cated at Route 176 
(Rockland Rd.) and 1-94, 
Libertyville. 

YMCA day camp 

Hastings Lake YMCA is 
taking applications for 
Summer Day Camp. 
Children ages 6 through 
12 can enjoy all the ad- 
ventures of summer camp. 
Boating, archery, swim- 
ming, horseback riding, 
and sports cire just some 
of the camp activities. 
Camp offers five two-week 
sessions beginning June 
14 and run through Aug. 
20. Camp hours are 9 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. With extended 
care available form 7 a.m. 
to 6 p.m. Call 356-4000 for 
further information. 



\W PRCMICnn EVENT! LIVE M mVPER-VIEW! 



FINALIST 



SUP£ltSEED#S 



WINNER 



SUPER SEED #4 



' AUNEW ' 

smummimoN 



o: 



KING ^-^ RING ;^: 




jijmstEo#j]| 



WINNER 



SUPEIlSlED#i 



flHALIST 



m^m #7 1 | 



WINKER 






SUPER SEED #1 



' WHDWIllBEKING?-^ 
BEAPARTOFTHECOROniAnON! 

ALSO FEAniRING: \^ CHAMPIONSHIP MATCH 
CHAMPION HUlK HOGAN'" VS YOHOZUNA"- , 
plus MORE EXCITING ACnONl i 




KTOfUD WRESrUHC FEDCflATIOII* 



SUNDAY, JUNE 13 •7:00 P.M., REPLAY: 10:00 P.M. 



q, CAL L YOUR LOCAL CABLE COMPANY TO ORDER! 
% TCI of Illinois. Inc. 

We're lak'm^ (clevtsion into tomoimw. 

In Serviceable Areas 
Call (n 15) 34 4 -3 150 or 1 (000)225-2415 



r»mi>i»:'(>"Bi>fi«!>irfi">'«i '<*• r»»>^,fHi imHniCttdimwt.nrwciBLMinioviBut BUHcnnroiatcD wimmiutitu niimsionCiH 



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Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



Lakeland Nowipapers 29 












I -Ml 
l-tt 




There 



FRIDAY 



[Parent group 



The Parent Group, Inc. sponsors weekly Parents 
lAnonymous self-help support groups at no charge. 
1 Parents attend these groups out of their desire to be bet- 
ter parents. No cost structured child care is available dur- 
ing all meetings. The support groups meet in Waukcgan 
on Friday mornings from 9 to 11 a.m., Thursday evenings 
in Vernon Hills from 7 to 9 p.rh. and in Zion on Tuesday 
evenings from 8 to 9 p.m. and Wednesday afternoons 
from 3 to 4:30 p.m. For further information call 263-7272. 



SATURDAY 



Northlake Singles 

The Northlake Singles Club is sponsoring a dinner and movie 
on Saturday, June 5. Dinner will be at El Barrio's in Mundeleln 
and the movie to follow will be the Rocky Horror Picture Show at 
Mundelein Cinema. Time to meet will be 7:30 p.m. Call the 
Hotline for more details, 265-1387. 



SUNDAY 



Drive-in reunion car sliow, swap 

On Sunday, June 6, the Eleventh Annual Skip's Fiesta Drlve-In 
Reunion Car Show and Swap meets at the Lake County 
Fairgrounds from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Billed as "Chicago's Largest 
Summer Event," admission is $5.50 and parking is free. For fur- 
ther information call 682-8792 or write Skip's, P.O. Box 80266, 
Carol Stream, 111. 60188. 



TUliSDAY 



tlie Uptovim Ballroom, 62118 22nd Ave., Kenosha, Wis. from 8 to 
11 p.m. for dancing and socialization. For more information call 
Buzz at (414)652-1677. 



WEDNESDAY 



SOLO dance 

SOLO Singles Club will meet Wednesday, June 9 at the Princess 
RRStaurant, 1290 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyvillc, from 8 p.m. to 
midnight. For more information call 816-1011 or 249-5067. 

Alzheimer's support groups 

The Chicago Area Chapter of the Alzheimer's Assn. sponsors 
Alzheimer's support groups in Long Grove the second Wednesday 
of each month from 1 to 3 p.m. and the third Wednesday of each 
month from 7 to 9 p.m. at Maple Hill Nursing Center, Box 2308, 
R.F.D. The next meeting will be held Wednesday, June 9. These 
informal sessions are free and open to the public. For more infor- 
mation call 933-1000. 



-THURSDAY 



La Leche League 

La Leche League of Chaln-O-Lakes will meet on-Wednesday, 
June 16 at 9:30 a.m. at the home of Terry Grom. For more infor- 
mation and location of the meeting call Grom at 587-2957 or 
Sharon Mullaney at 688-0424. 

Blue Lite Singles 

The Blue Lite Singles Club, for ages 50 and up, meets the first 
and third Thursday of every month will get-togethers planned 
throughout the month. Their next meeting will be held Thursday, 
June 17. For more Information call 623-1147 or 872-1065. 



Exchange Club 



The Exchange Club of Grayslake meets every Thursday at 
noon at Randell's Restaurant in Grayslake. Visitors and prospec- 
tive members are invited to join the club for lunch and learn more 
about the Exchange. For more information and reservations con- 
tact Bob Wegge at 223-0777, Mohika O'Connor at 223-5547, or 
JoAnn Rttzwoller at 223-8161. 



Adult volleyball 



Recreational volleyball for single young adults ages 21 to 38 will 
be sponsored by the Catholic Alumni Club from 6:30 p.m. until 
sunset on Thursdays from now through September at Willow 
Stream Park, Old Checker Rd,, two blocks west of Buffalo Grove 
Rd. in Buffalo Grove. There is no charge for playing. For more 
information call (312)726-0735. 



COMING SOON 



Genealogical society 



Singles' activities 



The Lake County Genealogical Society will meet on Tuesday, 
June 8 at Cook Memorial Library, 413 N. Milwaukee Ave.. 
Libertyvillc at 7:30 p.m. Lester Hartrick will speak on German- 
Irish-American Connection: Sources. For further details caJl Joan 
at 566-1789 or Wanda at 546-4154. 

Young Single Parents 

For parents who are single, divorced or widowed, between the 
ages of 21 to 60, join Young Single Parents Club every Tuesday at 



The Northlake Singles Club invites all single adults age 21 and 
over to their dance on Friday, June 1 1 at 8:30 p.m. at the Antioch 
Golf Club banquet room. They are also sponsoring a day at the 
Milwaukee Zoo on Sunday, June 13. Place and time to meet will 
be at 10:30 a.m. at the Holiday Inn in Gurnec. Sign up early. A 
night of country dance lessons will be hosted by the Northlake 
Singles Club on Tuesday, June 15 at the Southern Star In Round 
Lake at 7 p.m. For further details on all events, call the Hotline at 
265-1387. 




^el World 



'Yonkers* great film find 

"Everybody's loss is someone else's' gain," is a bit of 
philosophy that came to mind while watching Neil 
Simon's Pulitzer Prize play open on the movie screen. 

"Lost in Yonkcrs," walked away with a lot of Tonys for 
its stage version and now Mercedes Ruehl, Irene Worth 
and Richard Dreyfus threaten to do much of the same at 
the next Academy Av/ards. 

Director Elmer Bernstein treats Simon's salute to the 
wide variety and bigger hearts that surroimd each and 
everyone of us, with TLC. 

Mercedes Ruehl, who has already beenenmeshedwith 
the award syndrome for her role In "The Fisher King," 
transfers the role she played on Broadway to the big 
screen with unquestionable success. 

In playing die childlike and innocent, yet courageous 
Bella, she exudes a whimsical freshness that Is fiill of hope. 
She is fimny, she Is melancholy. She philosopiiizes while 
striving to understand the simple. 

Richard Dreyfus gives his usual perfect performance as 
her wisecracking gangster of a brother full of bluster whUe 
hiding the proverbial golden heart 

Irene Worth's Hitler-like Jewish immigrant is a master- 



piece of contradictions. 

Jay and Arty, played by Brad Stoll and Mike Damus, go 
to live with Worth, their grandmother in Yonkers when 
their father is forced to take to the road to earn a living. 

The visit is pregnant with valuable Insights, as they 
learn to love Bella's 
openess, Dreyfus's 
innate goodness, 
and even scratch 
the veneer of their 
grandmother's iron 
heart 

This is a family 
show about the 
innocence, igno- 
rance and racism 
of the 1940s, done 
with an expert 
toucli 

"Yonkers," 
rated PG, will have 
you smiling and 
crying, often both 
at the same time. 
Simon's talent with 
the human touch, Richard Dreyfus Mercedes Ruehl 

plus the fine cast, draws a four out of five star rating. 

This is one of the better Broadway-Hollywood transi- 
tions of a Simon creation, for like Stephen King, 
Hollywood usually fails to capture the real essence of his 
endeavors, —by GLORIA DAVIS 




\{^ Presents ^;^ 

''Let/s Get A. 
Divorce " 

Ay Vktorkn Sardou and Emilc de Najac 

This French farce on divorce is a 

guaranteed recipe for side-splitting fun and 

food for thought. 

Directed by Donna Badtke. 

June 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 
18, 19 & 20 

FrL & Sat 8 p.m.; 

Sunduy Matinee 2:30 p.m. 

Special Sat. Matinee June 12 at 2:30 p.m. 

Adults *8. Students & Seniors '6 

Cafl for Reservations 
395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main St.*Antioch 





r.iNf nw OotoN 

IrCVlU 



CiNEpUx OdEON TliEATRES 



RIVERTREEIGOURT 



*Super Mario Bros. (PG) 

1:00-3:10-5:20-7:30-9:40 



*SUver (R)(on 2 screens) 

1:1 5-2:00-3:45-4:30 -^:15-7:00-fl:45-9:30 



*HotShotst Part Deux (PG-13)(on 2 screens) 

1:00-2:00-2:55-3:55-4:50-5:50-6:45-7:45-8:40-9:40 



*Guilty as Sin (R) 

2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45 



Dave (PG-13) 

2:10-4:40-7:10-9:40 



Indecent Proposal (R) 

2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45 



*Cliffhanger (R) (on 2 serecns) 
1 :45-2:30-4 :1 5-5:00-6:4 5-7: 30-9:1 5-10:00 



*Made In America (PG-13) (on 2 screens) 
1 :3O-2:30-4:00-4:50-6:30-7:l 5-9:00-9:45 



*No Passes 




The following Information foVcIass reunions are: 

Grayslake Class of 1963 Is seeking classmates for a reunion 
tentatively set for July 24 at Gurnee Holiday Inn. Classmates 
should contact John Carlson at 362-5101. 

Barrlngton Class of 19B3 will be held Friday, Oct. 8, 
Homecoming weekend, Barrington Banquets In Harrington; 

Harrington Class of 1984 Is seeking classmates for 1994; 

Grayslake Class of 1983 will be held Saturday, OcL 16, 
Homecoming weekend, Holiday Inn In Mundeleln; 

Lake Zurich Class of 1973 will be held Saturday, Oct 9, 
Homecoming weekend, the Princess In Libertyville; 

Round Lake Class of 1983 will be held Saturday, Oct 2, 
Homecoming weekend, Holiday Inn in Mundeleln; 

Wauconda Class of 1983 will be held Friday, Oct. 1, 
Homecoming weekend, Harrington Banquets In Barrington; 

V^Tarren Class of 1983 will be held Saturday, OcL 16, the 
Princess in Libertyville; 

Warren Class of 1984 Is seeking classmates for 1994; 

Waukcgan Class of 1968 will be held Saturday, Aug, 7, 
Holiday Inn in Mundelein; 

Waukcgan Class of 1953 will be held Saturday, Aug. 21, 
Bonnie Brook Country Club in Waukegan; 

Zion-Benton Class of 1984 is seeking classmates for 1994. 

For more information contact Alumni Systems, Inc. at 
{815)477-0858 or (800)924-6643 (Chicago/suburban area only) 
or write to: Alumni Systems, Inc. 6201 Scoit Lane, Crystal Lake, 
IL 60014. 



LAKE ZURICH THEATRES 550-0000 

ROUTE 12-EAST OF ELA RD., LAKE ZURICH 

$6.00 ADULTS - $3.00 CHILDREN {UNDER 11) 

- -.-. MON..FRI. UNTIL 5 PM SO hn 

9;00 SAT. & SUN.-FIRST AFTERNOON SHOW O.UO 



ALL MOVIES AND TIMES START FRIDAY 6-4-93 



INDECENT PROPOSAL (R) 



1:35-3:45-6:10-8:30 



UFEWITHMIKEY(PG) 



2:304:30-6aO-a:30 



SUVER(R) 



1:45-4:10-621-8:35 



MADE IN AMERICA (PG1 3} 



120-350-6:35-9 



HOT SHOTS II (PQ1 3) 



2:30-420-6:15-8:10 



SUPER MARIO BROS. (PG) 



2:15430-6:45-8:55 



CUFFHANGER(fl) 



1:30-355-€25-8:55 



DAVE(PG13) 



ANTIOCH THEATRE 

378 LAKE ST. AFiriOCH 
395-0216 



2:00-4:15-625-8:55 



I UOO ADULTS $2.00 CHILD (11 & UNDER) 
$2.00 UrmL 5 PM 



CLIFFH ANGER (R) 



FRI. MON-THURS 630-9:00 
SAT & SUN 1:30-4-6:30-9 



LIBERTYVILLE 1 & 2 

• 708 N, MILWAUKEE 
. LIBERTYVILLE 
362-3011 



•2^ ADULTS *1 »* CHIU) (1 1 & UNDER) 
*1" 1ST AFTERNOON SHOW 

DRAGON (PG1 3) 

FR(. MON, THURS 6:15-8:45 
SAT & SUN 1:15-3:45-6:15-8:15 



»400 

ADULTS 



•2'* CHILD 
(1 1 & UNDER] 



•2" 1ST AFTERNOON SHOW 

LIFE WITH 
MIKEY (PG) 

FRI. MON. THURS 7-9 
SAT&SUN2:30-4:3O-7-9 



McHENRY 1 & 2 

1204 GREEN ST. McHENHY 
(815)365-0144 



M*" ADULTS *Z^ CHILD (1 1 & UNDER) '2°° TILL 5 PM 
LIFE WITH MIKEY (PG) FRI7.9 SAT.THURS2:3(M:3Q-7-9 



•1*" PER PERSON 
HAPPILY EVER AFTER 

SAT-THURS 2:15-4:15 



M 



Elizabeth Perkins in 

INDIAN SUMMER (PG) 



DAILY 6:45-8:45 



SHOWPLACE 1-8 815-455-1005 
ROUTE 14 & ROUTE 31 CRYSTAL LAKE 
$5.00 ADULTS - $3.00 CHILDREN {UNDER il) 

*^ *^** MON.-FRI. UNTIL 5 PM ._ ^_ 

'3.00 SAT. & SUN-FIRST AFTERNOON SHOW ^3.00 



ALL MOVIES AND TIMES START FRIDAY 6-4-93 



CLIFFHANGER(R) 



2.-05^:10-62S8.'35 



SLIVER (R) 



1:45^-6:4&fl;55 



HOT SHOTS H(PG13) 



220-420-6:30-820 



INDECENT PROPOSAL (R) 



2-4:15-6:30^:45 



SUPER MARIO BROTHERS (PG) 



2:i&4ao.7-9 



MADE IN AMERICA (PG13) 



155-4^5^:15-8:30 



DAVE(PG131 



WILLIAMS STREET 



SAT.-THURS. 150-355-6:40^:50 



GUILTY AS SIN (PG13) 

DAILY 2-4:15-6:45-9 



GRAYSLAKE OUTDOOR 

HT.83/RT. 120 GRAYSLAKE 

223-8155 



OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SHOW STARTS 130 

CUFFHANGER (R) 
ALSO BASIC INSTINCT (R 



I 



McHENRY OUTDOOR 
CHAPPELHILLRD, McHENRY 

815-385-0144 



OPEN? DAYS A WEEK SHOW STAflTS 130 

DRAGON (PG13) 
ALSO SLIVER (R 



t!f f IT! Tf ttlTTTTTtT 



5) ^ 

rxn 



30 toHoJCJRfCf l^*1i^.ipq)^jrii. 



FfJcr6y,tiiirf«^*/-iW3i 



»-,-..--. I'ir.t /:^»A ^n^ .^.\ii : 





Dining and Entertainment 




Lakeland 

\trwBpmptTS 



ACROSS 

1. Sp. painter 

2. Skier's place 
9. Crow's call 

12. First man 

13. Bide 
M.WWUorg/ 
IS. Seek 

shelter 

17. — Heflin 

18. Lopez theme 

19. Fr. river 
21. Agreements 

24. State 
positively ' 

25. God of love 

26. Branches off 

30. Broadway 
musical 

31. Languishes 

32. Altar phrase 

33. Precious 
stones 

35. Wt, allowance 

36. Wad of 
paper money 

37. Drying ovens 

38. Theater 
offering 

40. Chemical 
compound 

42. Concern of 
OPEC 

43. Bedspreads 

48. Former chess 
champ 

49. Shamrock's 
home 

50. Arab ruler 

51. Overhead rails 
53. Western city 

DOWN 

1. Ship's channel 

2. Harem room 

3. Wild ox of 
Tibet 




4. Catkins 

5. G.I.'s offense 

6. Etna output 

7. Slapstick 
projectile 

8. Struggles 

9. Model's top 
spot 

10. On — 

(equal to) 

11. Grow dim 
16. Salad plant 

20. Sun. talk 

21. Soccer star 

22. Lily plant 

24. The birds 

26. — pickle 

27. Neither Rep. 
nor Dem. 

28. "East of—" 

29. Habitual 



drunkards 
31. Magnificent 
houses 

34. Style of type: 

abbr. 

35. Cultivator 

37. Hebrew measure 

38. Lavish excess 
affection 



39. Coin of Iran 

40. Anagram of veil 

41. Hawaiian goose 

44. Money of 
account 

45. Uncle, in 
Scotland 

46. Type or 
foil lead-in 

47. Theater sign 




Sammy is young atheart 

Sammy is a blaclcand white male 



beagle. At age 10, Sammy is a senior cit- 
izen who doesn't look, feel or act his 
age. Sturdy and active, this delightful 
dog Is in good health and very playful. 
Sanmiy loves people. He is also excep- 
tionally sweet — a lovable attentive tall- 
wagger who will eagerly soak up all the 
love you can give him, and return it 
with a beagle's special brand of loyal 
companionship. 

Sammy deserves to find an excel- 
lent home where he can spend his 
golden years. This little guy is young at 
heart, where it really counts! Sammy is 
in cage 82 and can be adopted for a $55 
cash donation. Fees include 
spay/neuter, collar, tag, leash, follow- 
up care, first shots and more. 

OrphEuis of the Storm is located at 




Sammy 



2200 Kiverwoods Rd. in DeerfUed.' 
Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., seven days 
a week. Call 945-0235 for further infor- 
mation. 



A lifetime of companionship 



Many wonderful cats (and dogs) are 
available for immediate adoption! 
Please consider adopting one of these 
affectionate, beautifully, but homeless 
animals! Although they are not usually 
"purebreds," they are full of love and 
will provide a lifetime of loyal compan- 
ionship. 

For adoption information call the 
Assisl Animal Foundation at (815)455- 
9411. Adoption fees include spay or 
neuter and shots. 




Pudge 



African-American settler researched 



Amos Bennett, Lake 
County's first African- 
American settler, is being 
researched by staff at the 
Lake County Forest 
Preserve's Lake County 
Museimi. Bennett is the 
first of a series of 
tiistorical minority figures 
being researched by the 
Museum. 

Little hiformation on 
Bennett has been pub- 
lished and extensive re- 
search has never before 
been attempted. The 
search Involves the coop- 
eration of several historic 
institutions. It is being 
supported by Jimmy 



Dorsey, a leader In Lake 
County's 

African-American com- 
munity and Sociology 
Professor at the College of 
Lake County. 

Preliminary findings 
have revealed that Ben- 
nett was not a "squatter," 
as previously believed, 
but the owner of several 
parcels of land in Warren 
Township between 1843 
and 1852. Though docu- 
mentation has not yet 
been found, there are in- 
dications that Daniel 
Wright, who has been tra- 
ditionally honored as the 
first non- Native American 



to settle in the county, 
may have been preceded 
by Bennett in 1834. 

An article on the Ben- 
nett research appears in 
the current issue of the 
Lake County Museum As- 
sociation's Historian 
newsletter. An upcoming 
issue will feature addi- 
tional information on the 
project. For a free copy, 
caU 526-7878. 

The Lake County 
Museum is located in 
Lakewood Forest Preserve 
near Wauconda, on Route 
176 just west of Fairfield 
Road. 



ARIES (March 21 to April 19) The 
week will begin on an inspirational 
note, but duties relating to others have 
to be attended to later in the week. You 
will be tempted to goof off some at 
work this week, but avoid this. Use 
your powers of concentratvon. A meet- 
ing with close ties brings you pleasant 
surprises. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) 
Domestic interests are favored this 
week, but ethical considerations arc 
paramount on the job. An extra career 
push pays dividends now, but refrain 
from mixing business \yith pleasure. 
Leisure plans are subject to possible 
change. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Hnd 
less expensive ways to have fun this 
week. Your domcsdc routine is liable 
to be upset in some way later in die 
week. However, do be flexible about 
ihis. Find an outlet for extra creative 
energy over the weekend. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) At- 
tend to domestic duties early in the 
week. Midweek, shop for the home, 
but use care in speech since 
misunderstandings could arise later. 
An on-again, off-again deal could try 
your patience, but hang in there. Shar- 
ing, ideas with a loved one increases 
rapport. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) Be more 
optimistic about a certain work project. 
You'll make a purchase this week that 
you*re destined to be proud of. Unex- 
pected expenses could arise while you 
are having fun tills weekend, so be 
prepared. Utilize creative talents. 

VIRGO (August 23 to September 
22) You work best this week from 
behind the scenes. Privacy abets ac- 
complishment. You'll come up with 
the answers to that troublesome busi- 
ness matter. Avoid overdoing jhe so- 
cial scene this weekend. A sudden urge 
leads to a nice purchase for the home. 



LIBRA (September 23 to October 
22) Don't be reluctant to face a domes- 
tic responsibility. This week, you 
should get yoursocializing in early. As 
the week wanes, you Ml want some 
privacy for yourself and your mate. 
Romance is in the stars this weekend. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem- 
ber 21) Though career progress is as- 
sured this week, you seem, to be 
troubled inwardly. Think positively. 
Don't dwell on present limitations. As 
you've discovered, time has a way of 
taking care of these things. 

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to 
December 21) Happy news will come 
from afar, but stick to tried-and-tme 
mothods carecrwise. Curb ec- 
centricities that could irritate a higher- 
up. People around you may not be 
totally straightforward, so listen care- 
^lly to what's being said. 

CAPRICORN (December 22 to 
January 19) Patience is usually your 
virtue, yet this week you may be 
anxious about success. Don't grumble 
about extra responsibilities you may 
have to assume. Bypass go-betweens 
and present your viewpoint to higher- 
ups in person. '' 

AQUARIUS (January 20 ' to 
Febniary 18) Though increased rap- 
port with a close tic makes for happi- 
ness, you both have to curb a tendency 
to spend beyond your means while in 
your euphoric state. Creative types 
should meet with agents and advisers 
this week. Tliis weekend, travel brings 
benefits. 

PISCES (Febraary 19 to March 20) 
A friend involves you with a personal 
problem, but you should expect real 
progress at work. Acquaintances are 
unpredictable later this week. Close 
ties exhibit changeable dispositions, 
yet are somewhat demanding. This 
weekend, privacy allows you to put 

your accounts in order. 

01093 by Kins Futima SyniL 



Adler director resigns 



The David Adler Cul- 
tural Center, located in 
Libertyville, accepted the 
resignation of Richard 
Friedman, the Center's 
Executive Director. "The 
Center has provided some 
wonderful programming 
during Richard's tenure," 
according to Jeff Robin- 
son, Chairman of the Cen- 
ter's Board of Directore. 

"While his departure 
will leave us without a 
full-time executive direc- 
tor for the short term, we 
have a highly talented 
staff who are capable of 
continuing the current 
level of programming. 
Also, our teachers are a 
strong group of skilled in- 
structors. The search for 
Richard's successor will 
commence after the board 
has clearly defined the 
Center's needs." Current 
programs including the 
Center's music and arts 
programming will con- 
tinue uninterrupted. 
Management of the Cen- 
ter is being provided dur- 
ing the short term by exist- 
ing staff members as well 
as active participation by 



various Board members. 

Richard expressed his 
personal thanks to the 
Village of Libertyville and 
the companies, individu- 
als and staff members 
who provided strong 
support to the Center 
during his.year-and-a-half 
term as Executive 
Director. "The Center has 
ambitious plans for the 
future. To achieve its 
goals, it is Important that 
the Board and Executive 
Director are 

philosophically aligned 
as to the management of 
the Center's affairs. It 
would not have been 
possible to achieve either 
my goals or the Center's 
without a stronger sense 
of harmony." Despite iiis 
resignation, Richard said 
that the Center's stated 
mission is one that he en- 
dorses and that the Center 
Is worthy of continuing 
community, corporate 
and individual support. 

The David Adler Cul- 
tural Center is dedicated 
to promoting the cultural 
arts as integral parts of 
everyday life. Its 



Take a hike for National 



Two afternoon pro- 
grams to mark National 
Trails Day on Saturday, 
June 5 are planned by the 
Lake County Forest Pre- 
serves along the Des 
Plaines River Trail. 

A two -mile long natu- 
ralist-guided hike will 
leave from Half Day 
Forest Preserve near 
Vernon Hills at 1:30 p.m. 
At the same time, a 
15-mile long guided bike 
ride Vfcdll depart from Van 
Patten Woods Forest 
Preserve near Wadsworth, 

National Trails Day is 



the brainchild of the 
American Hiking Society, 
and is being sponsored by 
numerous outdoor recre- 
ation equipment manu- 
facturers and retailers, the 
U.S. Department of the 
Interior, and local agen- 
cies such as the Lake 
County Forest Preserves. 
The Lake County events 
are just two of more than 
2,000 similar programs on 
trails from Maine to Cali- 
fornia. 

Both the hike and the 
bike ride are for ages 12 
through adult There is a 



year-round activities are 
designed to foster critical 
thinking and interpreta- 
tion, participation, enter- 
tainment and achieve- 
ment in the arts and for 
the people of northern 
Illinois and southern Wis- 
consin. The Cultural Cen- 
ter also maintains \ and in- 
terprets the historic home 
of architect David Adler, 
located in Libertyville, 
Illinois, which is the base 
of its activities and a visual 
image of the harmony 
between art and daily life. 

The focus of the Cen- 
ter's programming is the 
presentation of art and 
artistic activity wiiich is an 
integral part of everyday 
life. In such, the Center 
seeks to reflect an inter- 
disciplinary perspective 
that is diverse, yet bal- 
anced in content and 
artistic media. Program- 
ming seeks to be accessi- 
ble to Individuals of all 
ages, backgrounds and in- 
terest, providing oppor- 
tunities for in-depth par- 
ticipation ^nd apprecia-' 
tion of the arts. 



Trails Day 

fee of $2 per person ($1 
for Lake " County 
residents). Reservations 
are required; call 
(708)948-7750. 

In addition to the 18 
miles of the Des Plaines 
River Trail already com- 
pleted, there are 51 miles 
of trails for hlldng, bicy- 
cling, horseback riding 
and physical fitness in the 
Lake County Forest Pre- 
serves. Trail users can call 
367-6640 for maps of the 
Des Plaines River Trail 
and information on other 
trails. 



'J I 



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Friday. |Jun% 4.. lj?9?:t 



Lakeland N«wtpapei$.3Ll . 



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COUPON 



tSumrriBr 



I ^1.99 Appetizer I 

1 Your ajotcc; Potnlo SkJiis, nuffalo Wings, nroadcrt MoTzarclla, MUcd Vcggte Basket, • | 

Nadios, Crispy Itavlotis or Basket of MushtTMms. ■ 

Uinlt One Coupon I'cr Person, i:)!pirc5 luno 30. 1903. Not Good WIUi Any OUicrOITcrs. | 






R]*s Eatery 

& The Outback Bar 



Vte^ 1 91 3 E. Grand Ave. ♦ LIndenhurst 




^*^»it^^ 



♦DOUBL£ DECKER ♦ phone 356-2300 

THIN CRUST ♦PAN PIZZA Open Mon.-Fri. 1 1 a.m.; Sa!.-Sun. a a.m. 



se 




Summer of fun 
and food at RJ's 



Beat the summer heat by enjoying a 
cool drink and great food at RJ's Eatery 
and Outback Bar. Overlooking Sand Lake 
in Lindcnhurst, cool down on the outside 
deck or inside with the magnificent lake 
view seating. 

While watching water skiers and the 
panorama of boats, enjoy the daily drink 
specials. Several specialty drinks, 
available with or without alcohol, are 
made from scratch. 

Bring the gang into the Outback Bar to 
watch all of the sporting events. Don't 
miss Sand Volleyball Night on Tuesdays 
or iJie Dart Leagues. 

Keep an eye out for ihc Summer Beach 
Party, scheduled at the end June. Games, 
prizes, and even a DJ are planned. 

RJ's offers daily all-you-can-eat-meals. 
On Sunday, enjoy cither ilie roast pork or 
turkey. Included with dinner is the salad 
bar witli all fresh fruits and vegetables. 

AU-you-can-eal pi/.za night is Tuesday. 
Enjoy the famous RJ's thin crust cheese 
and sausage pixza for only $3.95. For 
only $1.95 more, munch on the fresh 
salad bar. 

Fridays are for fish frys, and RJ's fry is 
the best! For only $6.95, all you can cat 
fresh North Atlantic cod deep-fried in a 
special beer batter is served up with a 
choice of potato, vegetables, breadsticks, 
soup or salad bar. 



Head back over on Saturdays for the 
Alaskan snow crab legs with drawn 
butter, lemon, choice of potato, 
vegetables, soup or salad bar. And, for 
only $13.95 you can eat all that you 
want! 

Start your week off by sampling RJ's 
Sunday morning breakfast buffet. From 9 
a.m. to 1 p.m. enjoy the eggs, bacon, 
sausage, waffles, pancakes, frcnch toast 
sticks, biscuits and gravy, fresh fruit and 
more for only $5.95. And, for seniors 
and children, only $3.95. 

Really enjoy your summer vacation by 
stopping over to RJ's for lunch. There 
arc daily specials starting from $3.95. 
Grab a burger, sandwich, or graze the 
salad bar while enjoying the activity on 
Sand Lake. 

The service is excellent at RJ's. Some 
of the staff have been there since tlic 
restaurant opened. Good service and good 
food arc RJ's slock and trade. 

Have your family reunion at RJ's. 
They can accommodate groups up to 100 
people. Special occasions such as 
graduations, wedding showers, or any 
otiier parly can be perfect at RJ's. 

RJ's Eatery is located at 1913 E, Grand 
Avenue in LindenhursL Come on in and 
enjoy the dining room and the Outback 
Bar. Carry-out is also offered. For more 
information call 356-2300. 






Sj '/IndAnmenatyS. 
t^ \ Delicious Poultry J 



Open 7 days a wee)( 

for Dinner. Mon.-Frl, 

for Lunch 



2nd Anniversary Open House 

June 8th 9th 8i 10 -Try The Style 

Of Chef Ron &. Paul - Live Music 

ii^^^L$^!^!i^^ I Rnriecoratert Rritrvwav * 






piiy'iyinijerSntreie. 



L 



Redecorated Entryvyayi 
SparklingNcw#^l 
Glassware . Crisp New: ; 
Table UnensiNev/ 

Experience the fresh new Longhom — 
An Old Favorite — Better Than Evert 

OnRt. 120 -2 1/2 mllos 
WostofRt. 12onLllyLako 
10 minuloa west of Grayal 

(815)385-9869 



59 ^^-''"'S^ O^UtVWoun 



"Dining 

Room 

•Cocktail 

Lounge 

•Catering 

•Banquet 

Faclllticft 




Jms 

"- rmi fooo 



June S p ecjaIs! 
oKlNq CflAb Leqs , . ?14" 

One Pull PouNdll Stiivcd Nliily 

f-fomCMAdc Ice OirAM Pics 
Sofr Scitvc Lou/Im Yoc,uiir 

Plus Many DiffeneMr 
NiTcly SpeciAls 

KAIIAokc ENTERTAiNMCNT On 

SATundAys In Our LouNqctlt 

fofN Ui On ChiH BcAviifvl Deck OvtHlookiNCf 

UANqi LaIcc fm SpccUl AppciucHi On 

CooitNTf CocktMlitl 

SuNdJAy BRUNch 

rrAluRinq 0«tc1[liC5 cooluti lo orcJcr l»y Chtl 

Kitly, plus A liiir,t MvoRtMCNr ol dor buAUMi 

tNiuro plus A pA^nry iaIiIc. 

A(luln...'8.9; Kidf (10&UNdEi)...'9.9; 



313 E. LIBERTY WAUCONDA 
"OveriooldngBeautiJul Bangt Lake" 



526-6905 




Undtr 

New 

Otmtnkif 



The Village Inn 



of Wauconda 

Setving good food, fine spirits and a 
tasteful blend of new and old ambiance 

Kitchon Serving 1 1 B.m.-0 p.m. Daily (Mon.-Thure,) 
FrI.-Sat. Serving Til 10 p,m, 



Check Out Our Lunch And Dinnei- Specials 

.14 oz, T-Bone Steak onkod poiaio, z»i*d — ..«.„.„$7,95 

Baby Back Ribs sj«w, pouio ...^—-..,$9.95 

Buffalo Wlngs.„.10pc $2.98..- 20 pc $5.49 

2 Pork Chops Aii GrtUn PoUto^ Vcg, Apple S5uce....$6.95 

TrypurNewyniageInn PatatoSkloa 



Big Screen TV • Game Room • Monthly Drink Specials 
202 S. Main St • Wauconda 

(708)526-8130 




We' re Creating A Rea l Stir! 

stiff m 



ORIEHTAL STIR FRY 

•Beat Egg Rolls In Town! 
•Seloctlons Includo Appellors 
Chicken, B«ef & Vogelarlan Entrees 






FAMILY DINING CARRY-OUT 



OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 
ei/i^. TMRU THURS. 11-B; FRI.-SAT. 1 1TO 10 

Wo cater your patty or sptclal event, 
five ordcro or mora will be dellvertd. 
THE RIGHT CHOICE... 




We're the fresfi 
alternative to fast foodi 

Inquire about (ranchtw opporlunllln 



949-7912 



FAX YOUR ORDER 949-7968 
. (Comer Of Rts. 60 & 45) 
1565 S. LAKE ST. (JowelA/onturo Stiop. Cnlr.) MUNDELEIN 



■(■" 






RESTAURANT 
LOUNGE 



* 
^ 



4b 

4k 




OPEN DAILY * 
11:00AM ♦ 

'ThtenectJonHwy41^ 
&I37(Buckle!yRd) f' 

Phone 689-9062 t 
THE HAPPENING PtAiGE J 

Great Food - Reasonable Prices - > 
NICE ATMOSPHERE : ^ 

I|b4k^4b4k4k4b4b4k4b^4k#b^^^>4b4k4h4b4k4b^4b4k4b^4bf 




FCIXVCl^MOORr 

FAMILY RESTAURANT 



BREAKFAST • LUNCH * DINNER * OPEN 24 HR. 



PHONE NlceATMOSPHERE-R£ASONABL£PntCES-FAST SERVICE 

708-689-0733 1/4 mile So. of Rt. 137 on Rl. 41 




; 






Jerry & Bartons 
GRATTAN'S WHARF 

On Deep Lake Rt. 132 To 

Deep Lake Rd. Left on 2nd St. 

356-0005 

FRIDAY NIGHT FISH FRY & BOIL 

All-You-Can-Eat ^ 

Lako Porch & Cod, Coleslaw, 
Potato Pancakes. Now England •*""t5'ft''und.°r"°" 
Clam Chowder 75c a cup »4.»5 

THURSDAY KARAOKE NIGHT 





With Uz Ohilnger 7pm-? 

Sundays 5 pm - 7 

Roy Fefguson on the Keyboard 




. JUNE 4 & 5 

Stofy Out Tonight! 



SAT. BABY BACK RIBS 

8«rved with Soup, Galad & Potato 

Full Slab S1 1.95 HalfS6.95 ;, 
HVEEKEND 



Meat Raffle Every Sunday 12 Noon 



^ 



^CBtmirnnt 8c banquet ^ncilitita 

Sunday Dinners 



Dinners start with our famous 
Lazy Susan with liver patd, cheese 
spread, spiced apples and Z sur- 
prise salads. Choose from 22 
entrees of seafood, beef, veai or 
poultry; a tossed salad or our 
spinach salad with warm vinegar 
dressing; choice of potatoes or 
vegetable, rolls and butter. 
PLUS 
Our Specials of the Day 
include beverage and dessert 



Your 

hosts, 

BiU & Kris 

Govas 

(708) 223-0121 

intersection 

Rte. 120&45, 

Graysloke, IL 

All major credit 

cards nonoredly 



32 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday, June 4, 1993 



r-j**»****ftV •■■,».•,- .^—•^ r"-; 



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''f5T?'!*r?rsr?;'Tr5!.'TrrT!?:nJL'jT^ : 



CONGRATULATIONS 




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Liberty ville Commmunity High School 



Libertyville Commu- 
nity High School has 
named candidates for the 
graduating class of 1993: 

Christine Abram, 
Chrisopher Ackman, Rene 
Acosta, Fiona Alfercz, Cairie 
Alford, Sbumaila All, Erin Al- 
lison, Emily Anderson, Kath- 
leen Anderson, Mark Anders- 
son, Todd Arbilure, Gonzalo 
Ardila, Carrie Arnesen, 
Mauricio Arroyave, C. 
William Avgerin, Kristin Ba- 
chochin, Keith Bainbridge, 
Karyn Baldwin, Beth Balian- 
tini, Shane Barrettsmitb, 
Sandra Bairy, Sandra B artels, 
Arsvid Basavapatbruni, 
Kathcrine Bates, Thomas 
Bean, Sheri Berg, Tyler Berg. 

Bonnie Bernero, Kim- 
berly Bcrnhard, David Bern- 
stein. Matt Bcrnthal, Joseph 
Best, Amit Bbatia, Tory Bill- 
berg, SheiLa Blue, Amanda 
Boisaubin, Vidmantas Bor- 
eika, Scott Bowen, Tracy 
Brassfield, Tracy Braverman, 
Scott Brcbncr, Dan Breslcr, 
Cory Bristow, Christopher 
Brown, Corla Brown, Sarah 
Brown, Ken Brzczinski, 
Kathcrine Bull, Meghan 
Burke, Brenda Busscher, 
Kathryn Calabrcsa, Melissa 
Calanca, Amy Camitta, David 
Camilta, Jason Camp, Maria 
Campos, Victor Capron. 



Ann^ia Caputo, John 
Cargill, Roy Carrington, Jr., 
Eric Casey, Courtney Cecil, 
Erik Cevallos, Lauren Cham- 
berlain, Christopher Charap- 
ata, Paul Cho, Lisa Chu, 
Richard Chung, Brian 
Church, Katherine Ciancio, 
Nicole Cirrincione, Laura 
Ciszewski, Jeffery CiuUo, 
John Clark, Kathleen Cle- 
land, Joshua Clement, Scott 
Coconate, Jason Coleman, 
Rebecca Coleman, Sean Con- 
nolly, Sarah Cook, Kelly 
Cooper, Mark Cox, Michael 
Crane, Rebecca Cromie, 
Steven Cwik, Shoma Das. 

Cody David, Jason 
Dchn, Brett DcKirmandjian, 
Ramon Salto, Romina Del- 
rOmodarmc, Raymund Del- 
lota, Eric Deloy, Jennine De- 
nis, Anthony DeRose, Anar 
Desai, Mitul Desai.Satyajit 
Dcshmukh, Katherine De- 
vaine, James Dickson, Utpal 
Dighc, Joel Disselkoen, 
Dennis Dobrin, Jason 
Dolinar, Christine Domanik, 
Bridget Donegan, Karen 
Dom, PEter Dousman, Nicole 
Drumm, Wendy DuFour, 
James Duncan, Dennis Dunn, 
Patricia Dunn, Sean Dunn, 
Predrag Dupor, Cbirs Duszak. 

Megan Dykas, Michael 
Egidi, Amy Eichelberger, 
Meghan Eidcn, Kurtis Estcp, 



IDSTEIN 

Mortgage 
Services 


One-On-One 
Service 


KEN IDSTEIN ^^^ 


549 N. Route 83 
P.O. Box 244 
1 Grayslake, IL 60030-0244 


708-223-0044 



HIGHLAND M 

CORPORATION 

1 82 Stripe Ct. 
Waukegan, IL 

708) 360-0880 

Alum. Cans, Copper Brass, 

Alunrtlnunn, Lead. Auto. Batteries and 

Radiators, Catalytic Converters 



Fair Prices • Honest Weight 





Jenny Faith, Cynthia Falk, 
Steven Fandrei, Mina 
Farhadieh, Shane Farr, Amy 
Parrell, Regina Fearmonti, 
Benjamin Feen, Tara Fellows, 
William Fellows, Shawn 
Fielding, Todd Finkel, 
Heather Fiore, Josephine 
Fleming, Kevin Fletcher, 
Lauren Frank, Lisa Frederik- 
sen, Scott Freed, Robert Ful- 
bright, Juan Garcia, Scott 
Garland, Rob Gebrke, Andrea 
Geraldi, Andrew Giddens, 
Mindi Gjertscn. 

J. Jon Goerig, Mari 
Ooodridge, Carlcy Grange, 
Thelma Grcfalda, Amy " 
Grimm, Phillip Grundberg, 
Kathleen Guamery, Phil Guer- 
rero, Andrea Guerriero, Jason 
Gumbiner, Noshir Gunja, 
Kerry Gustafson, Maijoreen 
Hachmeister, Teresa Halver- 
son, Adam Hannigan, 
Matthew Hanson, Christer 
Haraldsson, Kathleen 
Harkins, Carolyn Harrison, 
Kathleen Hart, James Harvey, 
Todd Heal, Brian Heider, Re- 
becca Hcider, Brandt 
Heinzinger, Alexander Heldt, 
Bridget Henry, Nicole Her- 
beck, Tracey Hermann, J. 

Scooter Hill. 

Heather Hines, Raymond 

Hoadlcy, Rachel Hoover, 

Benjamin Howard, Elliott 

Hsu, Victor Hsu, Kimberline 

Huff, Kimberly Hughes, Kyun 




Choral concert 



Libertyville High School orchestra performs during the Spring Choral 
Concert. — Photo by James G.Schwarz 



Hub, Geoffrey Hume, Stephen 
Humphrey, Brandon Hunter, 
Amy Huntoon, Jung Hur, 
James Hurlston, Melissa Im- 
mcl. Kirk Jackson, Adam Ja- 
cobson, Steve Jansen, 
Thomas Janett, Julie Jarzem- 
bowski, Patrick Jennctten, 
■Bethany Johnson, Christo- 
pher Johnson, Julie Johnson, 
Sally Johnson, Barbara Jor- 
dan, Anne Joseph, Roshan 
Jole, Tiffanie Juengst. 

Christine Jurasik, 
Michael Kabakoff, Erin 



Kabot, Dimilrios Kallieris, 
Edward Kang, Melissa Kann, 
Mark Kappte, Kimberly Ka- 
vanagh, Jon Kazmicrski, 
Luke Kazmierski, Timothy 
Kelley, Erika Kelly, David 
Kelton, David Kelton, Noel 
Kemeny, Jennifer Kemp, 
Brian King, Jennifer Klap- 
penbach, Brian Kleinfeldt, 
Ryan Klingeman, Keith 
Klunder, Anne Kohut, Jason 
Kopemy, David Kosowski, 
Daniel Kramer, Stacey Kruzic, 
Veena Kulkarni, Shilajit 



Good JCuckfrom the People at 

FOX LAKE 
JEAVELRY f^ 

34 E. Grand, Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-5241 



Like a 

food neighbor, 
tateFarm 
is there. 




See me for 

car, home, life 

and health 

insurance. 



ttAtI fAlM 



IHIUIANCI 



Stat* Fami Insurant 
Companies Horm Off le«s 
Btoomlngton, llllnob 



RODIWEMA 

33149 N.Hwy, 45 
Grayslake, IL 

(708) 223-5882 



Kundu, Kristine Kurszewski, 
Amy Lagrimanta, Melanie 
Lamz. 

Sarah Lamz, J. Michael- 
Larsen, Heather Lauer, Renee 
LaVista, Kathleen Leniban, 
James Lewis, Christina Lib- 
crto, Michael LiUeberg, Paul 
Lim, Larice Lima, John 
Loizzo, JoyceLonergan, 
Elena Lorio, James Lotko, 
Jeffrey Lovett, Stephen Lu, 
Lauren Kukasik, Jamey Mack, 
Adam Maddox, Adam Magary, 

(Continued on page 2B) 



^^ 



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COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY 



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Grayslake, Illinois 

(708) 223-3636 







>1 

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A 
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1675 Delany Road 
Gurnee, IL 60031-1232 

Phone: (708)662-2666 



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(Continued from page IB) 

Nicole Magel, Jessica Mag- 
gie, Erica Magnus, Don 
Mahlmeister, Susanne Main. 
Jason MaUace, Carmen Mann 
Andrew Manton, Meegan 
March, Morgan Marshall. 

Angela Martin, Kristin 
Martin, Anna Matras, David 
Maurath, David Mayfield, 
Meggan McAndrevvs, Jennifer 
McBeath. Michael McCaulcy, 
Adrian McDermott. Tracy 
McDermott, Kathryn McDon- 
ald, Meghan McKinney. 
Kclcy McLaughlin, Jennifer 
McLenagban, Michael 
McMahon, Marjorie 
Mehling, Moha Mehtai Adam 
Meyer, Kelly Miller, Serge 
Minin, Amy Mix, Sieve 
Moon, David Mooney, Lynn 
Moore, Dana Moorhead, An- 



gela Morris, Jason Morris, 
Kristi Mosier, Jamie Mueller, 
Josh Munson. 

Temple Murphy, Adam 
Nadlcr, David Nahorski, Amer 
Naslund, Mandy Navarro, Ja- 
son Nazarof, M. Robert Net- 
tles, Matthew Neumann, SiU 
vana Nicoletti, Kristcn 
Niesen, Julia Noack, Stephen 
Noce, Iris Nunag, Matthew 
O'Connell, Edward O'Dwycr, 
Jane Oakley, Kathryn 
Oboikowitch, Rachel Or, Pa- 
tricia Otto, Jay OucUette, 
Heather Owen, Michael 
Pacatte, Timothy Padera, 
Melissa Pajak, Tim Pan- 
thcr.Samccr Parekh, Shawn 
Park, Lynn Parrino, Christo- 
pher Patterson, Ryan Pazdur. 

Shawn Pedcrsen, Jen- 



nifer Peic, Robert Pcrdur, m, 
Carrie Pcrrin, Stephen Perry, 
Craig Petersen, Kimbcrly Pe- 
terson, Peter Peterson, Vical 
Peterson, Erik Pfaffenbach, 
Todd Phelps, Jodi Pierce. 
Kristin Plewe, Nicolette 
Polydoros, Michael Pructcr, 
Karilynn Purcell, Michelle 
Quick, Timothy Quirke, 
Karen Rancourt, Eric Randall, 
Jason Raney, Mark Ray- 
mond. Tiffani Reder, Randy 
Redrick, Thomas Rehder, H, 
William Rcitz, Benjamin 
Richards, Mark Richardson, 
Michael Richardson, Jacque- 
line Richert. 

Jennifer Rider, Eun Rii, 
Steve Rim, Jennifer Rock- 
strob, Kevin Roi, Saxton 
Rose, Eric Roseland, Cynthia 
Rosenthal, Nicholas Rozzi, 



Carmel High School 



Caraiel High School has 
named the candidates for the 
graduating class of 1993: 

Jay Almblad, Lisa Am- 
borski, Leslie Anderson, 
Chris Anilao, Anthony An- 
tognoli, Christopher Bace- 
howski, Angela Baldassano, 
Tristia Barrett, Jeffrey Ben- 
jamin, Russell Bercier, Julie 
Berger, Kenneth Bcrryhill, 
James Bcrtucci, Mary Boigcr, 
Michelle Boycc, Brcnda 
Boydston, Julie Bretsnyder, 
Thomas Brown, Jamie Bructt, 
Justin Buchenberger, Michael 
Byrne, Laura Cain, James 
Calabrese, Jeffrey Calandra, 
Rocco Campanella, Piper 
Cannon, Claudinc Cappcllc, 
Dennis Carroll, Kristcn 
Cams, Steven Casper. 

Rocco CastcUano, Am- 
bcrly Castricone, Victor Cas- 
tro, Sarah Catancsc, Gina 
Cecchi, Jason Chorzay, Eric 
Cibula, Jadaun Clark, Olivia 
Clark, Kelly Clayton, An- 



thony CIcsceri, Michael 
Clunc, Emilia Cole, Angela 
Collins, Kevin Conarchy, 
Rebecca Connolly, John 
Conrad, Joseph Couto, 
Christina Crosbie, Michael 
Crowley, Frank Crudele, Mar- 
cus Cunnie, Brycc Cyrzan, 
Rence Czerwinski, Christo- 
pher D'Amico, Stephanie 
Dawson, Michelle Dekoj, 
Jessica De La Garza. Kelly 
Dclahanty, Gina Dcmkc. 

Kale Dcmuth, Anne De- 
Prima, Jennifer DiGirolamo, 
Sarah Donahue, Jeffrey Dowl- 
ing, Leslie Drennan, Daniel 
Drew, April Ducat, Steven Du- 
fault, Edward Dwyer, Alex 
Eastburg, Jennifer Eberhardt, 
Danielle Eigner, Elizabeth El- 
liott, Kurt Engelbrecbt, 
Robert Fallon, Amy Fc- 
linczak, Dawn Fishman, 
Michelle Flanders, Bayyan 
Foster, Jessica Frank, Jeremy 
Franz, James Friddell, Jill 
Gaffncy, Brian Gira, Ryan 
Godwin, Timothy Graham, 



Michael Gray, Marc Grole, 
Christopher Guidici. 

Magen Haiduke, Elizabeth 
Hamilton, Courtney Hamm, 
Joseph Harkin, Peter Harring- 
ton, Deanna Hertel, Robert 
Hilty, Elizabeth Hoffman, 
Megan Hudson, Brian 
Hughes, Patrick Hughes, 
James Imle, Christine Irvine, 
Michelle Janda, Lisa Jasin- 
ski, Jennifer Jedd, Brigit 
Johnson, Joseph Justice, 
Melissa Katinoski, Bradley 
Kalk, Jamie Kania, Ryan 
Kecgan, Al Kirchmeyer, 
Thomas Klcine, Douglas 
Koelper, Erin Konen, Kris- 
tine Konen, Iva Korytowski, 
Whitney Kuhlin, Brian 
Kurowski. 

Karen Kvaas, David Kwa- 
siborski, Lawrence Lahr, 
Jeanne Laidley, Tracy Lalasz, 
Christina Lamane, Christo- 
pher Larson, Erik Larson, 
Constance Lassc, Samantha 
Leahy, Albert Ledet, Juliana 



Michael Rubin, Michael 
Rudd, Eileen Runtz, Steve 
Rust, Christopher Ryan, 
Mark Rydberg, Amy 
Salaschc. Lisa Samuel, 
Cuauhtemoc Sandoval, Laura 
Sanford, Aaron Sardina, 
Kcndra Schneider, Stephanie 
Schreibcr, Keith Schulicn, 
Craig Schultz, Jeffrcry 
Schultz, Erin Scott, Esther 
See, Meghan Scgerson, Jen- 
nifer Selph, Neha Shah. 

Steven Shaw, Salil 
Shenoy, Divya Shroff, Jen- 
nifer Shu, Nicole Sicuro, 
Aron Silverton, Carolyn 
Sime. Marc Skalc, Michael 
Slago, Melissa Smagacz, 
Tracy Smaron, Alexis Smith, 
Ryan Snow, Min Song, An- 
drew Spaudie, Adam Spitzer, 
Daniel St. Martin. Brian 



Siach, Rebecca Stein, 
Colleen Stephens, Luke Ster- 
ling, Chris Stock, Michael 
Stosek, Laura Strittmalter, 
Margaret Stroupe, Courtney. 
Stuedemann, Mark Stukel, 
Steven Stutzke, Christina 
Swartzfager, Thomas 
Swcazey. 

Kevin Tate, Arbi Tat- 
cvosian, Jason Taylor, Echell 
Thomas, Timothy Thomp- 
son, Kevin Thunholm, 
Martha Toberman, Jennifer 
Tokarz, Leslie Tomila, Gin- 
ger Torres, Amy Towne, 
Maria Tuazon, Kristinc Tu- 
mino," Brian Tumbaugh, Anne 
Unger, Jason Heirseele, 
Deanna Trceck, Nicole 
Vavrik, Magdaline Vervilos, 
Alexander Vodicka, James 
Vogel, Prceya Vyas, Paul 



Wachtcl, Sarah Wallner, 
Ryan Walter, Christopher 
Ward, Ethan Waugh, Nicole 
Weaver, Susan Webb, Susan 
Weber. 

Helene Wecker, Christo- 
pher Wedig, Hillary Weigel, 
David Weik, DatxeU Wells, 
Heather Wesson, Trisha 
West, Nathan Westin, Eric 
Wiesneth, Paul Wilcher, 
Michael Wilkens, Kelly 
Wilkinson, Cindy Williams, 
Emilie Wilson, Kenneth 
Winkin, Jill Witsoe, Chris- 
tine Wojczynski, Kimbcrly 
Wolavka, Matthew Wolvcr- 
ton, Kathryn Wotman, Kelly 
Wraight, Kimbcrly Wright, 
Yi Yang, Karen Yec, Allison 
Zacny, Jeffrey Zcmalis, and 
Heather Zimmerman. 



Lehman, Jennifer Leicbl, Jan- 
ice Leidcr, Megan Leider, 
Meghan Levins, Timothy 
Lczon, Kelly Link, Nicole 
Linne, Corinnc Locuss, 
Arthur Loud, John Lynch, 
Brandon Mack, Michael Mal- 
ham, Joshua Malloy, Jennifer 
Marcelo, Aimcc Marlowe, 
Jennifer Marrs, Edward 
Maschek, Mandy Matczyn- 
ski. 

Nelson Matias, Valeric 
Mattson, Brian May, Kelly 
McDermott, Amy McGcc, 
Adam McNeill, Michael Mc- 
Swincy, Daniel Medina, Kara 
Meldahl, Kristcn Mco, Miles 
Mibeck, Sarah Mikrut, Char- 
lene Miller, Christine Miller, 
Jennifer Miller, Malhw Mod- 
ica, Anne Mokszycki, Megan 
Moran, Kristina Mulka, De- 
bar Mumenthalcr, Susan Mur- 
phy, Vincent Murray, John 
Muzzupappa, Susan Myers, 
Marco Nasca, Jennifer Nigg, 
Derrick Noble, Paul Noblin, 
Timothy Nucbel, Allison 
Nunamakcr. 

Jeffrey Nutschnig, Erin 
O'Connell, Meghan O'Do- 



herty, John O'Donncll, 
Kristoffcr Oleson, Carrie Ol- 
son, Stcfanic O'Reilly, Jen- 
nifer Orlando, Denisc 
O'Rourkc, Traciann Oslovits, 
Aimcc Ostrandcr, Courtney 
Otto, Michelle Outzcn, Nancy 
Owczarski, Carl Painter, 
Joshua Painter, Kcndra 
Pannhauscn, Ryan Pape, 
Daniel Pastors, Tiffany Pat- 
terson, Mark Pctrailis, Erin 
Porter, Patrick Potempa, Ali- 
son Pratt, Julie -Racppel, Car- 
olyn Regan, Peter Rcnkens, 
Roy Rictz, Rafael Rivera, 
Kristic Rizzio. 

Rebecca Rockstroh, Can- 
dida Rodriguez, Christine Ro- 
jano, Golic Roshandcl, 
Robert Rosing, Emily Rowc, 
Lori Rowe, Lorie Rowe, 
Thomas Rychlik, Ann Sal- 
adino, Curtis Salata, Robert 
Salazar, Brian Scardina, Lisa 
Schultz, Jeffrey Schutz, Jea- 
nine Scott, Kirk Scllke, Bcat- 
riz Sclz, Brian Seveska, Sid 
Sharma, Kevin Sharp, Laura 
Skarzynski, Tracy Sluga, 
Christina Smiley, Alison 
Smith, Elizabeth Smith, Ali- 



cia Soffietti, Heather 
Spindler, Michael Spohr, 
Michael Stack, Elizabeth 
Stanley. 

Mark Steffenburg. Jill 
Stcinbacb, Jill Stiava, Robin 
Sticha, Christy Stoecker, 
Sheldon Stolarik, Deanna 
Stralis, Joan Stratman, 
Katbcrine Streichcr, Laura 
Sturgeon, Tracy Sullivan, 
Stephanie Sutton, Jamil 
Swift, Andrew Szyjka, 
Stephen Szymanowski, David 
Tewksbury, Keith Thompson, 
Robert Tinkham, Carin Tolli, 
James Tschanz. 

Ricky Vercnski, Philan 
Villarrcal, Ashley Vollmcr, 
Michelc Wacura, Aaron Wag- 
ner, Eric Walkanoff, Robert 
Walker, Emmctt Ward, Jaime 
Wegener, Juliana Welling, 
Dcidre White, Nicole White, 
Carl Wiggins, Bradford 
Wilks, Jcrmainc Williams, 
Timothy Williams, Amy Wil- 
son, Krislophcr Wodzinski, 
Alisa Yingling, Elizabeth 
Yusi, Kevin Zomchck, David 
Zorzy, Dustin Zubcrt, and 
Steven Zuikcr. 






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CONGRATULATIOIVS GRADUATES! 

Wc have lots of graduation ideas 
including licliuni balloons! 

Talking Tees 

305 Rollins Rd. 

(AcroBB from Taco Bell) 

Round Lake Beach 

(708) 546-8855 




Best Wishes for a Successful Future! 

special Congratulations to Warren Higli School Graduates 



>^ [OFOUR graduates] ^^ 



BURGER 

KING 



5300 Grand Ave. 
Gurnee, IL 60031 

(708) 336-3427 



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415 S. Buesching Rd. 

Lake Zurich 

(708) 540-8871 

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Congratulations Graduates! 
Great Lakes Credit Union 

2525 Green Bay Road 
North Chicago, IL 

(708) 578-7000 

Hai^e a happy & 
bright future! 




^ 



vm 



J5>|t^{^ products, inc. 



201 Park Avenue 
Lake Villa, IL 60046 

(708) 356-2323 



2B Lakeland Newspapers 

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fill Suburban 

LIMOUSINE SERVICE INC. 

1415 Cedar Lake Rd.. Suite 105. Round Lake Beach, iL 60073 





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.« 



,F;lday,Juno4, 1993 



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■-* l-,s/ *V;4;«'* i*?^*^ * ^^i ''>?.^?-? ^"r El' .t I 




Round Lake High School 



Round Lake High 
School has named the can- 
didates for the graduating 
class of 1993: 

Benjamin Adams, Heather 
Adams, Annette Adamski, 
Tara Adler, Norma Aguirrc, 
Saul AlaoiB, Kimberly Al- 
banese, Christopher Allen, 
Amy Alsperger, John Ander- 
son, m, Pedro Arteaga, James 
Ashworth, Jennifer Avalos, 
Rizicro Avclar, Rosalio Ay- 
ala, Angela Badzioch.Gary 
Bailey, Richard Banulis, 
Mark Bebenna, Paula Be- 
nesch, Clifton Benz, Freder- 
ick Bergman, Jr., Christina 
Biedzinski,^Doria Blanton, 
John Block, Christopher 
Blood. 

Mandy Blood, Laurie 
Bourque, Brian Brennan, Am- 
ber Brinegar, Lorraine 
Brooks, Shawn Bubloni, 
Benjamin Buchanan, Dana 
Burdick, Daniel Burke, Carey 
Butler, Silvia Campos, 
Michael Cardwell, Leticia 
Carlos, Jennifer Carlson, 
Javier Carranza, David Car- 
rilto, Maribel Carrillo, Fran- 
cie Casarez, Sean Casey, 
Nancy Casillas, Daniel 
Chapctta, Jacquclyn 
Chlopek, Jorge Contreras, 
John Cooper, Javier Cor- 
dova, Lillic Crawford. 

Victoria Davis, Robert 
Devenport, III, Beverly 
Dezell, EricDunn, Arturo Du- 
ran, Leonel Trujillo, Theresa 
Eden, Eddie Eidson, Gloria 
Elitzer, Scott Ellenwood, Os- 
valdo Escatcl, Lucy Espinosa, 
Thomas Evans, Tiffany Evert, 
Jody Farmer, James Fcnster- 
maker, Jessica Fairell, Dawn 
Fester, Johnny Fielder, 
Stephen Filip, Ryan Finley, 
Erika Fomander, Jared Fors- 
bcrg, Margaret Frantz, Jerry 
Frencb.II, Melissa French. 

. Joanna Freund, Maria 
Frontzak, Jennifer Frost, 
Jennifer Furner, Karime Ro- 
driguez, Tammy George, 
Melissa Gerharz, Harry Gib- 
son, Erin Giegoldt, April 
Gilbert, Jonathan Gillespie, 
Brian Gomez, Steven Gonka, 
Jr.. Evangelina Gonzalez, 
Leobardo Gonzalez, San- 
juanita Gonzalez, Harold 
Gross, Kellie Gruner, Patrick 
Graanka, Jr., Fedcrtco 
Guardado, Katy Hain, Tasha 
Hancock, Ryan Harris, Timo- 
thy Heath, Holly Hender- 
sbott, Juanita Hernandez. 

Danielle Hill, John Holy- 
cross, Steven Horn, Sarah 



Hosley, Tonya Howen, Laura 
Hrytsay, David Humphrey, 
Jr., John Japczyk, IV, Peter 
Jarvis, Louis Jens, John Jew- 
ell, Amanda Jezioro, 
Christopher Jocbaniewicz, 
Melody Johnson, John 
Jones, Robert Juenger, Bar- 
bara Kaczmaryn, Jason 
Kaminski, Lisa Kennedy, 
Jennifer Kestler, Joy King, 
Sabrina Kisala, Michele 
Kochan. 

Justin Koski, Michelle 
Krause, Julie LaBonte, Adam 
Ladewig, Chad Lafferty, Rus- 
sell LaNier, Mary Lannan, 
Katie Lannon, Jennifer 
Lazarski, Mitchell 

Levandowski, Richard Lin- 
strom, Maria Lira, Vincent 
Lira-Ramon, Roselia Lopez, 
Ralph Loveless, Natalie Lu- 
cas, Christopher Lund, Ian 
Lund, Daniela Mada, Konrad 
Madeja, John Maio, Jayme 
Martin, John Martinez, Pa- 
tience Maston, Louann 
Matthews. 

Holly McClain, Sean Mc- 
Curdy, Julie McDonough, 
Brian McGinley, Sean Mc- 
Govern, Janice McGuire, Ja- 
son McGuire, Enrique Flores, 
Jennifer Mennes, Victoria 
Message, Dan Meyer, Joseph 
Meyer, David Mikols, Bren- 
nan Miller, Delbert Miller, 
Jr., Gregory Milner, Susan 
Miracle, Monica Miszewski, 
Marianne Mitterling, Tracy 
Mogan, Colette Moore, Laura 
Morales, Jason Mount, 
Richard Muellemann. 

Jennifer Neuls, Amanda 
NichoUs, Michael Niemczyk, 
Thomas Noda, Russell Nof- 
singer, Renee Paulette 
Nordling, Danielle Obrochta, 
Jeremiah O'Farrell, Kari 
Olsen, Chad Olson, Randy 
Olson, Susan Olson, Sbana 
Pando, Brandon Patrick, 
Christopher Patton, Isaac 

Paulson, Deanna Peachcy, 
Christina Pederscn, Angela 
Perna, Erik Peterson, Ann 
Marie Philyaw, Abraham 
Pocasangre, Sbannen Pope, 
Rick Porter, Keith Portzen, 
Erin Powers. 

Wilbur Powers, Anthony 
Pranschke, Richard Price, 
Stuart Primack, Agnes 
Pstragwoski, Jose Quiroz, 
Karen Rainer, Kimberly 
Rainer, Heather Randolph, 
Gregory Rawlings, Megan 
Reilly, Brian Rheberg, An- 
gela Rinaldi, Cynthia Rivera, 
Timothy Roberts, Rico 
Robertson, Candy Robin, 



Congratulations 
Class of '93 

City of North Chicago 

- Mayor - 

Bobby E. Thompson 

& The City Council 



V 



-;^ -City Clerk - 

^' Catherine Collins 

- City Treasurer - 

Dan Pacenti 







Christi Robin, Clint Ro- 
driguez, Irene Rodriguez, 
Sandra Rodriguez, Beth 
Rosinski, Heimila Ruiz, Ser- 
gio Ruiz. - . 
Julie Russo, Terry Ruther- 
ford, Joanna Ruttle, John 
Salemi, Jr., Anabel Salinas, 
Gerardo Sancen, Kristie 
Scharfhausen, Tiffany 
Schotanus, Jeremy Schwenn, 
Michael Seversen," Jennifer 
Shaban, Janell Sbak, 
Christopher Sbanor, Steven 
Siggeman, Steven Skurka, 
Jenifer Sliger, Aaron Smith, 
Evelyn Smith, Jonathan Sny- 
der, Kairie Sobotta, Eddie 
Soderberg, Angela Spaulding, 
Jennifer Spohn, Carey Stagg. 
Jennifer Staral, Dawn 
Stephens, Denise Stephens, 
Carrie Stock, Cathleen 
Stockwell, Marcin Szajner, 
Katberine Szymanski, 
Fredrick Talbot, Luke Tesch, 
Mary Theisen, David 
Thomas, Mike Thompson, 
Eric Thorson, Joseph 
Thorsteins, Bobby Tolson, 
Jimmy Tong, Tommy Tong, 
Francisco Tones, Pedro Vor- 
res, Jr., Debbie Trayes, 
Donna Trayes, Lisa Troy, 
Martin Valadez, Brian Van- 
denboom, Rattana Vannaraj, 
Lori Videlka. 

Kelly Walker, Jennifer 
Wallace, Michael Walsh Jr., 
William Wasson, Elizabeth 
Weaver, Amy Welzen, Toni ' 
Wclzen, Steven Wildkatsch, 
April Wilken, Christopher 
Wilson, Melissa Witt, 
Matthew Wojtach, Robert 
Woodworth, Mike Wozniak, 
Aubrey Wuchter, Aaron 
Yazzie, Ayxba Yessa, 
Christopher Young, Eliza- 
beth Zabroski, Heather Za- 
lesky, Miguel Zarinana, 
Justin Zdeb, Scott Zientara, 
Thomas Zigmund, James Zu- 
rawski. 




Night to remember 

Shawn Asta and Mary Thersen dance the night away at Round Lake High 
School prom.— Photo by Jim Schwarz 



Mundeieln High School 




Mundelein High Scbooi 
has named the candidates for 
the graduating class of 

1993: 

Jeaneth Acosta, Jennine 
Adamek, Jonathan Adams, 
Ronald Akers, Ma Rosario 
Almanza, Andrew Baade, Ian 
William Baaske, Adam 
Becker, Robert Becker. Stacy 
Beese, Christopher Beetham, 
Robert Beyer, Teresa Biagi, 
Steven Boeck, Eric Bowman, 
Darren Brightwell, Quinn 
Brooks, Eric Browne, 
Matthew Brua, John Bunge, 
Jr., Joyce Burkempcr, Ryan 
Burkemper, Anthony Burns, 
Brian Bunzinski, Rebecca 
Butler, John Calderaro, Jr., 
Tom Calvin, Dominga Car- 
dona, Sean Carrigan, Jose 
Castillon, Phillip Christie, 
Conni Ciffone, Dylan Clark, 
Christy Connell,- Cynthia 
Culley, Karl Danek, Matt 
Davies, Jennifer Davignon, 
Robert Davis. 

Joy Dean, Amy DeBaets, 
John Dickson, Kari Disch, 
Roberto Dominguez, 
Mitchell Dunn, Diana Duran, 
Kelly Ekvall. Idalia Elizaldc, 
Michelle Erickson, Gwen- 
dolyn Faus, Suzanne Feircria, 
Amber Flavin, Kathleen Fo- 
ley, Joseph Fornero, Joseph 
Price, Jennifer Ftacek, Steven 
Fuller, Amanda Gadziak. 



Steven Garrett^ Jason Gales, 
Lilly Gerhard, Jennine 
Goodart, Christine Gottstein, 
Raymond Gradecki, Lacey 
Guenthcr, Walter Guevara, 
Mary Amy Gustafson, Susana 
Gutierrez, Matthew Hajzl, 
Gregory Hamilton, Sara 
Hamm, Jeffrey Hanks, Dorrie 
Happ, Doris Hairah, Kaelyn 
Harrington, David Hartmann, 
Carrie Haug, Kelly Hayes, Ju- 
lia Herbert. 

Maurilio Hernandez, Nora 
Nancy Hernandez," Oscar Her- 
nandez, Kristin Hernquist, 
Paul Ct Hight, H, Steven 
Holen, Paul Jackson, 
Shawnda Jackson, Lana Ja- 
cobsma, Amy Jessup, Ben- 
jamin Johnson, Jason John- 
son, Laura Johnson, Mclanie 
Johnson, Alisa Kapchinski, 
Jeremiah Kane, Sandra Ker- 
ber, Christopher Klein, Dave 
Klewer, Bonnie Klos, Kelli 
Knox, Eric Konke, Chandra 
Kotty, Hillary Kravitz, Jason 
Kuffer, Dana Kujala, Michael 
Kusevskis, Jason Kuss, Troy 
LaRosc, Shannon Lawrence, 
Carolyn Lindblom, Charlie 
Lockhart, William Logan, 
Jamison Loizcaux, Chenda 
Lort, Patricia Lutka. Colin 
Marsh, Kristin Martin, 
Amanda Marx. 

Mark Mateja, Thomas 
Mathews, Spiridoula 



Mavrothalasitis, Joanna 
Maza, Alberto Mendoza, 
Christy Miller, Joshua 
Miller, Patrick Miller, Kevin 
Mirock, Heather Moore, 
Michael Morala, Danilo 
Morales, Laura Morita, M. 
Michael Munoz, Troy Napier, 
Ryan Nobile, Willie Norman, 
Kelly O'Connor, Joana Old- 
enburg, Maria Ortiz, Patrick 
Page, Aaron Parduhn, Jung- 
bin Park, Brett FeasoD, 
Tamara Pearson, Brenda Pc- 
leska, Jessica Perdomo, 
Heather Permann, Jeanette 
Pesnikov, Heather Peters, 
Victoria Picchietti, Daivd 
Poterek, Dennis Presburg, 
Victoria Pu'scb, John Quam- 
strom, Leo Quinn, Joshua 
Ravenscraft, Sean Reeves, 
Robert Reichel. Wendy 
Reyes. 

Daniel Reynolds, Toiquk- 
waun Rivers, Amy Roche, 
Christopher Rogers, Paul 
Rogers, Jamie Ross. Jennifer 
Ross. Justin Rundall, 
RobertRush, Michelle Rych. 
Cara Sabo, Joshua Sacchcittl, 
Martha Salazar, Noemi 
Salazar, Natalie Santoste- 
fano, Nicole Sarsok, Ar- 
mando Saucedo, William 
Sawitz, Tanya Schild, Tracy 
Schockmel, Stacy Scholz, 
Andrew Schroeder, Sheri 

(Continued on page 4B) 



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Friday, June 4, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 3B 






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(Continued from page 3B) 

Sekenske, Jason Shepard, 
Brendan Sbicis, Diane Sidari, 
Cayce Siegel, Jonathan 

Smith, Pcnnie Smith, Jen- 
nifer SncI!, Brian Sobanski, 
Heather Sonneland, Elizabctli 

Spain, Terilyn Starkcy, 
Randy Stilke, Darccy Striner, 
James Stromberg, Rebecca 
Strub, Cassandra Struggles, 



JoAnn Swanson. 

• Sherry Tatosian, David 
Tekampc, Sonja Tesnow, 
Monica Traynor, Colette 
Trepanier, Mary Bety 
VanZceland, Monica Vargas, 
Ronn Vamey, Alison Vocll, 
Shawn Voyles, Steven Wag- 
ner, Scott Wahlert, Paulette 
Waibel, Ky Walker, Rebecca 
Walker, Rencc Walker, 
William Walters, Gary Wal- 



ton, Jonathan Wasik, Tani 
Wasniewski, Stacy Weathers, 
Benjamin Webber, Kristin 
Wcide, Jennifer Weimcr, 
Zachary Wcinstein, Tricia 
Welle, Samantha Wells, 
Christopher Wetteland, Kim- 
berly Wilson, Kimberly 
Winandy. Shawn Worwa, 
Kristin Yoo, Denise Yurek, 
Gregory Zaun, Jennifer 
Zudonyl, Gina Zurawski. 



Grayslake Community High School 



Grayslakes Community 
High School has named the 
following candidates for the 
graduating class of 1993: 

Ubaldo Aguirrc, Cragi Al- 
fred, Alissa Amodco, Christy 
Anderson, Brian Andrews, 
Claudia Archila, Gene Bacsa, 
HI, Daniel Barnes, Juilc Bart- 
nick, Michael Becker, 
Danielle Bcshel, Brandy 
Beyer, Nicole Bonfanti, Jon 
Brown, Jennifer Buchler, 
Matt Bybec, Brent By water, 
Marni Caldwell, Robert 
Commuso, Tabitha Covelli, 
Stephanie Cox, Matthew 
CuUen, Todd Daniels, Teresa 
Daujotis, Danielle Degroot, 
Christina Denny, Kris Do- 
herty, Kelley Donovan, 
James Doyle, Todd Doyle, 
Christopher Duszak, Dawn 
Earnest, George Emcrich, 
Todd Faurbo, Liannc Pciertag, 
Stephanie Fiore, Michelle 
Fischer, Jerry Fish, PaUrick 
Fitzgerald, Jcasica Flary, 
Amy Fort, Neal Fritz, Jeff 
Gammel, Mark Garbcrding, 
Rosa Garcia, Toni Maire 
Gates, Stephen George, 
Demetra Giannakakis, An- 
thony Gliot, Jessica Goss. 

Kcnnis Graham, Laura 
Grascr, Amy Grccnwald, Rich 
Grote, Dane Gryb, William 
Gucnthcr, Aimee Gueroult, 



Jeremy Guilbcrt, Bryan 
Gutraj, JcanctteHalle, 
Stephanie Hardy, William 
Harrigan, Jason Hart, Jason 
Heincmann, Laurie Holmacc, 
Vikki Hcrtel, Daniel Hogan, 
Virginia Hughes, Jeff Insel- 
bergcr, Justin Johnson, Ja- 
cob Judd.Grcgory Kane, Russ 
Katzcnmaicr, Michael 
Kearby, Sarah Kerns, Ken- 
neth Klabundc, Susan Klepel, 
Paul Koptcrski, Dwaync 
(Butch) Kyle, Charmaine 
Lahman, Tami Larson, Nicole 
Leak, Donald Lcider, Ben Lid- 
dlc, Christi Lindh, Jodi Long, 
Trina Madole, Christopher 
Madsen, Christopher 
Magiera, Melayna Martinez, 
Roland Martinez, Heather 
Mason, Jennifer Mason, 
Shannon Mason, Brian 
Masscy, Glenn McGary, 
David Mcintosh, Rauley Me- 
Icndez, Robert Mennes, Jr., 
Rcnee Meyer, Tracy Michehl. 

Margaret Midcr, Colleen 
Miller, Cynthia Miller, 
James Miller, Gina Miskanis, 
Jay Moore, Jerry Moore, Ivan 
Moy, David Moynihan, Lin- 
nae Nannemann, Donald 
Neis, in, Toni Ncmeth, Brian 
Neuman, Hahnh Nguyen, 
Adam Nicderkohr, Michelle 
Nordling, Con O'DonncIl, 
Nathan Oberdier, Alejandro 



Ortigosa, Bella Bayas, Rami 
Pak, Isaac Paulson, Andrea 
Pcncak, Pvt. Eric S. Perham, 
Rebekah Phelps, Christina 
Phillips, Joseph Pineda, Ja- 
son Powell, Mike Rezmer, 
Elizabeth Rix, Nadine 
Roberts, Benjamin Rockwell, 
Eric Rubin, Greg Rybarczyk, 
Tammy Sagel, Danielle 
Scarpclli, William Scheske, 
Steve Schultz, Scott Schupp, 
Kevin Schwinn, Tracie Selby. 
Kerri Shanahan, David Shaw, 
Laurie Sherman, William 
Siggeman, Kelly Sindt, 
Melissa Smith.Sadie Smith, 
Jane Souder, Zachary 
Spencer, Karen Stack, Lynn 
Stanley, Jason Starzec, Jen- 
nifer Stefinsky. 

Aaron Strain, Virginia 
Strom, Julie Tamraz, Jeffrey 
Taylor, Steven Taylor, Lisa 
Tessmann, Maria Trevino, 
Dawn Veckey, Cynthia 
Verenski, Patricia Villasenor, 
- Kevin Vlies, Amanda Vogcl, 
Allison Waldenstrom, Luke 
Walkington, William 
Walther, Jr., Sara Weeks, 
Gerry Weidman, Russell 
Welch, Bryan White, Erika 
Wicnke, Rocbert Witt, Jen- 
nifer Wilt, Deonn Wolfe, 
John Wolfe, Tyneal Worchcl, 
Corinne Wysocki, Jacob 
Yukna, and PaUrick Zorb. 



Class of 1993 









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Reflecting 



Allison Waldenstrom, left, class salutatorian at Grayslake Community High 
School and valedictorian Gina Miskanis discuss their speeches as com- 
mencement ceremony begins. High schools throughout Lake County are 
holding graduation ceremonies this weekend. — Photo by Steve Peterson. 



Wauconda High School 



Wauconda High School 
has named the candidates for 
the graduating class of 
1993: 

Kayla Alcock, Ernest Ale- 
jandro, William Allen, Don- 
ald Alsafi, Aimee Austin, 
Sean Balke, David Barreiro, 
Brandy Bartnick, Marnie 
Basta, Nuria Benito, G. 
Leonard Bennett, m, Rachel 
Bcrthiaume, Krystinc Bird, 
Jennifer Bishop, Wendy 
Bledsoe, David Bowen, 
Nathan Bowers, Christy 



Bradcn, Randy Brill, Bradley 
Brown, Juile Burger, Roxana 
Carcaga, Brett Christiansen, 
Erick Ciske, Nicole Ciske, 
Kathcrine Clark, Karol Coats. 
Oralia Contreras, Jcaninc 
Costa, Rebecca Blokland, 
Darla DcSort, Jennifer Dcddo, 
Angela DcSecki, Robert Di- 
nardo, Christina Egert, Jason 
Ernst, Scott Evol, Sean Faul, 
Kenneth Fidler, Brian Fife, 
Jodi Frank, Abraham 
Frontzak, Kira Gates, Lori 
Giaccbetli, Vanessa Grabow, 
Jason Graves, David Gross, 



Sandra Harris, Sharon Heck, 
Forin Hernandez, Sarina Her- 
nandez, Anthony Hincs, Su- 
san Hoffmann, Tiffany Hon- 
cycutt, James Hughes. 

Marie Ingram, Kathleen 
Jett, Bryon Johnson, 
Christopher Kanzler, Daniel 
Kasfaeimer, Jennifer Kirk, 
Wilhclm Koencmann, 
Christopher Krofel, Brian 
Kurban, Brian Kuzniar. 
Julieanna Genevieve Beth 
Lambert, Angela Langcr, An- 

(Contlnucd on page 58} 






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Congratulations 1993 Grads! 

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(708) 587-8011 




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Congratulations to all 1993 | 
Graduates and the 
Best of Luck to you all 

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Congratulations & "Best "Wishes ^ 
. ^ . to the. Ctass cfl993> ', \ ^i 

j^rprnMofZLsAtyi . .^| 

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Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



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(Continued from page 4B) 

gela LaPointe, Ronald Lasb- 
eff, Louise Lindner, Dustin 
LoScbiavo, Dominique Lutz, 
Anthony Lynn, Donna Mar- 
torano, Jeffrey -Matkovich, 
Dawn Maher, Theresa Mayo, 
Christopher Merkner, 
Rachcle Milinki, Melissa 
Miller, Kelly Morgan, Kora 
Muligano. 

Kerry Mulso, Maria 
Munoz, Lottie Murphy, Roy 
Murphy, David Musser, Tara 
Nelson, Rebecca Neumann, 
Lisa Norris, Brian Now, 
Jcromy Orestano, Tina Pesz, 
Heidi Pcszat, Meredith Petcr- 
.son, Kari Pictrusiewicz, 
Catherine Polnau, Michelle 
Pressney, Terry Pridemore, 
Amy Rapier, Angela Redman, 
Daniel Ritchie, Heather 
Roesler, Mariano Rosado, 



Carrie Sabourin, Phil Sanew, 
Bradley Savage, Amy Schar- 
lau, Adam Schicht, Grant 
Schmidt. 

Benjamin Seelye, III, 
Kelly Seitz, Kathryn Silver, 
Christina Smela, Jennifer 
Smith, Phillip Smith, April 
Solimine, James Solomon, 
Jr., Tara Sullivan, Dawn 
Swanson, Jeremy Syrocki, 
Heather Taitel, Garrett Ter- 
shel, Melissa Thompson, 
Rachel Torres, Julie Tuegel, 
Tim Tuegel, Alicca Nicole 
Vombrack, Steven Waldo, 
Geoff Walters, Stephanie 
Wallers, William Walters, 
Steven Wanshck, Natalie 
Ward, Valerie Welton, Mamie 
Whitlock, Jennifer Wilbur, 
Paul Wilkins, Amy Winther, 
Kristen Wisniewski, Nick 
Wright. 




Jazz it up 



Grant Community High School 



Grant Commiinity High 
School has named candi- 
dates for the graduating 
class of 1993: 

Jeannie Aitken, Ocnna 
Anderson, Nelson Anderson, 
Thomas Anderson, April 
Austin, Jason Baker, Mar- 
garet Balicki, Kenneth 
Barkulis, Debra Barnes, 
Robin Becmer, Julie Boeger, 
John BoUam, Brian Boyd, 
Katrina Brandt, Shannon 
Browning, John Burgess, 
Jody Burr, Rachel Carpenter, 
Denise Cecbini, Christina 
Cblopek, Kenneth Clark, 
Michelle Clark, Nick Con- 
giusti, Michael Cooper, 
Heather Cox, Jessica 
Crutchcr, Timothy Culotta, 
Nicholas Cwikla, Jodeen 
Dahl. Lisa Deiblcr, Jaime 
Delgado, JoAnn Desiniotes. 

Danielle Dietrich, 
Michelle Dunne, Laura 
Edgell, Nicole Erickson, Re- 
nee Fenrich, Ryan Filip, 



Soctt Finch, Regena Florisi, 
Elizabeth Fries, Sara Fuller, 
Trecia FuUerton, Jose 
Galarza, Roberto Garcia, Sun- 
shine Garcia, Amber Gath- 
man, RobertGerstncr, Lisa 
Glashagcl, William Gloff. 
Brandy Graves, Thomas 
Graziano, Kimberly Griffin, 
Rickey Griffin, Nathan 
Guisinger, Heather Hattmann, 
Cherish Henncssy, Ken Her- 
ring. 

Jodi Hocbnc, Kristena 
Hochne, Timothy Hopper, 
Russ Huffmaster, Kelly Innis, 
Michelle Johnson, Ricky 
Justus, Katherine Kendall, 
Tberesc King, Erin Klein, 
Adela Klowas, Kenneth 
Knapp, Cher Kolb, Cindy 
Konen, Robert Korycanck, 
Jeffery Krasinski, Deborah 
Krol, Guy Kruegcr, Jason 
Kundc, Julie LcMay, Edart 
Lenzc, Jennifer Leschcr, 
Faiih Lever, Amanda Lewis, 
Tadd Lindcrman, David Lipin- 



ski, Jason Lord, Kcrin 
Lorence, Kathryn Lynch, 
Tama Margowski. 

Kimberly Martin, Anton 
Maucb, Bcrnice Mauch, Laura 
Mayenschein, Sommer Maze, 
Dacques McCann, Ruth Mc- 
Coy, EUen McDcimitt, James 
McKinncy, III, Brian Mc- 
Nally, Robert Medine, 
Melissa Militano, Todd 
Miller, Michelle Moore, 
Timothy Mott, Victoria Nel- 
son, Michelc Nieves, Shan- 
non Noble, Louis Notriano, 
Carol Novak, Keith Nukkala, 
Gerald Nyden, Jr., Amy Or- 
nelas, Patricia Owens, Alan 
Pctrovic, Angel Pineda, Carol 
Pugesck, Vanessa Raasch. 

Kent Rejholcc, Rosalinda 
Reyes, Stepban Richford, 
Tina Robbs, Benjamin 
Robinson, Christine Rowan, 
David Rowc, Jeffrey Russ, 
Amanda Ryan, Keith Ryen, 
John Sancen, Lisa Scbar, 
Ryan Schilli, Jascn Scbine, 



The Grant High School pom pons perform at the school's annual Jazz 
Concert. Pom Pons performed to "Favorite Son" from the musical "Will 
Rogers Follies." Below, Chris Mansfield is on trumpet. — Photos by Bill Carey 




-.W' 



Justin Schoeffel, Mark 
Schultz, Amber Severs, 
Patrick Smerz, Meredith 
Smith, Jayson Sovsky, Jamie 
Spadaro, Nicholas Spadairo, 
Erich Spoonhour, Rebecca 



Stewart, Casey Strom;' Mered- 
ith Stynoski. 

Larry Sucbowski, Candice 
Sullivan, Brian Thomason, 
Dana Urban, Heidi VonAU- 
men, Aaron Vonbrucnchen- 



bein, Michael Ward, Tracy 
Wedrall, Brian Williamson, 
Kevin Wincbell, Michael 
Winscom, Cathy Woodbury, 
Melinda Wrzesinski, Jody 
York, Jennifer Zemba. 




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RETAIL & WHOLESALE 

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Congrats Sequoitsi 



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CREDIT 

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Watch for our Branch Location 
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(708) 395-7808 





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244-7684 




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Congratualtions Todd ^oyle! 

Silk-N-Haz Bridal Salon 

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Mon. &Thurs. 12-7 
Tues. &Fri. 12-5 
3!4 Sat. 1 1-3 Closed Wed. & Sun. 

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Antioch, Illinois 

(708) 395-3600 

Congratutatiom To ^Ifie Class Of '93 

Graduate You Are Already Pre-Approved 
For A New Car 



Friday. June 4, 1993 



Lakeland Newtpapera SB 






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Warren Township High School 



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Following are Warren 
Twp, High School candi- 
dates for the graduation 
class of 1993: 

Yusuf Afcyol, Jason 
Alexander, Rebecca Alger, 
Colin Ashley (Valedictorian), 
Corey Bagin, Rebecca Baker, 
Erika Banick, Cheryl Barker, 
Christopher Baugher, David 
Bay less, Brian Becker, Jes- 
sica Below, Daniel Bcnz, 
Michelle Bergeron, Eduardo 
Berlanga, Elisabeth Binford, 
Julie Bishop, Beth 
Blockinger, Lisa Bochenek. 
Deborah Botimcr, Danielle 
Bouvat, Holly Ann Bowker, 
Miranda Bowman, Sandra 
Boysen, Robert Brant. 

Tiffany Bunting, Mary 
Kay Bush, Colleen Butler, 
Lisa Canino, Annabclle Can- 
las, Loralcc Case, Candace 
Castellanos, Anthony 
Cecola, Daniel Cerda, Sharon 
Charctte, Kimberly Chessare, 
Felix Cheung, Kristcn 
Chimino, Anita Choudhury, 
John Chrapkowski, Joseph 
Christina, Jill Chumbley, 
Laura Clement, Paul Colclla, 
Shelley Cook, Kathcryn Ra- 
♦ monc Coopridcr, Melanie 
Elizabeth Corn 

(Salutatorian), MeUnda Marie 
Craig, David Dahm, Kevin 
Daly, . Jeff Dangel, Daniel 
Davis, Surctha Davis, Re- 
becca DcGraaf, James DeJe- 
sus. 

Tara Marie Dellwo, Lynne 
DeMcycr, Megan Derlelh, 
Cindi Don, Rachel Drake, 
Jennifer Drennen, Nora 
Drews, Mikkcl Dubensky, 
Wesley Dumalski, Joseph 
Edwards, Steven Egli, Mar- 
lene Elfcring, Jim Enstrom, 
Valeric Eppcrs, Mary Beth 
Fangcr, Anders Farr, Ethel 
Fernandez, Jamie Fields, 
Kristin Fiscbel, Benjamin 
Flaschncr, Michelle Foumier, 



Matthew Fout, Cynthia 
Freese, Jennifer Fry, Lolita 
Fung, Bradley Gaidar, Darren 
Gardner, Cristy Gawron, 
Shaun Gcbbardt, Paul Genda. 

Kathryn Geroulis, Kristin 
Gewalt, Nikolaos Gian- 
nakakis, Lori Gildea, John 
Gipson, Jennifer Golwitzcr, 
Michael Gonzalez, Paul 
Gooding, Denver Grayson, 
Steven Greer, Erik Grenier, 
John Grom, Korey Grubb, 
Karen Gustafson, Thomas 
Gutknecht, Matthew Haapa- 
nen. Heather Hagen, Danielle 
Hale, Christy Halley, Justin 
Hanlin, Daniel Hanson, Eric 
Hanson, John Haramis, Cyn- 
this Harrigan, Taryn Hart- 
man, Philip Hatfield, Mark 
Haubricb, Karen Hauser, 
Owen Hayes, Stephen Hegel. 

Keith Henrickson, Gre- 
gory Hcrlihy, Justin Herman- 
son, Donato Hernandez, 
Stephanie Hcrner, Jennifer 
Heskett, Steven Hill, Joe 
Hird, Zita Holeczy, Jcffery 
Hood, Shawna Hoover, 
Charles Hopper, Kimberly 
Horlon, Keith Hubert, Robert 
Idstein, Reynaldo Iglesia, m, 
Nicole Jackman, Floyd Jack- 
son, m, Michael Jaworski, 
Danielle Jenkins, Amy John- 
son, Hugh Johnson, Slade 
Johnson, Christina Kable, 
Brian Kalbfleisch, Traci 
Kalfut, Joshua Kegg, Maria 
Kendrick, Forest Key, Patrick 
Kile. 

Yong Kim, Sherry Kim, 
David Komperda, Tanja Kop- 
per, Kristin Kovacek, Ray- 
mond Koziol, Peter Ko- 
zlowski, Joseph Krakovsky, 
Cbasiti Kruckow, Jerry Kr- 
uschwitz, Erika Ladwig, 
Christopher Lambert, Bryan 
Langley, Janee Lansitie, Ron 
Larsen, Ayesu Lartey, Jen- 
nifer Lawlcr, Ann Marie 
Leckman, Becky Lee, Mark 



Lcginski, Brandon Lemonicr, 
Jana Lcnzi, Michelle Lesch, 
Peter Lester, Kevin Lewis, 
Jeremy Lila, Michael Lochde, 
Krista Logan, Tiffany Long. 

Orlando Lopez, Amber 
Luczak, Jennifer Lundquist, 
Melissa Lundquist, Timothy 
Lynch, Stephen Mack, H, 
Erik Magrini, Dennis Main, 
Crystal Makela, Robert 
Makcla, Kristi Maksimowicz, 
Aislinn Manderino, Alois 
Manges, Jamie Morienau, Ja- 
son Marolt, Michelle Martin, 
Timothy Martin, Rosanna 
Martinez, Alison Matcja, 
Michael Mateja, Ann Marie 
Mathews, Janet Maun, 
Michael Mauritz, Meredith 
May, Traci McAllister, Ryan 
McCormack, Scan McGruder, 
Adam McMahon, Dustin 
Meadows, Jennier Menke. 

Bonnie Merritt, Kathryn 
Metcalf, Laci Metcalf, An- 
jeanette Metreyeon, Scott 
Meyers, Michelle Michaels, 
Christopher Miller, Donald 
Miller, Vincent Minchillo, 
Tara Mitchell, Mark Modde, 
Jonathan Moo, Ericka 
Moore, Thomas Moran, Kelly 
Mudrak, Ismael Munzo, Jr., 
Stephanie Musfelt, Joseph 
Naden, Jennifer Nanda, Chris- 
tine Narbone, Kelly Nerini, 
Sandra Nettnin, Charles 
Newell, Lan Nguyen, Teresa 
Nowikowski, Christy 
O'Dette, Jennifer O'Neill, 
Jennifer Oldham, Robert Ol- 
son, Jenny Orh. 

Tracy Orick, Sharon Or- 
they, Rebecca Osmolak, 
Brian Otka, David Pankros, 
Jennifer Paiham, Sung "Park, 
Sonja Pasko, Catherine Pas- 
sanantc, Pawcl Pasternak, 
James Pcllettiere, Eduardo 
Perez, Ziza Pesic, Lester 
Pesons, Antoinette Peters, 
Melissa Peters, Bradley Pe- 
terson, Erik Peterson, Jeff 



Petrovic, Melody Pierce, 
Matthew Pulaski, Dusan 
Racic, Vesna Racic, Milan 
Rakic, Jose Rangel, Kari 
Rasmusscn, Juana Rattler, 
Matthew Rau, Kimberly 
Raucci, Kathleen Reed. 

Daniel Reich, Alfredo 
Reyes, Andrew Rich, Jeremy 
Roberts, Mindy Roberts. 
Mindy Roberts, Christopher 
Robinson, Sheila Robinson, 
Dana Rodcwald, Matthew 
Roebuck, Brandon Rohranz, 
Nicole Rojas, Christine Ro- 
nan, Cindiann Roscmeyer, 
Sara Rossmann, Andy Ryn- 
earson, Melissa Sable, 
Clarissa Sanders, Christina 
Sapinoso, Christopher Sar- 
gent, Cory Savage, Keith 



Scala, Brandon Schild, Bryan 
Schmidt, Paul Schneider, 
Chad Scott, Brook Sexton, 
Amy Sica, Marc Sicbenbrodt, 
Daniel Simmet. Terra Siwula. 

Chris Skaramagos, Kelly 
Smetana, Linda Smith, Sean 
Smith, Heather Sorensen, 
Christopher Spaulding, 
Kasey Springer, Kevin Stall- 
cup, Laura Stanciu, Robyn 
Stankiewicz, Stephanie 
Stevenson, Amy Stolarik, 
Thomas Streicher, Jr., Terri 
Stried, Cynthia Suda, Michael 
Swiscz, Dana Tapio, Ryan 
Taylor, Carrie Tenncssen, 
Brian Thomas, Pamela 
Thome, Shawn Tilden, 
Michael Tomasello, Niko- 



Ictta Tritsis, Kathleen Tryba^ 
Kimberly Ulricb, Mandi: Ur- 
ban, Andrew Valenticic, 
-Monica Varitek, Matt Wag- 
ner. 

Emma Wallgrcii,' Sa- 
moncWcissman, Jennifer 
Welton, Matthew Werhane, 
Daniel White, WiUiam Wick- 
ert, Christopher Wilkum, 

Charles Williams, HI, Keesha 
Williams, Nikiel Williams, 
Michael WilUts, Cory Wills, 
Timothy Wise, Ui;'Kevin 
Wolfe, Angle Wright, Jen- 
nifer Yu, Christopher- Zager, 
Walah-Pawn Caroline Zahn, 
Jennifer Zechicl, Brp.diey 
Zieger, Nichole Zirbes, John 
Zupec, Tina Zygokostas. 



Lake Zurich High School 



Following is the list of 
Lake Zurich High School 
candidates for the graduating 
class of 1993-. 

Robert Ackcrmann, HI, 
Alicia Anderson, Donald An- 
derson, Steven Anderson, 
Kerri Arendt, Jennifer Arm- 
strong, Brent Arndt, Dylan 
Arnold, ManinderAulakh, 
Brian Barficld, Daniel Baker, 
Jason Baker, Brian Barficld, 
Brent Barnes, Kimberly Bcd- 
narz, Jessica Beelen, Gerard 
Blum, Justin Boston, Timo- 
thy Brehm, Andrea Broullard, 
Cortney Browning, Catherine 
Buschmann. Bradley Bush, 
Kelly Butzen, Kerri Camp- 
bell, Joseph Carbis, Gregg 
Cardin. Dale Carlson, Dou- 
glas Ccfala, Michael 
Chisamore, John Chris- 
tensen, Corie Cook, Dawn 
Cooper. 

Bryan Coumoycr, James 
Cuellar, Joseph Czysczon, 
Alexandra Daniels, Jonathan 
DeFlorio, Annette DcFranco, 
Kellie Dietz, Robert Dittman, 
Mitcsch Dixit, Teresa Doma- 



leczny, Stephanie Dotson, 
Corey Duncan, Bradley 
Eastep, Christopher Eck, 
Gary Eckert, Blair Epstein, 
David Falco, Derek Fanciullo, 
Christopher Fedorowicz, 
Ronald Fister, II, Travis 
Foderaro, Brian Frank, 
Alyssa Frelk, Becky Frey, 
Benjamin Friedcrich, Brian 
Gabriel, Michael Gavigan, 
Christine Gernady, Lisa 
Ghisolf, Daina Gibson, Susan 
Gifford, Jennifer Gilchrist, 
Judd Goldberg, Melissa Gon- 
zalez, Eric Goodman, Robert 
Grisamore, Lauren Guillik- 
son. 

Mark Hammond, Thomas 
Harrington, Dawn Hcideman, 
Teri Heidcnrcich, Meghan 
Heinrich, Jack Henderson, 
Christopher Hendrick, Mark 
Henninger, Griselda Hcrrera, 
Kurt Holzwarth, Angelo 
Hultquist, David Huperich, 
Ajay Jagsi, Kai Jeng, Mark 
Jones, David Keeter, 
Christopher Keller, Kaccy 
Kelly, Tracy Kilian, Scott 
Klein, Kathleen Kloss, 



Michelle Knapp, Matthew 
Knox, Kenneth Kqlman, Rj., 
Martha Kolosa, Jennifer KoU 
ski, Kristin Krasncsky, Jes- 
sica KrawGzykowski, Stacy 
Kienipel, Brian Kretschmer, 
Todd Kuna, Julie Kusmerz, 
Victoria Kyrychenko, Jamie 
Lamp, Jessica Lange, Jeffciy 
Laubach, Patrick Laurie, Jes- 
sica Lebiedz, Steven Lebron, 
Patrick Lecinski, Carlie 
Lemer. 

Sara Lessner, Paul 
Lcwsader, David Lexau, Erika 
Linder, Sarah Lion, Anthony 
Loizzi, Gregory Long, Keith 
Lyles, Kevin Lyles, Joseph 
Lynch, Jarred Maddox, Kurt 
Magle, Lance Marrano, 
Bradley Marshall, ScanMath- 
eson. Mark McCatlum, 
Steven McWherter, Julie 
Merchant, Joseph Mergen- 
thaler, Tiffany Mcrgenthaler, 
Jennifer Mirocha, Zane Mon- 
ahan, Rebecca Muger- 
ditchian, Clifford Nellis, Erik 
Nelson, Richard Norman, 
Heather O'Donnell, Samuel 
(Continued on page 7B) 





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(Continued from page 6B) 
Ob, Robert Olthouse, Deanna 
Palucci, April Pederson, Sean 
Penrod, Nicole Perryman, 
Victoria Pfammatter, 
Kimberly Polcyn, Victor Po- 
ntes, Kimbra Postlewalte, 
Susan Poterek, Elizabeth 
Powell, Kristi Powell, 

Shell Ptak, Jamie 
Quigley, Kelly Rabmanian, 
Kimberly Anne Rardin, Jef- 



frey Reich, Celcstina Reyes, 
Jeana Ribdrdy, Suzanne 
Richtfort, Kendra Richwine, 
Melody Rivera, Bryan Roach, 
Stephanie Roberts, Geil 
Rocbford, Ryan Russell, 
Scott Rybarczyk, Samantha 
Nicole Safranek, Daniel 
Christopher Salman, 
Matthew Sato, Jonathan 
Scbaudt, Donald Schlicker, 
Bryon Schneider, Joanna 



Schneider, Brett Schreibcr, 
Aaryn Schultz, Tiffany 
Scbultz, Heather Scbulz, Amy 
Schwartz/ Joshua Schwede, 
Michelle Selzer, James 
Seneker, Todd Shaffer, Mona 
Shah, Nicole Spada, Gabriel 
Steffens, Lance Stengel, Enn 
Stumpp, Joseph Svehla, 
Christy Symonds, Ben 
Szczepaniak. 

Vivek, Talwar, Nicholas 



AdlarE. Stevenson High School 



Adiai Stevenson High 

School has named the fol- 

i^ lowing candidates for the 

'^ graduating class of 1993: 

Brian Abrams, Carol 

M Adams, Stefanie Adams, 

'•^■i Adam Albin, Kenneth Allen, 

,;' Charles Andersen, Daniel An- 

•derson, Sheryl Anderson, Jim 

.Andersson, Kelly Andcrton, 

Josh Avila, John Badalamcnti, 

: Brian Balm, Gil Bar-Nahum, 

i Robert Barash, Stacy Bardo, 

; Tncia Barker, Anthony Baron. 

Holly Barrera, Jonathan 

i Baitlett, Jeffrey Bartosik, Stu- 

■ i jai Beardman, Diane Beddia, 

I 1' Stacie Bedell, Amy Benkoske, 

J- :iTpdd Berger, Nikki Bergfeld, 

, .Brett Berkowitz, Brett Berlant, 

.Brian Berns, Katherine 

' . Bertagnoli, Amy Beverley, 

' ■ Liiura Beverly, Lorin Blake, 

■Apryll Blcvons. 

: -iLi Mamie Blitz, SethBIumen- 

j ^Ihal, Jeffrey Bobroff, Heidi 

' '. B[behm, Scott Boehmer, Trcva 

! Bbgacrts, Thomas Bonanno, 

I Mitchel Bornstein, Lera 

; Boroditsky, Sheila Bracewell, 

. Etelka Bradjan, Flora Brahmb- 

I halt, Kenneth Bratko, Adam 

Biraver, Mike Bremer, Jeffrey 

Brenner, Alexander Brikman. 

':. .^Terence Brogan, David 

'Brown, Danielle Bruce, 

I ■Thomas Bruner, David Buck- 

1 .. leyJ^Mallhew Burdecn, Robert 

Bluett, Amy Burt, Scan Bush, 

':-'■ 'yateric Butcher, Michael 

I , Cabage, James Caradonna, 

. Ryan Carlson, Jessica Carney, 

Elia Cascjotli III, Kelly 

Cerone, Kelley Chikos. 

Steve Choc, Anuj Chopra, 

Robin Chung, Amy Citron, 

Ken Cloud, Frederick Cohen, 

fPhilip Cole, Shannon Cole, 

Jeffrey S, Coleman, James 



Conn rV, Blake Consdorf, Erik 
Converse, Christine Cooper, 
Paul Corliss III, Giacinto 
Costanza, Karen Cox, Bruce 
Crane. 

Donna Cuisia, Kimberly 
Cummings, Robert Cychosz, 
Shira Danicli, Frederick Dasso, 
John Davis, Michael Dec, 
Kevin Deck, Patrick Dell, 
Sbcri Dilorio, Sabina Dobkin, 
Stephen Docnch, Michael 
Dombeck,. Shelby Dorfman, 
Brian Downs, Nicholas DrosL 

Jenny Drzewiecki, Debo- 
rah Dudcrstadt, Kinga Dudzin- 
ski, Raymond Duke, Elizabeth 
Dutzi, Tadeusz Dziekanski, 
Russ Dzielak, Richard Ehren- 
bcrg, Tiffany Eiserman, Ryan 
Eisfeldt, Mark Elvove, 
Danielle Endrizzi, Arkady 
Epshteyn, Courtney Evoniuk, 
Tyler Evoniuk, Marc Fagan. 

Gloria Parber, Bradley 
Fcldman, Jason Peldman, 
Leslie Peldman, Chris Felice, 
Shawn Fergus, Daniel Fiedler, 
Rachel Field, Setb Fields, 
Dana Fierstein, William Fink, 
Maik Fmn, Stephen Fitzgerald, 
Eric Flodin, Marco Flores, 
Kendra Floyd. 

Maria Forres, Peter Forres, 
Daniel Forster, Kristin Fos- 
sieck, Adam Fox, Lesley 
Freed, Matthew Freitag, Laura 
Friedman, Emily Frisch, 
Meredith Frost, Ryan 
Fuhrmann, Toni Ganlz, Anto- 
nio Garcia, Edward Gershon, 
Ramak Gharib, Gregory Gian- 
ncschi, Claiie Gibbcrt. 

Jonathan Gilmorc, Heather 
Glassberg, Kevin Gtassman, 
Mike Glicksman, Ryan Goble, 
Debra Goldberg, Todd Gold- 
berg, Jay Goldstein, Lee Gor- 
don, Mark Gorokhovsky, Erik 



Gottlieb, Jorie Gould, Jessica 
Goulding, Jill Greenberg, Ja- 
son , Greenfield, Brian Green- 
stein. 

Michael Greybill, Mark 
Griffin, Vickie Gross, Scolt 
Grossbauer, Gerald Grossi, 
Beth Grossman, Anita 
Guaghardi, Lisa Haber, Manda 
Hack, Dalete Hacktn, Lynn 
Hamann, Gregory Hamilton, 
Shelley Hamilton, Christopher 
Harris, Joel Michael Hartstein, 
Alisa Hauser. 

Brandt Heinzingcr, Heidi 
Helgcson, Heather Hencel, 
Jenifer Hickman, Nikhil Hira, 
Robert Hirsch, Carla Hirsen, 
Matthew Hoglund, Even Hoist, 
Nathan Home, Kevin Horwitz, 
Dawn Hucke, Tiffany Huzagh, 
Megan IhmeLs, John Imlah, 

Kimberly Jackson, Natalie 
Jackson, Hannah Jang, 
Christopher Jaroscak, Jamie 
Jclinck, Kai Jiang, Steven 
Johnson II, Brian Jones, 
Matthew Jones, Joseph Joseph, 
Manjiri Joshi, Patrick Joyce, 
Jeffrey Junia, Jason Justus, 
Julie Kabb, Zachary Kalmus, 
Yuri Kaner. 

Douglas Kanter, Judith 
Karlovsky, Jill Karm, Dana 
Karol, Sarah Karvel, Amanda 
Kaufman, Gillian Kay, Ashley 
Kaye, Dawn Keating, Derek 
Keefe, Linda Kelley, Richard 
Kenney, Kimberly Kerivan, 
Lori Kerrick, Ellen Kim 
Jennifer Khn, Won Kim. 

Renee Kimmclman, Julie 
Kipnis, Tanya Klayman, Beth 
Klecblatt, Scott Klingberg, 
Joseph Knebl, Chris Koch, 
James Koller, Amy Konczyk, 
Anthony Kostclny, Jon Kot- 
loski, Katarina Kraljic, Claire 
Krau£e, Jody Krawitz, Kevin 



Tsiakals, Scott Uhwat, 
Anselmo Valdez, Gina Vas- 
eallo^ Jaime Venegas, 
Melissa Ventrone, Michael 
Vcp.trone, Ryan Walker, 
David Wallace, J. Monica 
Wanat, Mitzi Weiland, 
Robert Weirick, m. Denise 
Wendt, Peter Werner, Ryan 
Whisner, Reid Wiersema, 
Michelle Wille, Tracy 
Williams, Jeremy Wirtz, Jodi 



Witt, David Wood, Jeffrey 
Woods, Raquel Wright, Ben- 
jamin Yturralde, ni, Bryan 
Zancho, Melissa Zepeda. 
• The following received 
their diplomas in January: 

Megan Anderson, Bridget 
Backe, Jennifer Busch- 
schacber, Dawn Calabrese, 
Kimberly Campbell, Melissa 
Cook, Colleen Davidson, 
Felicia Demaio, Xenia 



Demitropoulos, . Shivani 
Dcsai, Kurt Gerischer, 
Stephanie Jones, Cole Klap- 
man, Daniel Konko, Brett 
Leisen, Randall Loewecke, 
Gina Mamrot, Kristcne Man- ■ 
ley, Susan Maravicb, Molly 
Jean McOrath, Michelle 
Metes, Earl Pagh, Jason 
Scarano, Annamarie Scbauer, 
Chad Solarz, Therese Wojcik, 
and Catherine Zazula: 



Krol, Nancy Kuczak, Mitchell 
Kuiman. 

Michael Kurtzman, Jason 
Kusbncr, Garry LaBelle, 
Kathryn LaGardy, Stefanie 
Langer, Daryl Lannert, Sheri 
Larson, Heather Laskov, Brian 
Lazar, Christina Lear, Joy 
LeBlang, Liz Ledinsky, Mari- 
bel Lee. Paul Lee, Brandi 
Leese, Jeffrey Lehtman, Adam 
Leonard. 

Abbey Lerman, Adam^ 
Lerner, Jennifer Lessman, 
Jonathan Letchford, Rebecca 
Levenfeld, Aaron Levin, Staci 
Levin, Nina Lewin, Jennifer 
Lifshin, Sharon Lin, David 
Linder, Alissa Lindstrom, 
Dana Lipari, Diana Litvak, 
Ann Livschiz, Michael Li- 
wanag, Timothy Lofgrcn. 

Jordan Lokcnsgard, Steven 
Lubezny, Amber Lucas, 
Zachary Lyndon, Jae Ma, 
Maria Maborang, Christopher 
Maciejewski, Michael Mackie, 
Erich Mahalko, Mark Mahler, 
Shane Mann, Juan Marban, 
Lori Marinaccio, Miguel Mar- 
tinez Jr., Nicholas Martorano, 
Elliot Mathias. 

Tracy May, Heather Mc- 
Dermott, Amy Meadow, 
Matthew Mell, Erin Melnick, 
Laura Menter, Elizabeth Mey- 
ers, Jcnna Michalowski, Gre- 
gory Michels, Denise Misrac, 
Chris Moe, Heather Moldof- 
sky, Jennifer Moon, Nicholas 
Moons, Antony Mores, Steve 
Moriarty, Mark Morland, Lau- 
ren Morowitz. 

David Morris, Brandon 
Mosbergen, Kimberly Mraz, 
EHc Mueller, Shelby Murphy, 
Diana Myers, Amy Norris, 
Theodore Novak, Joseph 
Nuaia, Jason Nuyttens, Amy 
•Olson, Valerie Osbom, Scott 
Osterman, Cynthia Ostrand, 
Sara Overcash, Jillian 



Pagliocca, Tulasi Palicharla. 

Alan Papier, Tracy Parcts, 
tr.hushali Parikh, Jordan 
Parker, Jonathan Parla, Jodi 
Pass, Alexandrea Pataky, Pra- 
tima Patil, Mavion Patt, Brian 
Paul, Patricia Penaherrera, 
Bennett Penn, Sofia Perez, 
Spencer Perlman, Traci Perl- 
stein, Toni Pestine, Karri Pe- 
tersen. 

David Pettegrew, Jennifer 
Pick, Koryn Pickens, Adam 
Pierce, Christine Pieroni, 
Joseph Pierzchala, Mark Pig- 
gott, Adam Fletcher, Jessica 
Podolsky, Chad Pohlmann, 
Travis Pohlmeier, Jason Po- 
morantz, Susan Porpora, 
Zachary Posner, Janiese 
Potempa, Anita Prasad. Kurt 
Preble. 

Michele Pricone, Corey 
Pritcbetl, Tiffany Pumell, Alan 
John Pyrczak, Aaron Rabi- 
novitz, Kara Rakowski, Sophia 
Raslin, Elizabeth Rcetzke, An- 
drew Rieder, Joseph Rizzo, 
Gregory Roberts, Dana Robin, 
Brian Robinson, Joe Roche, 
Susan Roemer, Andrew Rohr, 
Jason Rosenblum. 

Stacie Rosenzweig, Kara 
Rubenstein, David Rubin, Jen- 
nifer Rudich, Ryan Rusin, 
Stephen Russell, Chrisdne Sa, 
Jennifer Samors, Aaron Sam- 
sel, Scan Sanders, Michael 
Scarpino, Eric Schmidt, 
Melissa Schmookler, Stacey 
Schneider, Joel Schuelt, Jen- 
nifer Scbufeldt, Leanne 
Schulz. 

Richard Schwalb, Blair 
Schwartz, Ryan Scully, Scott 
Sellers, Alberto Serra, Howard 
Shack, Lori Shad, Jason She- 
bcrt, Donald Sheridan III, 
Rachel Shields, Elizabeth 
Shlyapintokh, Yolanda Shum, 
Jason Sicgler, David Silver- 
stein, Alexandra Simons, Jen- 



nifer Singer, Jessica Singer. 

Melissa Singer, Scott 
Slivka, Sheri Slove, Jennifer 
Small, Eric Smevold, Daniel 
Smith, Jodi Smith, Nathan 
Smith, Aimee Smoot, James 
Smrz, Heather Snell, Jessica 
Sobel, Shane Soldinger, Amy 
Solomon, Andrew Somerman, 
Rachel Sons, Jeremy Spray. 

Elisa Stamm, Brian Starck, 
Eric Stavriotis, Gary Steciuk, 
August Steger, Jeffirey Steres, 
Brooke Stirsman, Karen Stol- 
man, Christina Stops, Christine 
Stoutenburg, Mat Swanson, 
Bryan Swartz, Randall Swartz, 
CaJlie Symonds, Steven Tabak, 
Christine Talley, Jennifer 
Tauer. 

Jennifer Templer, Amanda 
Thacker, Kenneth Therriault, 
Christopher Thomas, Julie 
TTiompson, Jerc Tidwcll, Bo- 
guslawa Tkacz, Tara 
Tokowitz, Geoffrey Tollefson, 
Mike Tong, Lisa Toniolo, 
Dana Turkel, Jeff Tumbull, 
Tina Urbanski, Leeanna Uzzel, 
Nancy Valaika, David VaJend. 
Lisa Valerio, John Victorine. 

Timothy Vine, Joseph Vir- 
gilio, William Von Gunten, 
Dena Waldcn, Todd Waldrop, 
Jennifer Walhier, Huan Wang, 
Courtney Ward, Martin Weber, 
Elizabeth Webler, Gary 
Wedge, Nicole Weiner, Carisa 
Weiss, Aaron Wemick, Ryan 
West, Juliet Westerberg, Tind- 
ley Whipple, Christopher 
Widick. 

Kevin Wilbelm, Bradley 
Winters, Michael Wisniewski, 
Shawn Wohlt, Susan Wojcik, 
Lisa Wolin, Erin Wolk, Todd 
Wozniewski, Jcanettc Wurm, 
Wade Wyzukovicz, Steven 
Zabcl, Suzie Zaika, Ilcne Za- 
vat, Andrew Zender, Rebecca 
Zerivitz, Carey Zervic and 
Tony Zizzo Jr. 



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Friday, Juno 4. 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 7B 

;;t t LCi'.' > 1 CO J CHOI IJ 



■Nv:- ir- 



»«-f 




\ 



Antloch Community High School 



Antioch Community 
High Scliool has named the 
following candidates for the 
graduating class of 1993: 
Honor graduates 

Thomas Albert, Lisa Al- 
berts, Shane Anton, Patricia 
Apostal, Joshua Bakk, Char- 
lotte Berger, Kristcn Bemabe. 
Megan Bivona, Kelly Bobcr, 
ErikaBoehm, Matthew Bogen- 
schutz, Erin Bonalcs, Ctuisto- 
pher Bracey, Justin Calabtese. 

Brandy Cashmere, Roberta 
Cziczo, Mark Davidson, Jen- 
nifer Dunklau, James Elfcring, 
Betty Eng, Deborah Funk, 
Paula Galinis, EHzabcth 
Goodman, Laurel Gormlcy, 
Stephanie Gorski, Lon Orohs, 
Sheri Hagglund, Kathcrine 
Harris. 

John Harting, Amy Haus- 
man, Carrie Hiller, Carrie 
Holbo, Thomas Hovey, Steven 
Johnson, Alexandra Katris, 
Jeffrey Kehrer, Jason Kill- 
grove, Laura Kocck, Benjamin 
Krenkc, Mitzi Kruse, Melissa 
Lamb, Dong Lee. 

Karin Lieber, Adam Lips, 
Amy Litchfield, Elizabeth 
MaJoney, Amanda Masek, Erin 
McCallum, Brian McGuire, 
Kelly Miller, Pauline Mlosi, 
Daniel Nelson, David Neul, 
Melissa Olcnick, Hideko Oso- 
ria, Kunberly Palcbak. 

Stephanie Patti, Todd 
Paulus, Joann Pccoraro, Adam 
Phillips, Kristin Pierson, Amy 
, Prochnow, Crystal Rommen, 
Angelo Roncone, Paul Ruscko, 
Lisa Salonen, Carrie Saunders, 
Douglas Scopcl, mark Sim- 
borwsky, Charlcne Smith. 

Jason Smolarchuk, Jeri 
Soulak, Mary Stack, Joann 
Tarnowski, Nicole Troedel, 
Michael Vavrina, Danielle 
Voss, Victoria Wais, Karin 
Wallberg, Joan Wcrhane, Jen- 
nifer Wilkc, Heather Wright, 
Megan Zellcr and Raymond 
Zellmer. 
Graduation candidates 

John Abbate, Ian Ander- 
sen, Brandy Anderson, Ryan 
Anderson, Kristin Andrews, 
Dicdcrik Annen, Margaret 
Balccki, Duncan Bardecki, 
Shannon Barnes, Jeffrey 



Becker, Jeremy Becker, Daniel 
Bell, Dana Bersie, Elizabeth 
Biundo, Eric Blaha, Sebastian 
Borys. 

Bruce Borys, Ronald 
Brandt, Jennifer Brausam, 
Brian Bulicck, Randy 
Burgmeier, Michael Burkhart, 
Ethan Caldwell, Robert Can- 
cellare, John Canella, Michelle 
Garden, Heather Carl, Heidi 
Carlson, Richard Castillo, 
Elizabeth Chans, James Chas- 
sercau, Cathlcen Chinn. 

Christina Cillo, Leonard 
Clark, Morgan Connard. 
Joshua Cosncr, Christopher 
Coxon, Kimberly Cozart, 
Candice Cummings, John 
Cunningham, Michael Curran, 
Alicia D'Ambrosio, Glenn 
Davis, Leah Davis, Kathleen 
DeBarge, Kimberly Deiicnne, 
Jamie DeYoung, David Dick- 
ens. 

David Douglass, Eric 
Dumiat, Joseph Dvorak, Rcnea 
Eaton, Anthony Eckhart, 
James Elfcring, Daniel El- 
Iquist, Kashia Estep, Deanna 
Falbo. Heather Faltynek, Kari 
Farina, Helmuth Fendel Jr., 
Jeffrey Fisher, Nicole Fisher, 
Jason Foster. 

Michael Fredcrlcksen, 
Brandy Friedlc, Matthew Fritz, 
Paul Gange, Juanita Garcia, 
Carrie Gardner, Sara Garrison, 
Nicole Garwood, Gary Geer, 
Christopher Gentleman, 
Kristin Gentleman, Bobbie 
Gies, Rob Gillespie, Michael 
Giliiland, Julie Gliddcn, Dou- 
glas Gooch, Glen Goodson. 

Charles Granbcrg n, Ger- 
ald Orasser, Joseph Gray, Ja- 
son Green, Jill Gudgeon, Scott 
Gurzynski, Eric Hagen, 
Christopher Hall, Andrew 
Hallgrcn, Bridget Hanley, Rob 
Hannon, Corry Hansen, Cyn- 
thia Hansen, Ian Hansen, Kcitii 
Hanson, Sherry Hanson, Josh 
Hauenstein. 

Ryan Henkel, Cory Hester, 
Henrik Hey, Ryan Hickey, 
James Hladnik, Carrie Hoi- 
sU-om, Dave Horan, Christo- 
pher Hueckstaedt, John 
Hunter, Peter Ilagan, Matthew 
Isleb, Larry Janke, Chris 
Japuntich, Raqucl Johns, 



Christopher Johnson, Emily 
Johnson, Jean Johnson. 

Shena Johnson, William 
Johnson, Jennifer Johnston, 
Robert Julian, Maria Katris, 
Rebecca Kaup, Colleen Keat- 
ing, Alexander Keeney, 
Christina Kclley, Neil Kessler, 
William Kilimnik, Aimee 
Kitto, Thomas Kjaergaard, 
Laura Klus, Victor Klulh, 
Donald Knigge, James 
Kolanowski, Jennifer Kolb. 

Joseph Kopcmick, James 
Kornfeind, Jennifer Koutny, 
David Kowalcwski, Erika 
Kiucger, Michael Leonard, 
Jennifer Lconhart, Christine 
Letchford, Richard Lcukhardt, 
James Lubkeman, Jeffrey Lul- 
gen, Benjamin Lynch, Bryan 
MacAulay, Bryan MacNaught, 
Christina Major, Dustin 
Makcla, David Malson. 

Melissa Maish, Jodie Mar- 
tin, Denise Matclski, Amy 
Mathis, John Mazzuca, Kerry 
McKevett, Erin McKinncy, 
Michael Mehnert, Sarah 
Meltzer, Simone Michalski, 
Michael Milazzo, Charles 
Miller, Meilecn Miller, Shelley 
Misch, Jake Morgan, Dawn 
Morley, Andrea Murphy. 

David Naskrent, Brian 
Naughton, Eric Newcomb, 
Alan O'Brien, Gary 
Oilschlager, Matthew Padgett, 
Matthew Parmlcy, Jennifer 
PassarcUa, Vipul Patel, Jason 
Patterson, Jason Paulhus, Don- 
ald Payne, Jessica Pcdcrsen, 
Kirsten Pcderson, Sarah Peter- 
son, Adrian Picard, Aaron Piet. 
Siacy Piispanen, Michael 
Plaimer, Mark Plonka, Kirk 
Pluister, Eric Pompeo, Samuel 
Porstner, Cheryl Price, Edward 
Purtell, Gzimc Rahmani, Robb 
Raukohl, Sean Reeves, Craig 
Rcgnier, Frederick Reisch, 
Danielle Rcizner, David 
Rcmter, Thomas Reno. 

Audrey Ridge, Sarah Ring, 
Jennifer Roberts, Dawn 
Robertson, Michael Rodbro, 
James Rogers, Daniel Rogn- 
stad, Rachel Rohde, Riccardo 
Rojas, Rachel Ruszczyk, 
Catherine Ruufaela, Tara Ryan, 
Brian Santiago, Carrie Saun- 
ders, Anton Schamell, Shane 
Schneider. 




iiM^^. 



Lunch break 



Lisa Samuel and Angela Morris take a lunch break In Cook Memorial Park.— 
Photo by James G. Schwarz 



Stephanie Schneider, Kelly 
Schultz, Dawn Schumer, Kelly 
Seidler, Jason Shechan, Kevin 
Sheehan,' Steven Shipway, 
Michelle Simonson, Angela 
Siwula, Mark Sliteris, Chor- 
lene Smith, Nicole Smith, 
-Jennifer Snow, Rochelle Son- 
nenberg, Brian Sparrowgrovc, 
Joseph Splitt. 



Sally Spurlock, Kristinc 
Stolarik, Scott Sytsma, Jason 
Tatro, Jeff Theis, Jennifer A. 
Thompson, Jennifer B. 
Thompson, Michael Thorne, 
Corissa Todd, John Tomany, 
Laura Tomec, Craig Ultsch, 
Amy Verschuercn, Chad 
Vahle, Nikolas Volodka, Brian 
Waidzulis. 



Jessica Walczak, Daniel 
Walker, Jennifer Ward, 
Michael Wegener, Andrew 
Wcnnersten, Jerry Werner, 
Amy White, Jennifer Whitmer, 
Edward Wilcox, Amanda Wil- 
son, John Wilson, Natalie 
Wold, Michael Wulf, Daniel 
Yanca, Brian Yost, Kathryn 
Yukna and Phil Zinkowich. 



North Chicago High School 



North Chicago High 
School has named 
candidates for the graduating 
class of 1993: 

Erica Barnes, Francoise 
Barnes, Angela Bates, 
LaTonya Bell, Graylan Bobo, 
Christopher Boutwell, Kascy 
Brooks, Virgil Brown, Mel- 
lody Bryant, Aumetris Bur- 
dine, Randy Callo, Araceli 
Cervantes, Anthony Cole- 
man, Nicole Coles, Yvonne 
Craft, LaTasha Cunningham, 
Patricia Daniels, Kevin 
Davis, Veda Davis, Mary 
Davison, Andy Dclgado, 
Dawn Dicke, Crystal Doby, 
Stevenson Earl, Derrick 
Fairchild, Lizabelle Favila, 
Yulana Floyd. 

David Gardner, Shanclle 
Garrett, Bacilia Gomez, Es- 
meralda Guzman, Harriet 
Hampton, Charles Harper, HI, 



Craig Henigan, Christopher 
Hincs, Shaedra Hughes, Cyrus 
Johnson, Jr., Thomas John- 
son, ni, Jimmy Jones, Jr., 
Markisba Jones, Christina 
Krcuscher, Danielle Lewis, 
Kortney Little, Shannon Lo- 
gan, DeShawn Louis. 

Sherry Manning, Edward 
McAdams, Christopher Me- 
lendez, Chad Michel, 
Demetrius Mitchell, Gregory 
Mitchell, Scdrick Moore, 
Musette Muhammad, Trevor 
Mullins, Dennis Murphy, Al- 
bert Myers, Jr., Antonio 
Norman, Cristina Pabellon, 
Jamal Patterson, Geoffrey 
Payne, Jennifer Perkins. 

Dominque Pierce, Gregory 
Preston, Jr., Charlene Pride, 
Tonia Pujoc, Randy Raines, 
Fidel Ramos, Karen Ray ford, 
Benjamin Ree, Kimberly 
Robinson, FcUpa Rodriguez, 



Judc Rodriguez, Jesse Ross, 
Laraesa Russell, Cclsa 
Sanabria, Tamara Sanders, 
Timotny Scott, Michael 
Shields. 

Sonjia Smith, Lucindale 
Starks, Todd Stupe, Ronnie 
Survillion, Joyellc Swopcs, 
Dorctte Taylor, Lakcya Tay- 
lor, Margie Varnell, Evan 
Wade, Damian Warner, 
Melissa Weaver, Marsha 
Williams, Ramsey Williams, 
William Yelland, and Ivica 
Zaher. 




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Village of Grscyslsike 

33 S. Whitney 
Gxayslake 

Congrats Rams! 





ROOD OF YOU.... 

!HPI!DIUVJ>ES 0!F '93 ! 

We Wish You All Success And Happiness 



A\^tff 



State Bank; 
of Antioch 




"A Cash Station Bank" 

Ask about our free checking tor full lime sludentsl 



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440 W.Lake St. 

Antioch 
(708)395-2700 



2031 E. Grand Ave. 

Lfndenhurst Facility 

(708) 356-5700 



L 



CONGRATULATSONS 

& BEST WISHES TO 

THE CLASS OF 1 993 



Grossman Plumbing 



5 Meade Court 

Fox Lake/ IL 

RON HILL - Owner 

(708) 587-7012 




CONGRATUUITIONS 
- CLASS OF *93 

STATE FARM 
?^^sx INSURANCE 

29 E. Grand Ave. 
Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-7202 

Bob Misiek - Agent 




Congratulations 

and 

Our Best Wishes! 

CMC Waukegan 

200 Seahorse Drive 
Waukegan, IL 60085 

GOOD LUCK 
1993 GRADUATESI 



Gonqraiuiaiions 
^raauaies I 

Lakeland 




Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 
Grayslake, IL 



(708)223-8161 







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OBITUARIES 



i^^^MZini »<tSirj<^.-y«.«%*ijt?j^gj^>?^~>^?i!«^ 



Arthur F. Smejkal, Sr. 

Age 79 of Pinellas Park, Rorida fonnerly of Lake 
Villa, IL passed away Saturday, April 17, 1993 at his 
home. He was bom September 26, 1913 in Chicago, IL, 
moving to Lake Villa in the 1930s and then to Pinellas 
Park, Florida in 1982. An had owned a bulk Shell Oil 
business prior to WW 11 and during the war became a 
flight engineer with Douglas Aircraft testing war 
planes. After the war, he worked as parts manager for 
the Elmer Rentncr Chevrolet garage (now Raymond 
Chevy/Olds/Gco), in Antioch. In 1969 he became a 
deputy sheriff in the Bailiff Div. at the -Lake County 
Courthouse in Waukcgan until 1979 when he retired. 
An was a member of the Federation of Musician's 
Union #284 A F of M, Waukegan and the Greater St. 
Petcrs-burg/Clearwalcr Musician's Assoc. Local #427 
A F of M. He had played drums for many years in the 
local area and also had his own band. An was a mem- 
ber of the Lions Club of Antioch for over 50 years. 

Survivors include his wife of almost 60 years, Clara; 
one son Arthur (Mary) Smejkal, Jr. of Gumcc, IL; two 
daughters, Patricia (Edmund) Ollz of Round Lake 
Beach, IL and Susan Coles (her good friend, Paul 
HcUcr) of Grayslake, IL. Grandfather of Ait HI, David, 
Betty, Holly, Mike, Rachel and Rebecca. Great grand- 
father of Jim, Cathy, Alexis aijd Tancr; Uncle of many 
nieces and nephews and his good friends. 

Memorial services will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday, 
June 5," 1993 at The Strang Funeral Home, 1055 Main 
St (Rtc. S3), Antioch, IL. Internment will be private at 
Hillside Cemetery, Antioch, IL. In lieu of flowers, 
those desiring may make contributions to the Antioch 
Lions Club in his memory. • ' 



Jennie M. Pedersen 

Age 90 of Antioch passed away Wednesday, May 
26, 1993 at Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center, 
Lindcnhurst, IL. She "was bora August 31, 1902 in 
Chicago, IL moving to Antioch in 1951. She was a 
member of St, Stephoi Lutheran Church of Antioch; 
The A.A.R.P. and Senior Citizens of Antioch. Mrs. 
Pedersen worked for several years as an office secretary 
and Switch Board operator for the Bcarslcy and Piper 
Co, in Chicago. 

Survivors include one'son, Roland of Antioch. 

She was preceded in death by her husband Martin L. 
Pedersen on July 17; 1988, two sons, Russell and 
Keimcth, and by seven brothers and sisters. 

Funeral services were held at 11 ajn. Saturday, May 
29, 1993 at St. Stephen Lutheran Church of Antioch, 
with Pastor Charles Miller officiating. Interment was m 
Hickory Union Cemetery, Edward Rd., Antioch. 
Friends called at the Strang Funeral Home, 1055 Main 
ST., (Rtc. 83) Antioch from 4 tmtil 8 p.m. Friday and at 
the church &om 10 ajn. Saturday until time of services. 
Friends desiring may make contributions to the Antioch 
Rescue Squad in her memory. 



Justen's Round Lake Funeral Home 

222 North Rosedale Court 
Round Lake, Illinois 60073 

708/546-3300 

OurJUll-service Funeral Home offers: 

• pne-anangement planning 

• pre-funded funerals 

• traditional services 

• contemporary services 

• customized services 




Fimcral Director and Owner 

Mark L. Justen 

Saving Round Lake for over 30 yeais 



George R, Justen & Son Funeral Home 

3519 West Elm Street, McHcnry 



Justen's Wonder Lake Funeral Home 

761 1 Hant»ck Drive, Wonder Lake 




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DEATH NOTICES 



ARMSTRONG 

Richard D. 

Armsirong, 64, of 
Tiplon, Indiana, 
formerly of Round 
Lake, IL. Arr: Allen 
Funeral Home, 

Bunker Hill, Indiana. 
ARTY 

Clement J. Arty, 51, 
of Nortii Chicago, IL. 



Arr: Bradshaw & 
Range SouUi Chapel, 
Waukegan, IL. 
BLUE 

John J. Blue, 70, of 
Lake Villa, IL. Arr: 
Ringa Funeral Home, 
Lake Villa. IL. 
BUNDSGAARD 
Richard C. 

Bundsgaard, 69, of 



Gumee, IL., formerly 

of Waukegan, IL. Arr: 

Gurnee Funeral 

Home, Gumee, IL. 

HOOK 

Charlcne J. Hook, 70, 

of Naples, FL, 

formerly of Antioch, 

IL, Arr: Marsh 

Funeral Home of 

Gumee, Gumee, EL. 

LARSEN 

Nedra A. Larscn, 87, 

of Libcrtyvillc, IL. 



Understanding 

Grief 

From time to time ure are all confronted with 
understanding feelings of loss or offering 
support to others. Our firm has a variety of 
books and brochures that can be of assis- 
tance when you need information on the 
subject of death. Some of the most frequently 
requested information relates to explaining 
death to children, after a loved one has died 
and coping with grief. Please feel free to give 
us a call, and we will make arrangements to 
provide a variety of educational materials 
that can be of help to you and others. 



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12 N. PIstakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 
Phone:(708)587-2100 • (815)385-1001 



Arr: Burnett-Dane 
Funeral Home, 

Libcrtyville, IL. 
LEGATE 

William L. Legale, 
Jr., 55, of 

Libcrtyvillc, IL. Arr: 
Buracll-Danc Funeral 
Home, Libcrtyvillc, 
IL. 

MARCHEL 
Vera R. Marchcl (nee 
Ullbcrg), 67, of 
Lindcnhurst, IL. Arr: 
Ahlgrim and Sons 
Funeral Home, 

Palatine, IL. 
MENNITI 

Casarc Mcnniti, 61, of 
Libcrtyvillc, IL. Arr: 
BumcU-Danc Funeral 
Home, Libcrtyvillc, 
IL. 
REESE 

Mary E. Reese. 83, of 
Gurncc, IL. Arr: 
Strang Funeral 

Chapel, Grayslake, 
IL. 

STANOVNIK 
Gcraldinc "Geri" 
Slanovnik, 63, of 
Waukegan, IL, 

formerly of North 
Chicago, IL. Arr: 
Private. 
WEISS 

Anton Weiss, 67, of 
Antioch, IL. Arr: 
Strang Funeral Home, 
Antioch, IL. 
WERENSKI 
Anne C, Wercnski, 
80, of Nortli Chicago, 
IL. Arr: Private. 
WOLFE 

Lonn T.Wolfe, 18, of 
Lake Zurich, IL. Arr: 
Ahlgrim & Sons 
Funeral Home, Lake 
Zurich, IL. 



YOURICH- 
DRINKWTNE 

Lillian Drinkwinc 
Yourich, 77, of 
Waukegan, IL, 

formerly of North 
Chicago, IL. Arr: 
Congdon Funeral 
Home, Zion, IL. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 




Notices 



■HOMATIC CANDLELITE 
WEDOtNGS" Smotey Mountains 
*Ordainod Ministers 'Elegant 
Chapel 'Photographs 'Florals 
•Umos •Videos 'AcconxjdaUons 
'Modest Prices! 'No waiting- 
blood losis 'Gallinburg, Tenn. 
•1/800-WED-RING. 

"REUNIONS" 
BAHRINGTON CLASS OF 1984. 
Is seeking dassmates (or 1994 
Rounioa Conlad Alumni Systems 
at 815)477-0858 or (800)924- 
6643 (Chicago Suburban areas 
only). 

"REUNIONS" 
BARRtNGTON CLASS OF 1983. 
WILL bo hold Homecoming 
weekond Friday, October B. 
Banington Barquots in Bajrington. 

• ' REUNIONS* • 
GRAYSLAKE CLASS OF 1983. 
Will tH) held Saturday, October 
16, 1D33, Homocofning weekend, 
at Holiday Inn, Mundeloln. 
Additional Inlormallon: Contact 
Alumni Systems at (815)477- 
0858 Of (600)924-6643 (Chicago 
Suburban areas only). 

"REUNIONS" 
GRAYSUVKE CLASS OF 1963. 
seeking classmates lor reunkin 
tentatively sel lor July 24 at 
Gumee Holiday Inn. Conlacl 
John Carlson al (708)362-5101 
wilh Information. 

"REUNIONS" 
WARREN CLASS OF 1984. Is 
seeking classmates lor 1994 
Reunkin. Addtt tonal Inloimatton: 
Contact Alumni Systems at 
{ai5)477-0858 or (800)924 6643 
(Chkago Suburt>an areas onty). 

"REUNIONS" 
WARREN CLASS OF 1963. Will 
be hokl Saturday, October 16, 
1993, at the Princess in 
Llxxtyvlo. Addilional iniormatlon: 
Contact Alumni Systems at 
(81 5)477.0858 Of (800)924-6643 
(Chkago Sutxifban areas only). 




The Deadline for 

Obituaries & Death 

Notices is 5 p.m. 

on Tuesday. 





ANNOUNCEMENTS 



w-jtaijt-»i*t'-gjsp«ie^- ;»i<«g.«OiW^<i»st?fei(<'CT*'-MJg"«'yay! yiao*?*.! . | 




Notices 




Lost & Found 



"REUNIONS" 
WAUCONI3A CLASS OF 1983, 
Wilt bo heM Friday October 1, 
1993, Homecoming weekend, 
at Barrington Banquets in 
Banlngloa AddbnaJ irrformalion: 
Contact Alumni Systems at 

(815>477-Oe58 or (800)924-€643 

(Ctilcago Suborban areas onty). 

• • REUNIONS* * 
V/AUKEGAN CLASS OF 1953, 
Will be held both Frkjay (Ice- 
breaker) and Saturday (dinner), 
August 20,21, 1993 at Bonnie 
Brook Courtry Club. Waukegan. 
Aryone Interested ki atl^vJIng or 
krKwtng of someone from this 
class please call Additional 
information: Contact AfumnI 
Systems al (815)477-0858 or 
(800)924-6643 (Chicago 
Suburtian areas only). 

* • REUNIONS' • 
WAUKEGAN CLASS OF 1968, 
Win tw heki Saturday August 7, 
1993 at the Holiday Inn, 
Mundoloki. Adcftnnal kiomtAVxv. 
Contact AfumnI Systems at 
(815)477-0858 Of (600)924-6643 
(Chicago Suburban areas only). 

"REUNIONS" 
ZION BENTON CLASS OF 1984. 
IS S4M)king ctassnnalos (or 1994 
Reunton. Addtttonat Informatton: 
Contact Alumni Systems at 
(815)477-0658 Of (800)924-6643 
(Chkago Suburtan areas only). 

"REUNION 1 I" 
LAKE ZURICH HIGH SCHOOL 
Class of 1973 Is Planning their 
20lh Class Reunion lor Oct. 
1993. If you have any infomalkxi 
or rwod any — I yoo havo moved 
or know of anyone who has, 
please cortadSharofi (708)566- 
4724 or (}ot)ble (708)516-4313. 
Ptoase call If you would like to 
help. 

"REUNIONS" 
ROUND LAKE CLASS OF 1983. 
WUI bo tioW Saturday, October 
2. 1993, Homecoming wockond, 
at Holiday Inn, Mundoleln. 
Additional Information: Conlacl 
Alumni Systems al (8 15)477- 
0858 Of (600)924-6643 (CMc^O 
Suburban areas only). 

14 TH ANNUAL MIDNIGHT 
TOUR!! SalcrJay Juno 12. 1993, 
JOIN THOUSANDS OF RIDERS 
In tlw Mk^lffisrs Largest escorted 
group ride. Vendors, 
entertainment, food and 
beverages, guest porsonatlltos, 
motorcycle services and 
accessories. Gates open 5pm 
Of appfoxltTatoty 65mle escorted 
tour. Maryvllle Academy. Central 
and River Rds., Des PlaJnes, IL 
RkJo departs 10pm. Arrive early 
SS.OOpGtsoa No Pfo-rogstralion 
roqulrod"|ust be Ihorel For 
additional Intormation call 
(708)635-6724. 



ARE YOU THAT Good 
Samarltlan who FOUND 
someones PET or spedal k>s) 
A/1kJe7 Cal Lakeland Ctassilied. 
and gel results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE o( Charge. Gall 
(708)223-8161. 

FOUND- COCKATBL. FRIDAY, 
May 14lh. VIClNrTY ol FaWlekl 
and Passavant Rds., Round 
Lake Beach, Call to fdenttly. 
(708) 740-4814. 

FOUND: S/23fl3 A RING, In the 
GREAT AMERICA PARKING 
LOT. CALL to IDENTIFY. (708) 
336-1872. 

LARGE BLACK DOG, FOUND 
In Ctunnet Lake Bluff SubdMdoo 
area, Antioch. Call to identify. 
(708) 83a-0752. or (708)634- 
2800. exl 483. 

LOSTI COCKATIEL. HAY 10, 
Round Lake Beach area, ligtit 
Groy, very friendly. Name Is 
Pelrfe. (708)740-2781 days or 
(708) 740-6854 evenings. 



Free 



SPRING CLEANING77 FREE 
AND GIVEAWAY ITEMS CAN 
RUN HERE AT NO CHARGEI 
(We discourage any pet ads) 
CALL TODAY. (708) 223-8161. 



Personab 



ADOPTION- A LOVING 
ALTERNATIVE. Please help us 
make ourdream come true. We 
are a very caring and successful 
coupto wtK) wani to become lull 
tmo parorts to yotx baby. We ask 
you to consider us artd know 
that your ctild wfl have a lletkno 
of k>ve, tuppjrwss, and security, 
Medk:al, legal, counseling and 
court approved living exper^ses 
paid. Information confidential. 
Ptoaso cal our atlomuy (708)957- 
6837. 

ADOPTION- ANNEMARIE'S A 
Kindergarten leactier, Marty's a 
Business executtve. Wo woukl 
tove to give your newtmm love, 
tiappiness and a woodoif ul future. 
EXPENSES Paid. Cat l.'SOO- 
847-1517. _^ 

ADOPTION- INFERTILE 
COUPLE Emoltonafy/Flnandaly 
secure long lor a baby. 
Cofifkierilal related eitpertorwes. 
Ea^ to taJclo, Cal Maj^aretXkitin 
at twme toll tree. 1/600-438- 
7931. 

ADOPTION- LOVING, DOVWJ to 
earth coupk) k)ng to give your 
baby a hepfv homo wBi a ful time 
Mom, a cailng Dad and unlmHed 
opportunlttos. 9-cousins eagerly 
await a now playmalo. Cal Diane 
and Michael, CoHoct (708)289- 
6508. We are easy to talk with! 



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FfldQy,Juno4.,l993 



Lakeland Newspapers 33 



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Lakeland 

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Psfsonals 



ADOPTION- PROFESSIONAL 
COUPLE unable to have our 
own child. We would love to 
adopt an InlanI lo share our tits. 
HavG homo In a woodod area wHh 
lots ol neighborhood chlldron, 
good schools, relatives and 
friends who have also adopted 
children and a loving and 
supportive extended (amiV- Call 
us at our home Toil-Free 1/800- 
377-1602 Aviva/Lee. 

GERMAN BOY, 17, anxiously 
awalling host family. Enjoys 
sports And MUSIC. Other 
Scandinavian. European high 
school students arrtving August. 
Gall Bart)ara (217)243-8453 or 
1/BOQ-SIBLING. 

HELP US FULFILL OUR 
DREAMS. We are a kving ooupto 
thai longs to sham our lives arxl 
bve wlh a tiaby. We can provide 
a htappy and secure lite lor your 
child, a traautltul and spacious 
suburban home and many 
wondertul opportunlllos. Legal 
and allowable expenses paid. 
Please call our attorney, SARA 
(312)975-0535 (contldenllal, 
collect OK) TJ. 

RUSSIAN BOY, 17, anxiously 
'awaiting host family. Enjoys 
sports and computers. Other 
Scandinavian, European high 
school students arriving August. 
Call Bart>ara (217)243-8453 or 
1/BOO-SIBLING. 

TIRED?, FAT1GUED7,0R Just 
lacking that little something. 
Some call It 'the Fountain of 
Youth In a bottle". Others |usl 
say 'Eureka'l Imagine when 
everyone knows. For Wormallon 
packet, sent S3.00 (refunded on 
Isl order)to: GO Georgia Rd., 
Great Lakes, IL 60088. 



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EMPLOYMENT 



^MdUUMUU^^iU^^U^^AM^^^U 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



FRIENDLY HOME PARTIES 
now has openings for 
demonstrators. No cash 
Investment. Part-time hours will 
full lime pay. Two calalogs. over 
700 Hems. Call 1/800-486-4875. 



HELP WANTED 

AFTERNOONS 

CAR PORTER 

Call Tom 

(708) 680-7001 

ENTERPRISE 
RENT-A-CAR 




Fast Food Restaurant 

needs mature, depend- 
able, experienced 

PERSON 

for 6 days a week, 10 a jn. 

lo 3 p.m. Good pay to 

right penon. Call 

(708) 336-SUBS 



DELIVERY 

WORK 

Lakeland Newspapers 
has openings in our 
circulation department 
on Thursdays and 
Fridays. In this }ob, 
you will deliver copies 
of our papers to local 
merchants. A car is 
required and you must 
be extremely depend 
able. Ideal for a retired 
person. Contact 
BobSchroederat 
(708) 223-8161 

Lakeland 

- Newspapers 

Qrayslaks, IL 



(708)223-8161 



EMPLOYMENT 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



HetpWartted 
Full-Time 



Help Wanted 
Part-Tmoe 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



CLEAN/ 
NAINTAIN 

3 adjacent 

homes and 

surrounding 

grounds 

(708) 548-2644 



Personal Asstslant 

for buiy Aniioch 
Real Eilnle office. 
Flexible houra. Lite 
typing & lome com- 
puter knowledge. 
Call 

(708)395-7900x104 

& leave message 



ta. 



Part Time 
SEAMSTRESS 

Lake Zurich area 

Phone Jan 
(708)381-1525 



SINGERS NEEDED 

Contemporary Christian 
Choir 'Tell the Woikr need* 
good voices, aaet 14-33. No 
pay but lots oT ■ailtlactlon. 
Caill for delaJla. 

(708) 526-8306 

AsklorWanorMlrtam 



WANTED! 

Retired or seml-reilred 
person in good health 
neoded (or some light 
jenilorlal duties. Basic 
maintenance with some 
iighl lifting required. No 
experience needed, just a 
desire to do a good job, 
t5 lo 20 houis per week, 
can be flexible lo iit your 
schedule. For interview 
appointmem, please call 

Bill Schroeder, Jr. 

UKELAND NEWSPAPERS 

(708) 223-8161 



REPORTERS 
NEEDED 

Arc you interested in 
local government? 
The Round Lake 
News is looking for 
frcc-lancc reporters 
to cover Round Lake 
area village and 
school board meet 
ings. Reporters are 
paid per meeting cov- 
ered. For more infor- 
mation cull 
Claudia M. Lenart 
Regional Editor 

223-8161 



1(708) 



HOUSEKEEPING 
POSITIONS 

Prior experience helpful. 

Immediate openings. 

Flexible hours. 

Apply in person 

Com fort Jnn 

Gumee Mills 






STUDENTS 

Here's a great opportunity fcx college and mature high schoo) 
students - team the exciting (lekJ of 

TELEMARKETING 

if you enjoy talking on the phone, here's an OKcellent way to 
sharpen your peopte skQts and make money. 
Wo offer... 
•Pleasant Working Conditlorvs 

• [flexible Part-Time Evening Hours 

• Hourly wage pkjs commisidon 

Can Nigel 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney 
Grayslake, IL 

(708) 223-8161 





We have immediate part time openings lor 

EXPERIENCED 

LAWN a GARDEN 

TECHNICIANS 

Must be able to work Weekdays & -Saturdays, 

CUSTOMER RELATIONS 

9:00-2:00 pm Daily 

Immediate employee discount. Call for appointment. 

SEARS SERWGE CENTER 

1951 Waukegan Rd. Bannockburn, IL 

(708) 948-1540 

EOE/MF 






TELEMARKETING 

We're looking for people who 
enjoy talking on the phone. If you 
do, we'll train you in the exciting 
field of Telemarketing. We Offer: 

•Pleasant Worldng Conditions 
•Part Time Evening & Saturday Hours 
•Hourly Wage Plus Commission 

This is an ideal position for 
someone wanting to supplement 
thoir income. Sound good? 
Then call Nigel. 

Lakeland 

New^apers 
30 S. V/hitney, P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 

(708) 223-81 61 





I 



Help WantGd 
Full-Time 



YOU ALWAYS 

HIT THE 
MARK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



DRIVERS WANltD- FUMBED 
EXPERIENCE. New 

converttonals, Paid, Weekly 
Loaded^nptty MBos. Ue/Healh 
Insuranoo, Boms, Ridor Pro-am. 
ADVANCED DISTRIBUTION 
SYSTEM 80O<»4-1O47. 24-hfS.- 
•7 days woek. 

ATTENTION VETERANS. EARN 
Extra Income and reliroment 
benefits, tf you're age 40 or less, 
the Illinois Amny National Guard 
neods your oxporlence. Call 
1/BOO-OK-GUARD. 

BARR-NUNN TRANS- 

PORTATION HAS Immediate 
openings for exportertccd OTR 
drivers. For top pay and bonollts 
with a (amity atmosphere call 
1/800-369-252S. BatT-Nunn Dos 
Molnos, Iowa. 



CANDIDATES WANTED TO 
LOSE WEIGHT NOWil No Will 
power Needed. 100% natural 
and 100%8Uafanteed. [>octor 
Recommended. 1/B00-324- 
6420. 

FULL TWE- GRAYSLAKE Saton 
under new Managemonl. Needs 
Reld}le Beautidan wlh Folowing. 
TOP commlslon and GREAT 
hours! Please call, (708)223- 
5800. 

HAROLD IVES TRUCKING 
Hiring drivers. Eam up to290 mie 
Assigned tractors with Motorola 
Communkattons. rkter program, 
students wekximo, Insurance, 
bonuses, Call 1/800-842-0853. 

LICENSED LIFE & Hoalh Agent 
needed. Quality products, high 
commfeslcns VNth advarwo bdore 
Isstio, lead system, and bonetls. 
(Must qualify for advances and 
bonotlts) Call (1/600)252-2561 . 

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING 
DIFFERENT? Give us a Try. 50 
companies lo select trom. Up 
to 2H to start. Rider program. 
Assigned trucks. 40lK/Hoalth 
Insurance, Minimum 1yr. OTR. 
Minimum age 23. Clean MVR. 
1/800-554-0473. 



MANAGERS NEEDED: NEWLY 
patented product. Tornado Alamn! 
Several positions available. 6 
figure potenliall Send inquiries: 
Safety Tech., 3100 Brown Stalloa 
Columbia, Missouri 65202. 



Help Wanted 



Need own tools & 
transportation 

$15-$20 per hour 

Call 
(708)587-8517 



COUNTER/STOCK 



for electrical fixers 
and supply store. 
Apply in person at 

Wanen Electric 

33261 N. Hwy. 45 

Wildwood, IL 





Twin 



•Silver Lake 



Kenosha 
County 

•Bristol 



•Kenosha 




Metra 
zMHwaukee 
RR 



Cook County 



A]MOl7KCE9iEVrS 9IARIiET GIJIDE RTjitEOTATe 



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Frae 


3 


Pwsonoli 


4 


Auctknt 


S 


Butlrwu PorKKMit 


e 


Financial 


7 



He^ Wanted Port -TVno IS 

H«tp Wonted Ful-Tlma 20 

Errpioyment AgeridM 21 

Butln««s Opporluntlea 22 

Wok Wanted 23 

OMdCoro 24 

Scteo^nstnxalon 25 

MARKKT GUIDE 

Amlquai 30 

ApptlancM 31 

Bonor/Trade 32 

Bazaaji/Crafu 33 

BuMIng Motarlait 34 

Butlneu/Ottlcs Equlpasnt 35 

Ettdronlca/Conputari 30 

Farm Guhta 37 

FlfMWod 30 

Qafao^ummoga Soloa 40 



Good Things to Eat • 41 

Horaes &. Tack 42 
HoUBohoid Qooda/Fumllure 43 

JaWQJry 43A 

Lawn/Qarden 44 

Mbcallaneous 4S 

Medical Equip/Supplioa 4SA 

Musical Irntrumanti 46 

Pets & Supplies 47 

Toob & Machinety 4S 

Wonted To Buy 49 



REALESTiUne 

Homee For Sols GO 

Home* For Rom 61 

Homes Wanted 62 

Homw Bultden 53 

Condo/Town Homea 54 

Mobile Homea 55 

Apuitmonu For Rent 56 

ApannwfTto Wonted S7 

ApL/Hotnea To Shore 66 

Roorra For Rent 60 

BuaineH Prtperty For Sale 60 

Bu»lr.«M Property Fo» Bent 61 

Forrm 62 

Vacani Lati/Acieaoe 63 

Rsaoftt/Vacakm Rentota 64 

Out o( Area Propeity 65 



CemelaryUM 66 

Real Eatole Wonlod 67 

Real Eetals MIm^ 66 

R£CR£A!nOI«AL 

ReawtkKialVehbiM 70 

SnowmoWte/ATVa 71 

Boal>JMator«/Elc 72 

Caxrplng 73 

TraveWacalkxi 74 

Spon* Equipment 76 

Akplonot 76 

mAKSPOincAnoiv 

Can For Sole 60 

RentoVLeaioc Bt 

Ctntk^Antlque Can 62 

Servtoe&Poxu 63 

Coj Loono/lnauranca 84 

Vara 65 

TnJdia/Trailert 66 

Heavy Equipment 67 

Motorcycles 66 

Warned To Buy 90 

iSERTiCEDmEcromr 

Apptianoeo Ropair St 

Btaddop S3 



SERTICBDIRECrORr 

Bulklem S5 

Carpentry S7 

Carpet Oeantng S8 

CoftcrDta/Cemant Sfl 

OryWol S10 

EducstiofVlnitrucilon S11 

Eledrlcal S13 
Firewood S13A 

Handyman S14 

HaaUniyAlrCondftktrJng SIS 

Housekeeping S16 

Londacapfatg Si 7 

Laundry/Cleaning S10 

Legal S«(vk»s S21 

Moving/Storage S23 

Polmlng/decorelina S25 
PomLBga/Typing Servlcea 526 

PlwTblng S27 

Foots S29 

ProaaursWDshlng S30 

Proleesbnal GeMoea S31 

hadkVTV Repair S33 

RemodeEng S35 

Heeumes S37 

Rootino'SidIng 330 

Stomge S41 

ToxServke 343 

Trtes/Planls S45 

Wedding 347 

Mlacolaneous S4B 



Lakeland^s Classified Ads appear In all 14 newspapers with a 

Readership of over 200,000 



NOTICE TO ADVERnSERS 

Pleaae chedt your ad on the FIRST intenton data. In Ihe even) o( on ttrcx or omlstbn, we wil be rasponibia lor ONLY ttte FIRST Incorrect 
IriMrtion. Ttm newspaper wil be responsM* lor only Ihe ponkxi of ttie ad tlut f« in amy. Ptaoia notfy Itte ClauKled Depoitmenl in the event ol an 
error within 1 week ol njn dda. CANCELLATIONS nust be made prk>r lo 5 p,m. on the Tuesday before F>ubialk)n. 

Lakeland Newipapere rseervae the right to pnipedy daaslfir ol adtrerlislng.'edk or deleta any o^edkmabta wonling, or reied any odvertitameni 
lor credk or policy reosorvs. 

All He^ Wanted odvenislng it pubtislied under unKled headings. Lakeland Newipapen does not knowingly accept help wanted advertising that in 
any way vtolatee itte Human Rights Ad. 



Hours: Monday - TIiursday 

e A.M. - e P.M. 

Friday 8 a.m. - 6 pm, 

Saturday 8:30 a.u. - Noon 

DEADUNE: 

Wednesdays at 10 a.m. 



(708) 223-8161 

Fax.: (708) 223.8810 




Mas/orC.ird 



Payment in advance ts required 

FOR THESE ADS: 

• Adverfisars out of tjkeland circulation a/oa 

• Business Oppodunkloe • Mobile Homee 

• Skuaiions Wanted • Debt Disdalman 

• Oarage and Moving Salea* 

•Found and Giveaway Ads are FREE. 

Nop9t$wllb& cofutiwwdlofg/vMway. 



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U tj&k«MM M^j^^tS 



xkA^Vl 



Frlddy> Juno 4; 199311 






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'ilJiUlli 



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EiWPLOYMENT 



KelpWahtdd 
Full-Tlme 




Help Wanted 
Full-Tlme 



I OPERATORS I 

% with dump trailers, | 
J rkon-seosona! dump J 
! & flatbed work. J 
S ARROW SPECIAUZEDj 
% CARRIERS % 
JC7O8) 587-0022J 



Rceepiionisi/ 
Secretary 

forliusyexparxllng 
Real Estate office 

in Gumee. 

Call Kim 

(708) 336-2600 

for interview 






MASTERS LEVEL 
PSYCHOLOGIST 

Must have 
experience with 
developmentally 
disabled population 
and be familiar 
with behavioral 
programming, test- 
ing, and assess- 
ments for special 
population. 

Call Cathy Melting 

(708) 438-5050 

MOUNT ST. JOSEPH 
LAKE ZURICH 



RECEPTIONIST/ 

CUSTOMER 

SERVICE 

Lakeland Newspapers 
is seeking a quaJified 
candidate to fill a posi- 
tion of Receptionist/ 
Customer Service. 
Tfie right candidate 
will be enthusiastic, 
willing to learn, enjoy 
working with the pub- 
lic, and be able to 
handle multiple phone 
lines. Computer expe- 
rience helpful but will 
train right candidate. 

Please apply In 
person at: 

Lakeland 
Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake.lL6QQ30 



•^ 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 







i 



i 



NOW HIRING FOR 
SUMMER HELP 

50 Positions 
Available 

•Cashiers 
•Cooks 
•Full-Tlme 
•Part-Time 

"Weekend Only" 

Available till end 

of school year. 

$5.00 starting 
Wage 

GURNEE 

5300 Grand, across 
from Great America 



LIMO DRIVER 
WANTED 

Long hours. Retirees 

welcome to apply. 

Wauconda area 

prafarred. 

Call 
(708) 526-3094 



SHIPPING/ 
RECEIVINCi 

Experience necessaiy \ 
Stable background 

: (708) 244-001 6 

iipetior JLcrtonoel! 



Now is your 

opportunity to join our 

exciting team at 

TOWN HALL ESTATES 

in Wauconda 

We offer a family 

atmosphere, competitive 

wages and benefits 

Up to $7.50 per 

hoiur wi<l» exp. 

Debbie Jung or 

Troy Waabbum 

(308) 526-5551 



PRESS 
PERSON 

Toko 4750/multi 
1218 with T51 
Stripping, Dark 
Room, and working 
knowledge of a small 
print shop a plus 

Call 
(708) 662-4485 



YOU ALWAYS Hl¥ 
TH E MAR K WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



^ TELEMARKETING ilr 

With a smile in your voteel Place outgoing calls 

to corporations. Full or Part time, days or 
^ evenings. Room for growth. x 

(708) 244-001 6 S«P«ri«Boanel 



I 



ACTIVITY ASSISTANT 

Hillcrest Nursing Center is 

actively seeking a Part Time 

individual to work evenings and 

weekend activities. 

Call Ann Murphy at 

(708) 546-5300 or 

Apply in Person 

1740 N. Circuit Dr. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 



I EVSIDE) S»ALE)i$ 

Do you enjoy variety? Do you enjoy a 
challenge? Do you thrive in a fast 
paced, dynamic environment? If so, you 
could be the person we're looking fori 

Lakeland Newspapers Is seeking the right 
person to Join our exciting Sales 
Department. You will be a success if you 
possess good organizational skills, com- 
munication skills, and are self moUvated. 
If you are looking for a rewarding career, 
investigate this position todayl 

Please send resume to 
Attn: Ann Roberts 

Lalceland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60080 

Fax: (708) 223-8810 
Phone: (708) 223-8161 



EIECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
DEPT. ASSISTANT 

We are a leading manufacturer of 
industrial ovens and furnaces. We 
have an excellent opportunity for an 
individual to work in our Electrical 
Engineering Department doing minor 
electrical drafting, preparing operating 
manuals, and order review. Must be 
high school graduate. Electrical draft- 
ing experience desirable. We offer 
competitive salary, comprehensive 
benefit program and profit sharing. 
Please call or send resunne to: 

Ken Steiner 
(708) 546-8225 




aiHE GRIEVE CORPORATION 



INDUSTRIAL & LABORATORY OVENS & FURNACES 
500 HART ROAD • ROUND LAKE. ILL. 60073 



RjV Kelp Wanted 


BTiV- Help Wanted . 
Emm FuH-Time 


Full Time 

HOUSEKEEPER 




Expanding long lenn 
liealtJi care facility in 
Long Grove seeks a 


Immediate 

Opening for 

housekeeper. 

Call Sister 




people oriented 

GENERAL 
OFFICE 

person for a. variety ordutJe* 
Hours 9-5:30, Th-M 


Gertrude 

Mount 




SEND RESUME TO: 

BoxSS 

c/o Lakeland 


St. Joseph's 




Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 


Lake Zurich. ILl 


Grayslake, IL 


(703) 438^050| 


60030 


Lakeland Classitleds 
Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 




I H^ Help Wanted 
Full-Time 




vHelp Wanted 
' ' FutTtme 



$$$$$$$$$$$$ 

BANKING 

Senior Teller, 
Full Time 

Min. 3 yrs 
experience 
Vacation- 
Benefits 
Competitive 
salary 

CaU 

Mr. Rosner! 

(708)949-9000! 

^$ssss$s$$$ 



HOMEMAKERS, 
COLUGESnJDENTSi 

HEAUH ENTHUSIASTS 

Looking for Outside 
Salespeople to sell 
personal body 
alarms. Excellent 
commissions. Will 
train, part time or 
full time. 

NETWORK 
CELLULAR 

(708) 566-5080 



BaHHHHHBHHHHHHHHHBHHHHB 

g HOUSEKEEPINC 3 

D Nursing Home a 

1^ No experience necessary 3 

l] Flexible hours, 1 week vacation after 1 year, a 



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Good Attendance Bonuses 

Apply In Person 

9 am-4 pm Mon.-Frl. 

Hillcrest Nursing Center 

1740 N. Circuit Dr. 
Round Lake Beacti, IL 60073 



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I CASHIERS/STOCK I 

I Sweeney's Footiworks seeks 

I full or part time 

i cashiers (must be 21) to work in our| 

z Lake Zurich convenience store/fue! | 

I station from 2 p.m. -midnight. Also| 

i seek stock help (must be 18) for these 1 

z hours. Flexibility for weekends prefer- x 

i able. ^ 

I Please stop in to fill out an application. 

I Group Medical/Paid Vacations. 

I SWEENEY'S FOODWORKS 

z Corner of Rt. 12 & Miller Rd., Lake Zurich 
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz 



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Uthjty Assistant 

Dexter Packaging Products is a leading 
global manufacturer of specialty packag- 
ing coatings and a major Division of a 
Fortune 500 Corporation. 

We are seeking a person to be responsi- 
ble for lab supply inventory and mainte- 
nance, lab clean-up and orderliness and 
general support to chemists. The posi- 
tion will also be responsible for some 
routine, hands-on laboratory effort 
under the direction of our staff chemists. 

High school diploma or GED required. 
High school chemistry and mathematics 
desirable. Will be trained in hazardous 
waste policies and safe laboratory prac- 
tice. 

Excellent communication/organization 
skills and the ability to do detailed work 
is important. 

We provide a competitive salary and 
benefits package. We're an Equal 
Opportunity Employer, and we provide a 
smoke-free environment. For considera- 
tion, please send a letter complete with 
references to: 

Dr. Ronald J. Wingender 
Dexter Packaging 
Products Division 
1 East Water Street 
Waukegan^IL 60085 




■^Vir^^i^Kf'Vj^!y\ K-**ff<*i^v^y,<^t^>>i'<^i^.t*t;>'^^/i*^*r.ti^ "'U»^Wft*^V|l 



MEDICAL. OPPORTUNITIES 



^^^^^Xr,S!^^>:iKStS■^.i■i■:,tif\■^irl^:!!^ft^'f,^:i^l'JX>fm» 



Expanding long 

term care facility 

located In Long 

Grove has need of 

a Full Time RN 

3-11 Shift 

Excellent benefits 

CompeUtlve Salary | 

Call Nancy 
1(708)438-82751 

M-F 9-5 

RN/unul 

Immediate Pari- ^ 
Time opening ^ 

1 1 :30 am - 8 pm ^ 
and Saturday 

Contact 

Sister Mary 

D.O.N. 

Mount ^ 
St. Joseph S 

(708) 438-5050^ 
Lake Zurich S 

Inactive or Retired^ 
^Nurses Welcome^ 



CNA'S 

Expanding 
skilled/intermediate 
care fadlity located 
in Long Grove has 

need of CNA's 
Good Benefits/Salary 
Call Suzy M-F 

(708) 438-8275 



BBHHHHHHBHHa 

P Imniedlalo ^ 
D ^ . , a 
Q Openmg lor q 

g RESIDENTIAL g 

ti SERVICE a 

B COORDINATOR 3 
j5 Full-Time position to P| 
work with mentally a 
retarded women. ^ 
ICF/DD a 



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E Please contact: a 



• 



! 



Check this 

Section Each 

Week!! 

Illlilllllllilllllllllllilliil 
Immediate 

openings for 

Direct 

Care 

Workers 

Weekend hours onty 

PartTtme 
Willing to train for 

positions 
Call Sister Arlene 

(708) 438-5050 

MOUNT ST. 

JOSEPH'S 

Lake Zurich 



n 

D 

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Cathy Metting 

Mount St. 

Joseph 

Lake Zuricli 

g (708) 438-50503 

Byyyyusyyyua 



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Expanding long 
term health 

care facility in 
Long Grove 
has need of 

REHAB 
AIDE 

Full Time 
CompetHh/e Salary 

Call Kathy 
(708) 438-8275 



SPEEGB 
PATB0L06IST 

Immediate full time 
opening to work 

with mentally 
retarded women. 

Contact: 
C^thy Metting 

Mount 

St. Joseph 

(708) 438-5050 
J Lake Zurich ^ 



IVurscs 

Ready for a change, 
long tcrni care facility 
in Round Lake Beach 
is ready for you. 
•Sign on bonus 
•Competitive 
wages 
•401k plan 
•Vacation pay 
•Good attendance 
bonus 
•Float pool 
Stop by today for 
more information 

Hillcrest 

1740 N. Circuit Dr. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 

60073 

(708) 546-5300 
Mrs. Lcmar 






, 



FrtdcrY.;Jun?/^,]f,^i,,l 



LaK^S!3Si^WRS'R9'A«i. J>S. 



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EMPLOYMENT 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



] 




Hdp Wanted 
Full-Tim e 



OUTSIDE 
SALES 

Looking for 
independent dynamic 
individuals to sell car 

phones, pagers & 
personal attack alamts. 

PART TIME OR 

FULLTIME 

We will train. 

Excellent 

Commissions 

CallPam 
(708) 566-5080 

n fr 



COOK 

Expanding nursing 
home located in 
Long Grove has 
need of an addition- 
al full time & part 
time cook. 
Therapeutic cooking 
experience helpful, 
but will train. 

Call Marta 
(708) 438-8275 



1 



Burger 
King 

is now hiring to fill 
positions on all 
shifts. Part time & 
full time available. 

Apply at 
20S. Rt. 12 
Fox Lake, IL 

Before 11 :00 AM 

and after 2:00 PM 

weekdays 



BANKING 

Part Time 

;tellers 

up 10 30 hours a we«k. 

Mlrvof 1 year 
exporlencB required. 

Competitive 

Hourly Rate 

' plus Vacation\^ 

Bonus V 

Contact Mr. Rosner 

1 HAWTHORN BANK 

P.O. Box 1029 

gUundaloIfi.lL 60060 

(706) S49-9000 



Pizxa 
HHut* 

EARN TOP DOLLARS 
WITH PIZZA HUT* DELIVERY 

We are now hiring Drivers for delivery in Round 
Lake Beach area. Valid driver's license, car, 
insurance, good driving record, and being 18 
years of age or older are required. 

•Flexible Hours •Benefits 

•Full & Part Time •Additional Positions Avail. 

Apply Within 

809 Rollins Rd., Round Lake Beach 

(708) 546-5406 

I PIZZA HUT* DEUVERY IS AN EQUAL EH.ff'LOYMENT OPPOflTUNrTY • WFAW 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Saltol 



I received an inicrcsting tclqihonc call a few wcclcj back from 
the head of personnel of a local corporation who had tried his 
luck at tiying to hire through the newspaper want ads. His idea 
was to have people send in their rcsunics. lie would then filter 
through ihcm lo decide which of those candidates would be 
bcncHcia] to meet and eligible lo inlcrvicw for the available 
position. What absolutely amazed him were not only the scores 
of resumes sent in, but the amount of resumes which were almost 
identical. As he put it, "I foci as though I am looking at clones 
from a bad sct-fl flick. Never before have I run across so many 
resumes with ihc ideniical objective, same formal and layout" 

I received his call for help when he said he realized the avenue 

he had chosen was not the way to go. After having ravaged 

through these piles of "canned resumes", the corporation made 

the decision to cast them aside with the fcchng that these 

individuals were not showing any sense of individuality. "The 

only difference after a while," he said, "were the names, dates and 

cmployas. How is an employer supposed to decide from clonesl" 

My answer to him was simple. Thai is why there arc employment 

soviccs such as ours who deviate tl)c time taken to filler through 

the paper work... choose a few good candidates who will meet the 

needs through careful screening and present only those 

candidates who we feci will mccl the rcjiuircments. The cmjiloyer 

then is more at case to meet with these irJividuals, make his own 

decision and ihc work is complete. If you arc looking to put 

together a resume and planning to do it yourself, libraries and 

bookstores have books with sample resumes. They arc great, but 

are not meant, to coj^ word for word objectives, and such. Put 

ciToit into your objective, as well your duties and fonnai. There 

are man^ print shops that will help you select a formal and 

typesetting with moderate charges. If you choose a resume 

service, be sure that you work close with the person setting this 

up so they do not create the person you arc not nor create a 

resume thai is a format ideniical to the last ten pccj)lc who left 

their office. There arc some job seekers out there with the belief 

thai if you print your resume on hot pink stationary, or go for the 

bizarre, that it will euraci more atlcnlion. Il may atiraci aticntion, 

however, it may nol be the type of atlcnlion a more conservative 

person would Jock al twice. Keep in mind that "less is n»rc". Go 

over your resume and make as many changes as you feel 

necessary unltl you are satisfied with the end product. Have 

someone else look it over. Bounce it off olhcrs and sec if il is 

you. Keep your formal conscrvalJve, not flamboyanl. And most 

irT5KirtanL..proofread your product before it goes to prinll 

Nolci Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional 

and President of Superior Personnel in Gumce. 

LeUas can be scnl lo Nan^' c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 




HelpWanled 
Full-Timo 



Help Wanidd 
Full-Time 



I 



Now Hiring 

RESTnaRHNTS 

OPENERS -Wwkdaya 
CASHIERS- Day & 

Night and Weclcondi 

KFC experience a plui! 
Slop in for ui implication: 

203 E. Suto Rd. 

liland Lake, IL 



RECEPTIONIST/ 

GENERAL OFFKE 

growing organiza- 
tion seel<s high 
energy outgoing 
individual. Data 
entry, typing, and 
loads of variety! 
(708)244-0016 



aoc 



zzn 



IN HOME CLOSERS 

Great Product 

"The Living Trust" 

AVERAGE COMMISSION 

MSS^/Salc 

• Training Program ♦ Organized Territory 

• Qualified Leads • Set your own schedule 

CALL DALE SMITH - 10 ann-4 p.m. M-F 
(708) 480-3400 

HNANCIAL ADMIMISTRATIVE SERVICES 

151 S. Pfingsten Rd., Unit C, Deerfleld, IL 60015 



•*•••*••****•• 



LAKE COUNTY FOREST 
PRESERVE DISTRICT 

SECRETARY II 

Team-oriented, fast paced office in 
nature preserve setting has full- 
time secretarial position for person 
with word processing skills to type, 
answer telephone and perform 
variety of general clerical tasks. 
Two years secretarial experience 
with ability to type 50 plus wpm. 
Word Perfect experience a plus. 
Starting salary: $18,945-$22,260 and 
excellent benefits. Applications are 
available at and must be returned 
byJunelS, 1993to: 
The Human Resources Dept. 
Lake County Forest Preserve District 
2000 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
Libertyville, IL 60048 
(708) 367-6640 

Equal Opportunily Employer 



REGIONAL 
SALES TRAINER 

The premier national sales skills and education 
company is expanding its sales staff in the 
Chicago area. We are seeking qualified indepen 
dent contractors to market our proven program 
for sales skills development to prospective 
clients in the greater metropolitan area. 
Qualified candidates should meet the 
following criteria: 

•Excellent public speaker 

•Very good professional image 

•Self starter 

•Strong work ethic 

•Proven track record of sales success 
If you have an entrepreneurial flair and would 
like to develop your career with an outstanding 
company, we provide excellent training. 
Compensation - Straight Commission • $50,000 ■ $85,000. 

Please send resume 

Attn: Jacqueline Lockhart 

6189 Heritage Lane 

Lisle, IL 60532 
or call 708-369-3710 

Women and minorities strongly urged to apply 




HelpWanled 
FuH-Tima 




:~ HelpWanledCJ 
Fult'Time 



SERVICE DIRECTORY 



ij; 



Lakeland Newspapers, Lake County's largest weekly 
newspaper group. Is seeking an Advertising Account 
Executive. The candidate will be responsible for field 
sales calls, developing a key area in Lake County 
and must possess excellent skills In interpersonal 
oommunlcation, creativity and personal responsibility. 
The carKSdate must also be self motivated and able 
to work with minimal amount of supervision, enjoy 
variety and be able to handle multiple tasks. An auto- 
mobile Is necessary (gas compensation will be 
made.) If you are professional, energetic and pos- 
sess sJI of the above characteristics we are interest- 
ed in talking to you. A candidate should have previ- 
ous sales experience. Please send resume or call: 

Jill DePasquale 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708) 2S3-8161 



CLERK III 

We have an opening in our 
Wauconda Environmonlal 
Heailh oflica for a lult-time 
Clfifk. Two years offios expe- 
rience, excoilent dericaJ skills 
and typing of 65 w.p.m. are 
required. Starting Salary 
Range: $17,277-$20,925. 
Contact Human Resources 
at (70B) 360-5959 (or an 
application and appointment 
for a typing test Lake County 
f^eallh Department, 3010 
Grand Avenue, Waukegan, 
IL 60085. Smoke-free envi- 
ronmenL EEOE. 




Child Care 




Business 
Opportunitifls 



RESTAURANT TO SERVE 
STEAKS, SEAFOOD, Chteken 
wllh Uquor LIconso available. 
4100sq,(!. For Sale or Lease lo 
e)q)erlenc8d operalor with sollor 
pailk:lpatlon. Good paikkig, good 
location. Cliestor. Illinois 616- 
826-2534. 

TANNING- ALISUN & WOLFF 
TANNING BEDS, New 
commorclal- home units. From 
3199,00. Lamps- Lotions- 
Accessories. Monthly payments 
k)W as $16.00. Call today Free 
new color catalog, 1/800-462- 
9197. 



ANNOUNCEMENT... 

• POSIM^JOBS^ 

$lL95/hourto 

start, plus bcncflls. 

Postal carriers, sorters, 

clerks, maintenance. 

For an application 

and exam 
Information, call 

1-219-736-4715 

Ext. P9509 
8 am - r pm, 7 days 




School/ 
Inst ruction 




Work Wanted 



LICENSED BEAUTIOAN ABLE 
to do hair in your Iwrno, Ask ror 
Irene (815)675-2693. 

WE CLEAN HOUSES, 520 (frst 
lime. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Please caJl July (708) 740-1723. 



CDL QUALIFIED IN 3-WEEKS. 
Weekend Training Available. 
Job placement assistance. Call 
NOW 1/800-332-7364. Diesel 
Driving School, Sun Prairie, Wl. 

COLLEGE FUNDING- OVER 
300,000 sources, Unique code 
matching system. No need 
Required. Guaranlood rosuls! For 
FREE Info and application wrile 
A.T.S.. BOX 173, ATTtCA, MI 
48412. 




Child Care 



CHILD CARE IN MY Pistakoe 
Highlands homo, roasonafofe 
rales, Infants wokomo, lots ol 
TLC. (708)497-4506. 

CHILDCARE IN MY Non- 
smoking Iwme, largo playroom, 
12/fnonth3 +up. Summer care 
avalabte (or sciiool ago chJklron. 
Tax deduclibk), full-time only. 
(708)587-4882. 

EXPERIENCED DAYCARE 
MOM has oponlngs In Round 
Lake Beach home, Inlants to 
ago 3, excellonl references, 
(706)740-0924. 

FUN ACTIVITIES AND LOTS 
OF TLCI Coltogo educated Mom 
will care lor your child, {usi off 
Grand Ave., Gurneo, 
(708)662^997. 

GRAYSLAKE MOM WILL 
BABYSfT IN my homo, daytlnw 
hours, starting July 12; ages 2-t-. 
(708) 223-1353. 

HAVE OPENINGS NOWl 
tJcef^sod, roltablo, norv-smoker. 
Meals/snacks provided. 
Grayslake, (Rle.BS and 
Washington). For Interview call 
(708) 548-2410. 



^ 



BUY IT. 
SELL IT. 
FiND IT.' 



CLASSIFIED 



u££HMMilMiMMM^U*MiM*MMMMM*l 




Carpentry 



FIREPLACE MANTELS- 
CUSTOM MADE: OAK, PINE, 
POPLAR, etc. REASONABLE. 
Call (708)223-5087 aak far 
John. 



sn 



Housekeeping 



HOUSECLEANINQ- WE WILL 
clean your Home to your 
spocKicatlons, Satisfaction 
guaiaitood. References provWed. 
Reasonable rates. Ask about 
our doaning gift certltteales and 
how you can obtain FREE 
clearing. Cal Andsa. (708)263- 
5244. 

HOUSECLEANING. f WILL dean 
your house OR apartment at 
reasor^le rates In CerttraJ Lake 
County area. References 
avallabte. Call Barb anytime 
(706)223-7401, 

WILL CLEAN YOUR home, 
condo, or apartment. Weekly or 
bl-woekty. Excoikint rateroncea. 
(708) 838-0648, 




Landscaping 



LICENSED TUTORING 
AVAILABLE In my Island Lake 
Home. All grades, most subjects, 
oper^ngs year 'round. Call (708) 
487-5006 for more Inlormatlon, 

LOVING BABYSITTER WITH 
many years experience has 
oponlngs. Big yard with tots of 
toys, snacks, hoi lunches. Have 
references. Please call (708) 
546-^604. 

MOM OF 2, in Round Lake 
Beach, has 1-openlng. Ouallly 
care, reasonable, ages over 
12/monlhs. (7QS) 740-2275. 

MONDAY MORNING MOM'S 
OFFERS Rollabto quality care for 
Infants- Preschooi""!, Insured 
monitored. (708) 49r-4MOM 
(4666), 

PRE-SCHOOL TEACHERfflK>M 
HAS chltdcaro openings In her 
Fox Lake homo. Meals Included. 
S-monlhs/up. Planned adlvHtes. 
Days and evenings. 
(708)973-1542. 

SITTER AVAILABLE. WILL 
watch your chlkJ full lime only. In 
my McHenry homo. Toys! Fenced 
yard. Meals Included. Flrst-akl 
and CPR knowledgable. For 
Wormalkxi, call Kathy, (815)344- 
7823. 

WILL DO BABYSrniNG for all 
ages, anytime. Also overnight 
and tiolklays. Creative adiytttos. 
Meals and snacks Included, 
(708)546-3718 or (708)740- 
4414. 



CLEAN-CUT 

LAWN SERVICES 

Lawnmowlng, landscap- 
ing, gutter cleaning, tree 
trimming, raking. 
Call Don Malzahn 
1524Meadowbrook 
Round Lake Beach 
(708) 740-9168 
■Quality At Affordable PricesI* 



MULCHES 

SIndika Oik $3(VCu. Yd. 

ShduUed Q: 6u S3(VOl Yd 

Stne<U«i Pino S3(VCtt. Yd. 

Qun Codir Oiha S3(VCu. Yd. 

Qun Otk Chipa S3(VCu. Yd. 

FREE DEUVERY 

o per yard lo spread 

Call: SURE GREEN 

(708) 483-9300 

(800)303-5150 



S23 



Moving' 
Storage 



MOVING?? CALL BOB The 
Mover. Furniture; pianos; safes; 
restaurant equipment; Light 
machinery, Llll gale van and 
small crane trucks, PACK RAT 
Enterprlaes. (706)662-1956. 




Professional 
Services 



MECHANICAL DRAFTING AND 
DESIGN. Drawing convorston, 
prolotype, and compkilo design 
sorvtoos. No job loo b\g or smalL 
7yrs. oxperienco. (708) 526-5764, 



BOOKKEEPING 
TYPIST 

Service avallabia tor iniall 
busineai, or on at needed 
baalB. Grayslake bated. 
Relerencas pfovldad, MN 
Hoppo Profeeuonal Service 

(708) 223-2263 



S45 



Trees/Plants 



TREE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Cleaiing 
Seasoned Hardwood 

Nordstrom Tree 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 
708-526-0858 




MARKET GUIDE 



■i^'seii-ji^'iff^'t^i^'M'^^ 




Antk)ues 




Bazaars/Crafts 



(3)AMUr.EMENT PARK 
TRAINS, will tit In backyard. All 
come with passenger cars and 
track. S8.000. $7,000, 56,500 
or trade lor Antique Car. 
(708)396-3375. 

BEDROOM SET, 7-DRAWER 
dresser with minor. 4-drawor 
chosi dresser, bookcase 
headboard, excoilent condillon, 
S650. (early 1960's), (414)694- 
5979. 




Appliances 



APPROXIMATELY 5,000 
CERAMIC MOLDS, must sell, 
S1,500 or best oiler. (414) 
677-9517 loavo mossago. 

WOOD WORK SHOP. 
Everything you need (or your 
own business and customers 
thai tKjy direct Irom you. Includes 
Bl loots, plans, and tots of linishod 
products ready lor store sak). 
The rest Is up lo you. Excoilent 
(or garage or largo workshop, 
S3,700toosJ oflor, (708) 546-^208. 



FRIDGEDARE, WHITE 
REFRIGERATOR, excellent 
ooodlton, ijpf*gf<. 3250. WICKER 
ROCKING chair, $20, Call Val. 
(708)559- 0777. 

MAYTAG GAS DRYER, gold. 
vwMks gfBal. $75. (708) 587-3430. 




Business/OflJce 
Equipment 



APPLE It GS COMPUTER. Cdof 
monitor, Imago Writer II printer. 
l.2mog onboard, 2-3.5 drives 
2*5.25drlvos; soKwaro valued 
SI ,000. Ported condlton. asking 
$1.400/all. (708) 587-6008. 



36 Lakeland Newspapers 



Friday. June 4. 1993 



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MARKET GUIDE 




Business/Office 
Equipment 



Jt»>'<iKKi^4,' 




BUSINESS SUPPLIES. 

COMPUTERS and sollware (or 
the home, ofllce. Voice mall, 
voice messaging, tMokkaepIng, 
tax preparation, elc. 30-f 
appllcallons. For llleraluro and 
domo disks call COMPUTER 
BUSINESS SERVICES al 1/BOO- 
343-8014. ext.1006. 

LASER FACtSIMILE MACHINE. 
Shaip 3300, Plain Papor FAX 
machine. Top quality laser 
provides camera-ready, 
roproduceable copy that 
automatically reduces/enlarges. 
Periect tor graphics, forms, 
Indopth detailed proposals. . lyr 
old, mini, wNh ail BELLS and 
WHISTLES, Will sell for SaoO; 
(Retail 52,200.) Call Stiaron or 
Bob at (708)223-8161. 

VOICE MAIL SYSTEM. 'Iport 
with manuals. New! $3,000. For 
more details, AsK lor Jim. 
(708)548-1600. 

■aaaaaaaaaBH 
g SAVE TIME g 
a SAVE MONEY! a 

g Laser FBCslmlld Machine 3 
g S)»rp33(}0Ptatn Paper g 
^Perfect for the small ^ 
^business owner org 
g heavier home use. One g 
gyear old. Mint condi-Q| 
gtion. Gnawing business g 
Ql needs larger uniL g 

B$800 or best offer. Q 
a Call Sharon or Bob a 

g (708) 223-8161 g 

■aaaaaaaaaaa 




Etectrontca/ 
Computers 



TELEPHONE SYSTEM- 
TniLLlUM Pantt>er 1032. Gives 
print-out of dally call activity. 
Includos 4-phone3, printer, Mefco 
monitoring unit. S2,300 Call 
(706)526-5C33, toave message. 




Farm Guide 



WANTED: CUTTEfl DECK FOR 
MONTGOMERY WARDS or 
GIBSON Garden Tractor, 1969 
thm 1976. (708) 395-5591. 




1^ Garage/ 
Rummage Sales 



Garage/ 
Rummage Sales 



YARD SALE- SAT. JUNE 5, 
dam-2pm; furniture, dishes, 
exercise equipment, mattress, 
and loj3 MOREI 708 McKlnley 
Ave, Lbertyvitlo, off Dawes Rd. 



BIO 

RUMMAGE SALE 

6/) I A 6/12, 9 am to 4 pm 

Shepherd of the Lakes 
Church 

285tWb**ig1on,Gfayslake 




Horses & 
Tack 



BLACK AND WHITE 4yr old 
mare, 13. 1H, broke to ride, 
another English and Western 
t»tse also. For furltwr Irf ormallon: 
(414)654^251 or (414)539-2160. 

THOROUGHBEO GELDING 
AND Arabian mare, S850/each 
or best, excellent trail horses. 
(615)923-4901. 

TRAILER WANTED: HORSE 
or Slock. Bumper or Gooseneck. 
Any condition. Also looking lor 
Trail Horse. CASHI (414) 
593-^048. 




Households/ 
FumHure 



2-FAMILY YARD SALE. Sal. 
Jkjoo 5, 9aJTv3pm. 536-538 Qoall 
Creek Dr.. Grayslake. Easy 
access via Zlogtof Rd. Irom either 
Rte.S3 or Center St. Fumlture, 
1991 Konmore washer/dryer, 
dolhes- monAfVomens, kitchen 
wares, books, TV's, window air 
conditioner, 1982 BUICK- AS 
IS! 

3-FAMtLY SALE! UPRIGHT 
Coldspot Iroozer, Konmoro 
wasttor (heavy duty), arxl ek>ctrV: 
dryer, paslel tweed couch arxl 
chaise, (2)vldeo cameras, 
Bentwood rocker, and stool, 
seVSSIncii brass oofloo tabia vAh 
thick glass-top. wooden Infant 
cradto, (liko now). Now playpen, 
chlldrens/Womon's clothes, 
• rolterskates. Now fiberglass 
balh/tub unit, (2)wlndow air 
conditioners, portable window 
tans, yard toc^, Soars etodrtc start 
lawn mower, wllh extended 
warranty til '94. 130 W.ELLIS 
AVE.. LIBERTYVILLE, l-block 
south of WIndchestor, West skJe 
of Mlfwaukoe Ave., Behind 
Goodyear Tiro. SAT. AND 
SUNDAY, JUNE 5.6 9-4pm. 

AFTER YOUR BIQ Sale, and 
you still have things that Just 
did not go.... Call LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run It under 
the "FREE/Glvoaways" soctton, 
at No Chargel (708) 223-B161. 

4-FAMILY SALEI FRIDAY 1- 
5pm.; SAT. AND SUNDAY Oam- 
5pm. Benjamin Ave. (off Rollins 
and WIson Rds.) IngtosMe. Lots 
of designer cloilws, fumlture, 
tools, glassware, MISC. 

LOTS OF CLOTHES. Women's 
sizes 0,1 ,1 2; Mo ns size 38 suit , 
sweaters, humidifier, kerosene 
healer, sW bools (size 8). FRI. 
JUNE 4lh 9-1 pm, SAT. 9am- 
1pm. 

PLANT/RECYCLED 
TREASURES- WALL mounted 
bar, upholstered chairs, maple 
doubki bod with mattress, njgs, 
runner, musical inslrumonis, 
encydopodla-ct^drens and olhcr 
books, paintings, household 
items, bedding, clothing, and 
ALOT MOREIGARDEN AND 
KOUSEPLANTS. Plus Strudei, 
cider, and Honey. Zloglors 
Ordiards on Bacon Rd,, South 
of R1.120 between Falrf told and 
Codar Lake Rtls. (708) 546-1228. 
EVERY SAT. & SUN. 9am- 
5pm until end of June. 




Househokia/ 
Fumilure 




Lawn/Garden/ 




QUEENSIZE SOFA SLEEPER 
and matching k)vsseal, tweed 
fabric In earthtones, excellent 
conditton, $350^1 or best offer. 
(708)949-6716. 

RESTORED FURNITURE! 

SOLD Mahogary 3-ckawer chest, 

$350. . 

♦ ♦ ♦ » ♦ 

Mahagoriy bectoom seL included 

Sdrawer chest, 9-drawer dnesser - 

and matching minor, $700. 

Antique solid mahagany twin 

bed with headboard/footboard 

and solid side raits, $300. 

(708)223-1763. 




Lawn/Garden 



JACOBSEN, 15HP RIDING 
tractor with wagon and snow 
plow. $1,200 (708) 395-7489. 

I Grand Opening! 

HERBS 

Herbs to You by 

Betz & Crew 

SaLJtineS, 11-4 pm 

Polled Culinary Herbs 

19239 Grand 

Lake Villa 

(1/4 mi west of Rle. 45) 

Wetlands Herb Fann 
(708) 356-6304 







LRRGCSFimiG NURSERY STOCK 

AUCTION 

Sot. Junes, 11AM 

Adam Fritz Co. 
24838 N. Old McHenry Road 

(3 mites E. of Rle. 12), Lake Zurich 

Fresh dug Northern Trees, Shmbs & 

Evergreens. Poned/B.&B. Ready to 

load. Full Catalog Sale Day, 

For more Information 

(708) 438-5101 




Miscellaneous 



MOVINQI BEST OFFERI 
BEAUTIFUL .SOLID OAK 
ARMOtR, Musi Got Has light 
inskto double door cabinet. Very 
good condtlktn. First $250 lakes 
It away. 2/Draws top and twttom, 
a>90paraje conpajtmerls. Modem 
styling. Call (708)740-2789 alter 
4pm or leave message. 

2-PIECE TEAK STEREO 

CABINET, wllh stereo, good 
condition, S200 or best offer. 
(708)223-1673. 

7/PlECE WALNUT DINING room 
set, S300; Kingstzo box spfing and 
mattress, wllh (2)nlghlsland3, 
$125; (2)drBssors, 1/with minor. 
$150. (815) 344-5646. 

AIR CONDITIONERS, 
$100/EACH. Nice sizes, work 
well. Round Lake, (708)546- 
3398. 

BEST DEAL AROUNDI 
MOVNGI Overstuff od styte couch 
and chair with ottoman, soli 
Taupe color, Exceltor* condillon. 
Rrst $400 lakes It. (708) 740- 
2789, leave message or call 
eves. 

QUEEN-SIZE MATTRESS AND 
box spring, brand new, never 
used. $260. Brass Queen 
headfoolboard $ 1 90. DELIVERY 
AVAILABLE. (708)374-0203. 

COUCH AND LOVESEAT, 
Fashionable beige print, has 
makhing thfow plows. S300t}esL 
Other misc. furniture. (Brown 
Laz-E-Boy; wtile plush chair); call 
aller 5pm (708) 526-0599. 

COUCHES, COLOR TV'S 
stereos, microwaves, waleibeds, 
MUST SELL! (414) 654-4171. 

DINING ROOM, QUEEN Anno, 
Exquisite Chorrywood, 9-ptece, 
Period $1,995. Server available. 
Never Used, kitchen table/sot 
white tile top, ,36x60. Podoct, 
$295. (706}374-0203. 

EASY CHAIR, SOFA, and 
Lovosoal, Blue, mauve, and 
cream. Excellent conditton, must 
sell. $550. (708)855-9047. 

FOR SALE- LOVESEAT, light 
blue, oxcoltont condition, $200. 
(708)735-81 T4. toave message. 

GIRLS BIKE, S30; TV/IN Bod 
$25; celling fan $25; watertMd 
heater, excellent, $40; Amana 
Micmwa\/o sis $45; Bassctt MorVs 
tall dresser (2) w/nlghl stand, 
$90. (708) 356-0958. 

PK>NEER LARGE SCREEN TV. 
model SD-P40 (40" screen) 
$700^>o^ oiler. (7O0) 548-2004. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bedroom, 
complete $1,100 Dining room 
sel, $1 .700 Cherry. All In period 
conditton. Must Solll (708)855- 
0611. 

SOFA, FLEXSTEEL, SCINCH, 
soil while, $525. Excellent 
condillon, like new. (414)694- 
5979. 

WROUGHT IRON DINING room 
set with taave and 4/chalr3. and 
matching chandelier, $150. 
(708)689-4524 botoro 2pm or 
alter 8;30pm. 

PEACH 'L'-SHAPE COUCH 

wllh queen sloepor. Dost offer. 

.411. Nalural wood dining sol. wlh 

teavo. Best oflor (708) 356-7331 . 



"•BIG STUFF"' MOVINGI 
MUST Sem Salellle dish setup 
.7(1.; Will sacrifice, $400; 1st 
caller takes II! Epson Copy 
macNno, enlarges and reduces, 
new drum, 2/1 rays, $150; Unkx> 
Fk)or Butler 17lnch; $200; AMF 
Bowling Ball drilling equipment; 
$5,000 worth of equipment. Is! 
caller takes all for $300; Snap- 
On aJrrachet with 3/8' (tlve; still 
boxed, never used, paid over 
$300. will sell $100; Victor 
Acetylene torch with gauges, 
great shape, $200. Brand new 
GMC 8ft. Pickup beds, wllh 
bumpers, $550/eachI ONLY 2- 
LEFTI Call MIko, pager 
«(70a)61 2-9557 leave your 
number for return call or call 
evenings (708)213-0770. 

1987 TOVOTA CAMRY LE, 
$5,000. Exoelent oondlkHi, 1987 
Mazda ptekup, $4,000; SONY 
27lnch color TV, $425. (708) 
24&-07a8. 

1992 ENCYCLOPEDIA SET, 
Me^ BrarxJ. lop quality, now, In- 
box, originally $1 ,200 Must Sell 
$295. Call belore 5pm. 
(708)860-0585. 

APPROXIMATELY 100FT. OF 
Chain Link lence. vrtth all poles, 
lop ral, gale' and hardware. $225. 
GE Washer $50 Runs good. 
(708)623-^941. 

BABY STROLLER S10; Honda 
Passport street Bike, excollent 
conditton, like now, $400/Offer. 
(706)740-8418 callalter 3:30pm. 

BLACK HILLS GOLD 
JEWELRY. SAVINGS! 264%. 
FREE Fil Color Calakjg, lealuring 
over 450 Hems. Write: La Fave 
Ud. 24009 Lotus Dr., Karcasvile. 
Wl 53139. 

FOR SAL£- PANASONIC 'Hard 
Pack* Cellular phone. Includes 
Ballery pack, charger, lighter 
adaptor, and external antenna. 
Good condition, over $2,000 
now, $175. 9a!l Ra^ph (708)390- 
8050 X667 or (708)546-5609. 

GOT A CAMPGROUND 
Merriwfship or Tlmeshaie? Well 
lake It Amertoa's Most sucossf u1 
reisoit resato clearinghouse. Cal 
Resod Sales Irilonnatton loll tree 
Hotline. 1/800-423-5967. 

LASER FAC1S1M1LE MACHINE. 
Sharp 3300, plain paper F/VX 
machine. Top quality laser 
provides camera-ready, 
roproduceable copy that 
automaltoalty reduces/enlarges. 
Ported for graphics, forms, 
Indepthdelalted proposals, . lyr 
old, mint, with all BELLS and 
WHISTLES, WUI sell tor $800. 
(Retail $2,200.) Call Sharon or 
Bob at (708) 223-6161. 

MINI TRAMPOLINE GOOD 
CONDITION, $15.00 (708)740- 
8416 alter 3:3Qpm. 

MUGGED BY MR. 

BADWRENCH? ANGRY OVER 
ALTTOMOBILE SERVICE WORK 
AT YOUR DEALERSHIP or 
AUTO REPAIR SHOP? Aulo 
Repair Horror Stories? Now 
There's HELPI Auto Repair R|p- 
Ofls Exposed. For more details 
wrile to: Pombroko-Couti Co., 
Box 158, higtiland Paik. L 60035. 

SEWING MACHINE SERVICE- 
- All Makes and Models. 40yts. 
Exportonoo. Cal (708) 526-6551. 



Friday, June 4, 1993 




Miscellaneous 



PROM DRESS- SIZE 7, 
Turquoise strapless full length, 
$50; 18tt. round pool v»ith new 
oxpandabto nner, ladder, winter 
cover, and more S300; 
RefrkJgefalw, goW 21 .8c.n. side- 
by-slde. $100; Nintendo with 
S/games $100 or best olfer. 
Tandy computer TSR80 $26. 
Black and white 13lnchTV$20. 
2/black traverse rods l-IHs 64 - 
120inch window, l-fl3 48-54lnch 
window, $25/bolh. Mirror for 
dresser and hutch for dresser, 
$5.00 (708)546-4707. 

WROUGHT IRON DINING room 
sel vrtth leave and 4/chalrs, and 
matching chandelier, S150. 
(708)689-4524 belore 2pr.i or 
after 8:30pm. 




Musical 
Inslmments 




Pets & Supplies 



Pets & Supplies 




Wanted To Buy 




Wanted To Buy 




GREAT DANE PUPPIES, 2 

Kens, top quaOy, btack, fawi, and 
brlncfle. AKC, shots, wormed,, 
champton lines (414)248-2597 
anor 5pm. ask for Sandy. 

FOR SALE- MALE And Female 
pifpbs. Cal for more infonnatkxL 
(414) 657-6334 

GERMAN SHORTHAIREO 
POINTER Puppies. AKC, 
Champton bk)0<llnes, first stcts. 
(708) 433-0796 (708)433^240. 

POMERANIANS, ADORABLE 
MALE and females. Ready lor 
new famles. Cream color, pepecB, 
$400. (708) 888-0532. 

PROF^SIONAL BIRD TAMNG 
AND TRAINING. ALSO BUY, 
SELL, or TRADE ANY TYPE 
OF BIRDS ind CAGES. Call 
■Urn (70a)74(M7S8. 



LOOMNQ FOR REASONABLY 

priced 4-wheeter/dif1 BIKE, that 
you/I would feel safe letting a 
e-10^.old ride on Farm land, 
(backyard). Under $200. Call 
alter 5:30pm (708)949-0415. 

FIXERS WANTED: NEW Rehab 

Flrni can pay cash (or 2 or 3- 
. bectoom homes tn Chain OLakas 
area In need o( repair. Any 
condftton consklered. Must be 
able to produce dear title. Call 
(706)740-4051 to lind out about 
easy aoqublton plan. 

WANTED- WANTED- WANTED: 
COPY OF 1993 ATLANTIC 
li^AGAZlNE. Can (708)634-3025. 

WANTED: MOPED TO Get 
around locally. Musi be 
mechanically sound. Call 
(414)654-9442, leave message 
and hours to return your call 



m^m 



PIANOS: ANY CONDmON. No 

ohj uprights over 49-lnches tali. 
No organs please. Qutok cashi 
(414)246-^91. 

SLOT MACHINES, JUKE 
BOXES, MUSIC BOXES, 
NkiOQlodson and Coke Machines 
wanted or related parts, any 
condillon. CASHI CalL 
(708)985-2742 01 vwlte Frank 
2yBr«rt, PJOJBok S*? Wealmort, 
IL 60559. 

WANTED TO RENTORSHARa 

Sman country home wllh fenced 
yard and garage for mature 
professional with 3/qi^t outdoor 
show dogs and small cal. 
Excellent references. 

(414)678-0156. 



-•FA^-^MivA''f ;*«»»r'^«*<: .*-^yfc.Tft*-j'i*:*a-**'*^^^V*>^^>-^ ■ '.^*»f-iv^ " ^^^.' 







%iS«p.'y^'^rei^>ne»iJK?»Aili:^->iittf!i ri*/»'»^KiS^-.-i*y«-/i^j-,<i7.«if-ewrsri''^itsV^^ 




FOR SALE- CLVRINET, GOOD 
CONOrriON, $31 X} or BecJ Ofler. 
(708)223-1823. 

GUITARISTS. BASSISTS. 
DRUMMERS, tnterestod In 
starting a band, call (708)548- 
2891. 

ORGAN- WURLITZER, 3- 
KEYBOARDS, needs minor 
repairs, $350/bost oiler (414) 
654-7797. 



AKC DALMATION PUPPIES 
AND lyr okl (ornate, shots and 
hearing tested. $250/each. Call 
(708) 689-1074. 

AMERICAN ESKIMO PUPS. 
TAKING ORDERS NOW bom 
5/23/93. (4)Beautlful pure white 
puppies to choose from. All 
raised In loving family 
enviromenl. Parents on 
premises, $275/eB. Purebred 
with papers. Knee-hi sized 
fully grown. Excellent family 
dogs, great wHh kids and other 
pets. Order early and watch 
your puppy grow and become 
familiar wllh you and your 
family. Ready to Go home July 
1Bth to loving homes oniyi 
(708) 223-8161 ext.llOdays. 
or (708)949-041 5, after 5:30pm. 

BETTER THAN A Kennoll 
DEPENDABLE and MATURE 
ADULTS will care lor your 
DOG/Pup while you're on 
vacation. Make reservations 
early) Tender loving care and 
altenlton In our home, Fenced 
yard. Must bo able to get along 
wllh other swoelheart(dog) 
residents. Relorencos and 
Reasonable. Call anytime 
(708)966-0319 Ftoronce. 

COCKATIELS- HAND FED baby 
Cockatlels, grays, pearls and 
Lullno's. For more kia call: (708) 
546-0519. 

GREAT PYRANESE. PUPPY 
6-morths oW. Housebfoken, dog 
house Induded. (708) 548-2891 . 

WHAT'S SO DIFFERENT 
ABOUT THE HAPPY JACK 3-X 
FLEA COLLAR? 11 Works. 
Coftains f*0 syrtfwtic pyrolhroids! 
Al loed and Hardware stores 
ovorywtwre andTSC STORES. 

LAB PUPS- AKC, OFA. black, 
dowctaws removed, Champton 
btoodllnos, hurting background, 
$350/oach. (815) 56&-5394. 




Homes For Sate 




|H Homes For Sale 



A GREAT DEALf S-Bedroom, 2- 
bath, vinyl sJdod raiKh. Stove, 
dlshwaslwr, relrlgeralor. lawn 
mower, Beach Park schools, 
great mighborhood. $106,000 
(708) 872-3936. 

MUST SELLII AFFORDABLE 
WATERFRONT In Spr*ig Grove. 
2-bedroom8, huge master 
bedroom. This house has tieen 
remodeled from lop to tiottom, 
Inskle arxl out. BeautltuI stone 
llreplace In oak trimmed living 
room. Cedar dining room has 
large bay window. Kitchen has 
oak cabinets and trkn. Quarry tlto 
floor and ceramic tile counter 
lop, breakfast nook and stained 
glass doors to laundry room. 
Shed, 3-decks with 75ft. of pier. 
S125.000, (708)567-0903. 

ALL STEEL BUILDING,- 

FACTORY UQUIDATION. Must 
sell 6-buiIdlngs. 24x34; 30x40; 
40X60; 42x80; 47x100; 50x150. 
Ideal for multi-uses. Save up to 
42%. Summer/Fall f^eliveiy. For 
more Intormallon call DMG 
Mortgage. 1/800-536-9191 . 

BUILD YOUR OWN HOMEI 
Miles provUes materials with r» 
down payment arxl bekiw tnarloet 
construclton financing. Start to 
finish assistance. Miles Homes. 
1/600-343-2884. 

BY OWNER! 3-BEDROOM, 
Cape Cod, large deck and yard, 
Ideal for a lamlly. $75,000 (708) 
546-6159. 

BY OWNER: $179,900 
EMERALD ESTATES. Ingfesde, 
3-bedroom,2-bath, landscaped 
acre, pool, sauna. SELLERS 
ANXIOUSI (708)587-3360. 

JACUZZI AND FIREPLACEIl- 
CRYSTAL LAKE Olfers this 
4bedroom, 2-story home on full 
aae. Deluxe Brick and cedar 
w/English basement. 3-car 
garage, oertral air, energy efficieni 
2x6 exterior wails, Many 
upgrades. Call fordelails- See 
house now... al under 
construction pricing. A 
BARGAIN at $235,000. Deal 
direct Irom Bulldart (708) 
526-8306. 

TWIN LAKES, WISCONSIN. - 
LARGE Raised Ranch, JUST 
3-mlte3 north ol Illinois border. 
Fk'Gplace, oenlral air, waler rights. 
Buy Irom Builder and SAVE. 
$128,900. Possible Rent/Buy 
opt^n. (708)526-5306. 

WAUKEGAN 2-BEDROOM 
CAPE Cod, dining room, study, 
lireplace, lul basemort, $66,000 
or rent $700/monlh. (708) 
395-8961. 

LINDENHURST- 3-BEDROOM 
RANCH in super location, 
separate dining room, a stone 
llreplace and beamed colling 
enhances Ihe massive rec room 
(30x26). large eal-ln kitchen, all 
NEW windovre througlwul, NEW 
lighting and celling lans In 
overyroom, all on an oversized, 
nicely landscaped lot. 2-l/2car 
attached garage, Yours for ONLY 
$129,500. Call for viewing, 
(708)265-0443/ owner. 



OPEN HOUSE 



FOR SALE BY OWNER. OPEN 
HOUSE l-4pm 522 E. Lberly, 
Wauconda, 3-bodroom txick and 
cedar ranch. New rool, new 
carpet, new waler heater, vaulod 
ceilings, woodbumlng fireplace, 
lake view. Beach rights, 27x14 
family room wllh sikJers toading 
lo patio ovoriooking pond. All 
this within walking distance lo 
town. Must see $114,900. Call 
(708) 526-6626. . 




|V Homes For Sale 



KILDEER- 

S^EDROOM ALL BRICK ranch 
set on wooded 1 -acre loL Uving 
room, dining room and master 
bedroom have panaramk: view 
of woods. Family room with 
fireplace, den/office, 2-balh8, 
2-car garage. Large deck 
surrounded by trees. Bright 
sunny home, perfect for 
entertaining. By Owner at 
$319,000. (708) 726-0429. 

LINDENHURST- 3-BEDROOM 
RANCH in super location, 
separalo dining room, a stone 
fireplace enhances tho massive 
rec room (30x26), laige eal-ln 
kitchen, all NEW windows 
throughout, NEW lighting and 
phone connecttons In everyroom, 
ail on an oversized, nicely 
iarxiscaped tot 2-1/2car attached 
garage. Yours lor ONLY 
$129,500. Call tor viewing, 
(708)265-0443/ owner. 

LINDENHURST- BRICK 
COTTAGE, $185,000 6-rooms, 
near lake, schools and shopping, 
(708)265-1510. 

MORTGAGES- REFINANCE 
FIRST or Second Mortgage or 
Obtain home equity loan with 
rates as low as 4.5% on a lyr 
adjustable, exceptional fixed 
rates lor good or slow credit. 
For more Imlormallon call DMG 
MORTGAGE AT 1/800-536- 
9191. 

MUNDELEIN- REMODELED 
RANCH, 2Ajedrooms, 2 balh, 
fireplace, central air, 2-1/2 car 
garage. Lois of extras. $104,900. 
(708) 566-8819/ owner. 

MUNDELEIN: BY OWNER, 437 
N. Fairlawn, Renxxleled raised 
ranch, 4-bedroom, 1 .Sbalh. 
allached garage, new roof, 
(umaco, and central air. Close 
sooa $132.900. (708) 566-5295. 

NORTH CHICAGO- 

BEAUTIFULLY remodtod largo 
4-bedrDom brick, full basement. 
Contract sato avalable. $77,500. 
(708) 223-5635/Qwn6r. 

RENT/OPTION TO BUY! 3- 
bedroom ranch on crawl, built 
1990, McHonry/Lakemoor. 
AitachExl garage, many upgrade. 
No pels. $895/monlh. 
$99,900/purchase. (708) 
526-6306. 

GIJRNEE BY OWNER. 
Immaculale homo, 4-t)edr(X)ms, 
3-baths, lormal living and dining 
room, eal-ln kichen, famiV room 
with fireplace, full basement, 2- 
1/2car garage. Asking $179^00 
Must see lo appredato. (708) 
263-6623. 

ROUND LAKE PARKl TOTALLY 
remodeled with carpeting, 3- 
bedroom, 1-1/2balh Capo Cod on 
doubto tot, lenced yard, garage, 
rxjar Beach, train, shopping, and 
schools, $105,900. (708) 
256M118 eves or (708)546- 
3006, days. 

INGLESIDE- PERFECT 
STARTER HOME, 2-bodroom. 
full basomeni, new roof, kJichen, 
balh and carpet, nkx rw^hbors. 
$74,500.(815)344-1973. 



SILVER LAKE, WI. By Owner 
Almost new, 3-bedroom, 
1 500sq.ft. + 1 .SOOsqit. finished 
basement, l-3/4balh, 

dshwasher , rafrlgefator, Jem- A*- 
rar^, natural gas heal, central 
aJr, dty sewer, 2-l/2car garage, 
and 24tt. pool. $145,900. Extra 
lot avallabii. Phone John 

(414)B78-?304. 

FOR SALE- STEEL BUILDING 
CLOSEOUT! 30x40x10 was 
$5,922; Just $4,935. 40x60x12, 
regular $9,028, only $7,524. 
50x75x14 originally $13,185, 
sacriftoe, $10,988. Olbor sizes 
avaBabte. Very limited quarities. 
BQO/766-4790. 

GURNEE. EXECUTIVE 
TOWNHOME. End unit, 2- 
bedroom, 1-l/2balh, den with 
gas llreplace, 2-car garage. 
Private entrance, all appllarv:es 
and window treatments- new. 
Very dean. Lots ol open space. 
$99,600. Call Stuart (708)402- 
5107 or eves (708) 855-0228. 



GOVERNMENT 
HOMES from SI (U 
repair). Delinquent tax 
property. Repossessions. 
Your area (1) 805-962- 
8000 Ext. GH-4458 for 
current rcpo list 



Illinois, Marengo 

34 acres w/4BR, 2 1/2BA. 
CAC, quality built home, 
2 l/2car ait garage. 2 
metal bldgs. Possible to 
divide, 4000 apple trees. 
Pierce Realty 

815-568-5252 



Wildwood/ 
Gages Lake 

sparkling new kitchen & 
Huge yard 



baths. 



Walk 



to parks, lake, beach, 
and gotf. $119,500. 

Call Lois 

Baiid & Wamer 

(708) 295-1855 or 
(708) 570-6803 



NEW 
CONSTRUCTION 

J new homes in 
Fox Lake 

•Cipe Cod • 2 bedroom, 1 
b«th, 1 car garage, 2nd (loot 
unfinished with balh rough- 
in, SI 18,900 

•2 itory - 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 
balh, 2 car garage, $136,900 

•Cape Cod - 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 
balh, family room, garden 
tub, 2 car garage, $142,900 

All homes have full 

basements, patios, city 

sewer and water, curb 

and gutter. Call 

BUSCHMAN 

COMPANIES 

(708) 265-0230 



OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY, 1- 
4pm. 3-bedroom Tri-Level. 1- 
1/2 balh, lenced yard, 2-l/2car 
garage, w/door opener, newly 
carpeted/ window troalments, 
al ^jp^iances stay. AND MORE, 
1819 Maplewood Dr., 
Llnd«nhur8t. $132,500. (708) 
3S6-2410/owner. 




ICD 



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Qj.Jga],JSQ 



Conlact Your 

Classified Account 

Excculivc al 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whiincy 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708)223-8161 



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Lakeland Newspapers 37 

, 1 »f|ii(|t ^ c*- i<(,t l'<; t'J <l 



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Homes 
For RenI 




Homes 
Fof Flent 



HEATHER RIDGE, GURNEE, 
TOWNHOME- 2-bebroom, Plus 
lolt, 2-baths, llreplaco, garage. 
Neutral decor, washer and dryer 
Included. Pool and tennte. Greal 
locallon. Available NOW 
' $9G(Vlmon(h or purchase optloa 
BROKER. (708)634-B311. 

ANTIOCH, 3-BEDROOM, 
BASEMENT, garage, A/C. prtvala 
pier on Lake Marie, no dogs. 
AvaJlable Augus* 1st. STStWnonlh, 
lyr. lease. (708) 395-1636. 

EMPLOYED FULL-TIME MOM 
of 2,seelc5 house or large duplex. 
Preferably Round Lake area 
schools, (current Homeowner) 
In tho $60Q/monlh "range", Rental 
or Owner llnanced at renl/buy 
option, etc. Possession end ol 
June/July 15lh? 3-bedroom, or 
2-bG<ix)om, possble 11 basement 
or den. Would approdale keeping 
smaller pooch (spanlel-slzed) 
house broken and welHsebaved. 
Please Call (708)740-2789. Can 
call alternate day phone, 
(708)966-6319. 

FOR RENT- SMALL House in 
Forest Lake, $600/month No 
pels. (708)255-0719. 

FOX LAKE- 4-BEDROOM 3- 
t>ath home, central air, (ult 
basement, water rights, 
S975/monlh. +utl1llie3. (708) 
740-7653. 

GRAYSLAKE- AVAILABLE 
JULY 1st. 2-bedroom house. 
. garage, alt appliances, air 
conditioning. S75a/month. (708) 
223-0171. 

GURNEE DUPLEX, 3- 
BEDROOM, 3875/morth. garage, 
basement, yard, washer/dryer 
hookups. CENTRAL AIR. deck. 
(708) 623-7519. 

GURNEE- 2-BEDROOM 
RANCH, 1-1/2baths. newiy 
rerTKXleied kichen. 1 -car garage, 
on large tot. 5795/monlh. (708) 
255-6531 or(70a)577-7a01. 

GURNEE. EXECUTIVE 
TOWNHOME. End unit, 2- 
bedroom, l-1/2balh, den with 
gas fireplace, 2-car garage. 
Private entrance, all appliances 
and window treatments- new. 
Very dean. Lots ol open space. 
Tennis and fishing. $925/monlh 
Year tease. Cal Stuart (708)402- 
- 5107 or eves (708) 855-0228. 

VERNON HILLS CONDO- New 
Century Town, 3bedroom, 2- 
bath, nreplace, complete kitchen 
with upgraded appliances. Iving- 
room, dlning-oom, laurxky-room, 
all proles5k)nally decorated with 
full upgrades, central aJr, garage, 
pool/tennb, pallo, 3g75/month 
(708) 304-1307. 

WAUCONDA, WALK TO 
everything, oertraJ air, 1 -bedroom 
house. 1-bath, appliances, 
$495/rent $495-socurily. Call 
George (708) 526-5000, leave 
message 



»■ 



:|i 



SILVER LAKE, KENOSHA 
COUNTY, Wise. Like new 3- 
bcdroom, 2-bath, dishwasher. 
Carpeted rec room, central ah, 
swIfTiiTing pool, large 2-car garage 
with paved drivoway. 
Sl,400/month, Security and last 
months rent required. (414) 
878-3304. 

TWIN LAKES, Wl, 3-or 4- 
bedroom, 2-story with 
1/2basemeni. large yard. Rent 
$495/month. Good referoncos, 
available. July 1st. Call (708) 
3B7-074S or (708)795-0055. 

VERNON HILLS 2-BEDROOM 
townhome, basement, l-1/2car 
garage, central air. al applances. 
washer/dryer. S775Anonth. (708) 
367-7412 or (708)680-9338. 

LAKEFRONT- 3-BEDROOM 

HOUSE with basement. 1-1/2car 
garage In Wlldwood, No pets. 
Available July 1st. S865/nK)nlh, 
t-Ulimtes. (708) 680-0713, 

MUNDELEIN- 2-3BEDROOM, 
OH family room, ceramic bath, 
llvlng/dinlng. now Wtchen with 
appliances, mud room wllh 
washer/dryer, wall-to-wall 
carpeting, newfy decorated, paib, 
r*» yard, garage, $895. Avalable 
Immediately. (708) 949-0449. 



LEGAL NOTICE I 
PUBLICATION IS EASY 
AND CONVENIENTIN 
LAKELAND 

NEWSPAPERS 
An invitation is extended to 
public bodies, attorneys, 
businesses and private citi- 
zens to use the publica- 
tions of Lakeland 
Newspapers for conve- 
nlenl. efficient and eco- 
nomical publication 
required for Legal Notice 
by the State of Illinois 
statutes. 
Legal notices may be 
placed in person al our 
centrally located business 
office, 30 S. Whitney St.. 
Grayslake. 60030, or sent 
by mall or FAX. 708-223- 
8810. The telephone num- 
ber Is 708-223-81 61 . 
The 14 community news- 

Eaper publications ol 
akeland Newspapers 
meet all the statutory 
requirements for Legal 
Notice In Lake Cr-inty. III. 
Our rates are ei o.iomical 
and our deadline is the lat- 
est in Lake County. We 
regularly provide publica- 
tion service under ihe tight- 
est lime restrictions. 
The Lakeland staff is expe- 
rienced in the unique 
requirements for Public 
Notice. We are ready to 
assist with your questions 
and all your Public Notice 
needs. For questions and 
rate information, please 
call Chris Kenyon al 708- 
223-8161 . Lei us serve you 
with Legal Notice publlca 
lion. Thank you. 

Tho Publisher 
Lakeland Newspapers 



IN THE UNfTED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
LUMBERMEN'S INVESTMENT CORPORATION, 
a corporation. 
Plaintiff. 

vs. NO. 92 C 2262 

DANtEL L METREYEON: PAULA L 
METREYEON: AETNA FINANCIAL CORP. dibit 
ITT FINANCIAL SERVICES: and VIC J. 
STEELE, lA/u a Tru8t Dsed 
rocord»d In Iha Recordst^s Off le« of 
Uko County, IL, u Doc. No. 2956605; 
Defendants. 

- F SPFCtAL COMI^ISSIONFR-5 SALE 



NOTICE 



^, 




PUBLIC NOTlC£~i3 hereby given in pursuance of 
Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale in the above entitled Court in 
said cause on April 9, 1993. I Alan Ganz. Special 
Commissioner for the Northern Dlsiricl of Illinois. Eastern 
Diviaion. will on July 14. 1993, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at the 
Lake Couniy Counhouse. IB North County, Waukegan, Illinois 
(at the front door), sell to tho highest and best bidder for cash, 
the following described premises, situated In Lake County, 
Illinois. The terms of the Sale are Cash. 

Said property Is improved wiih a two-story, frame, single 
family residence and said property Is commonly known as; 
171 Lind Lane, Gurneo, IL 60031 
For Information regarding the real estate, contact: 
KROPIK, PAPUGA & SHAW 
Attorneys for Plaintiff 
120 South LaSalle Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60603. 
Pursuant to §15-1507 (c) (7) of the fllinols Code ol Civil 
Procedure, no information olner than the information contained 
in this Notice will bo provided. 

Dated: April 20, 1993 ^ , ,^ Alan Ganz 

Special Commissioner 

Unlteo Slates District Court 

Northern District of Illinois 

Eastern Division 




Condos/ 
Town Homes 




Mobile Homas 



GURNEE SCHOOLS- 

CONTINENTAL Village 
townhome, 3-bedroom, 1-1A2balh, 
finished basement, many new 
features, lencod palio, new central 
air, swimming pool, excollent 
condition, $79,900. No brokers 
(708) 336-5209. 




Mobile Homes 



19B5 CONNOR. EXCELLENT 
condition, ok'd to stay on Navy 
lot, 2-bedroom. 1-large bath, 
shed stays, nice tot. fwlusl SELL!! 
S12,000 or best olfer. (70a)6B8- 
0849/Agenl Owned. 

1992 PRESTIGE DOUBLE 
WIDE, Mobile home, approx. 
30^50". Whirlpool, washer/dryer, 
dishwasher, 3-bedroom, 2-balhs, 
air conditioned, storage shed. 
Paid S48.000 ihls year. Will sell 
lor 540,000. Getting Divorced. 
(708) 263-^000. 

MOBILE HOME- NORTH 
American, 1983, 63x14, 2- 
twdroom, patto, air conditioning, 
shed. In good condition, S25,000 
(708)731-2412, 



KIRKWOOD MOBILE HOME, 
2-bodroom3, 2-balhs, lots of 
doset space, Itvlngroom kitchen, 
all appliances stay. New air 
condllionor. New lurnace, 3- 
smoke alarms. Fonccd-ln, sided, 
porch and shed. $15,500 (708) 
546-0924. 

MOBILE HOME FOR sale. 
Finandng, No interest. 2-bodroofn, 
many extras. Available now 
$12,500. (708) 296-5308. 

MOBILE HOME- 14X65,-2- 
bedroom, 1-balh, fenced yard, 
screen porch, all appliances slay, 
excellent condition, located In 
Villas of Timbercreek, 
$17.000/negotiabto. (708) 
740-2583 alter 5pm. 




Apartments 
For Rent 



USED 

HOMES 
FOR SAI.E: 

Call for detaUa 

414-857-2891 

Ralnbo^v 
Lake Manor 



1-BEDROOM APARTMENT. 
NO PETS. S525/monlh (708) 
362-3933. 

FOX LAKE- 1-BEDROOM, 1- . 
bath, kitchen appliances, gas 
and water Included. $400/renl, 
$400 security. Cal George (708) 
526-5000. leave message. 

FOX LAKE- VERY large 2 
bedroom aparlmenl In quiet well 
managed complex $575/monlh 
Includes Heal! (708)973-0544. 

GURNEE- BEAUTIFUL 2- 
BEDROOM, 1-bath, balcony, 
storage area, gas appliances, 
washer/dryer, security system. 
$765/month. Available July-1. 
Pets O.K. (700) 

623-2034 .evenl ngs . 




IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILUNOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Mldlirst Bank, State Savings Bank 
1/k/a Mldlirst Savings and Loan Association 
Plalnllfl, vs. 

Francisco G. Soto and Jenifer Lea Soto, at al. 
Defendant. 
No. 91 C 7255 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 23337 

(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 

CONSULT THEIR Qffili ATTORNEYS BEFORE 

BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 

entered In the above entitled cause on February 14, 1992. 

I, Max Tyson, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
Juno 28, 1993 at the hour of 9:15 a.m. at Ihs front door of Lake 
County Courthouse, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bid- 
der lor cash, the following described premises; 

26865 N. Bernlce St., Wauconda, IL 60085 
The Improvamsnts on the property consists of single family, 
wood frame, one story dwelling with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance wllhin 24 
hours, cenlfied funds. No refunds, The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 
The property will NOT be open lor inspection. 
The judgment amount was $34,065.64, 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate ol sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
specified data unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 
For inlormatlon call the Sales Oiflcer al Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 
372-4764 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.. however under Illinois 
law, the Sales Olfk:er Is nol required to provide additional tnfor 
mation olhor than that set forth In ihls notice. 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS • 
EASTERN DIVISION 

Midfirst Bank, State Savings Bank 

l/k/a Midfirst Savings and Loan 

Association 

Piaintilf, No. 92 C 6963 

V.S. 

Mark J. Wesley and Kathleen A. 

Smith, et al. 

Defendant. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 24544 

(ir 13 ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULTTHEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on February 23, 1 933, 

I. Michael Pololle, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
July 16, 1993 al the hour ol 9:30 a.m. at iho front door of Lake 
County Courthouse, 18 N. County Street. Waukegan, Illinois, 
sell to the highest bidder lor cash, the following described 

' 1520 N. Park Dr., Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

Tho improvements on the property consists ol single family, 
wood frame, two story dwelling with an attached parage. 

Stile Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

Tho property will NOT bo open lor inspoclion. 

Tho judgment amount was $80.622.41 . 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certiticaie of sale which will entitle tho purchaser to a deed on a 
specified date unless tho property Is redeemed according to 
law. 

For Information call the Sates Officer at Plalntifra Attorney, 
Flshor and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois, 1312} 
372-4784 from 1 :00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however under Illinois 
law, the Sales Officer Is n&l required to provide additional infor- 
mation other than that set forth in this notice. 



i ■ ' 



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sale to be fun 
and profitable, 
therefore ... 

CALL 



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Ivakelarid Newspapers 
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Address 

Date to Run 



Phone 



City 



Zip 



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Deadlines Wed, 10 a.m., Friday publication 

Mail to: Garage Sale, Lakeland Newspapers, 

P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 



38 Lakeland Newspaper* 



I, i ,.1 1/ 4 '(' ( •' y ,1 I -■ i; 'I '< , 1 



Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



"tjiT«^ 



-j-«.nv«ii.'^k-f i-y*^^-^^ 'w^«3':^u■^J^- 



^^^I^WII.-^III J IIILJI.. 




Apts^omes 
To Share 





SEEKMQ INOfVDUAl. TO share 

34»drcMxn horns, Waukgan. 0((- 
alre'et parking. Laundry. 
S385/monlh Includes ulllltles. 
(708)336-4252- alW:30pm. or 
weekends. ' 




Rooms For Rent 



LAKESIDE ROOM, PRIVATE 
bath, pti^aio entrance, SQO/weibk. 
(708) 356-2747. 




Apartments 
For Reril 




Apartments 
For Rent 




Apartments 
For Rent 




Apartments 
For Rent 




Apartments 
For Rent 




Bus. Property 
For Sale 



Bus. Property 
FofRert 



2-OFFICES. GRAND AND 

RT.45. 2nd floor, S350/n>onth. 
(708). 356-0036 or (708) 
395-S961. 

DOWNTOWN MUNDELEIN 
OFFICES for Rent. Starling at 
5110/monlh +iiiinites Ifxduded. 
(708) 94&-a035. 

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT. 
Main SI. Wauoonda. Days (815) 
385-2700 or eves al (615) 
344-3037. 



LAKEFRONT WITH DOCKING 
privfledges. Large 2-bodroom 
apaitmentsi lloor. Fabulous vtewl 
Small pot, O.K. Available June 
,1sl, S595/monlh, Includes heat. 
Fox Lake. (708)567-1615. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Urge 1 and 2- 
bedroom apajimords, Lake Villa, 
:S535 and SSSO/month. Heat 
water, air Included. (708) 
356-5474. 



^Gray slake S 

^ 1 Bedroom ^ 
k Apartments j9 

S "^$499.00 5 

Spay s 1st mo. rent & deposit fc^ 
^ GRAYSLAKE 5 
S APARTMENTS 1 

^ Heat Included ^ 

^(708)223-8870^ 

^ 'new reskjent, t yr laase ^ 



LARGE FURNISHED MOTEL 
rooms, private bath, cleaning 
service, Cablo-TV. Near town. 
Kllchenetlos. $110/woek. Call 
Lakeview Motel, Twin Lakes. 
(414)877-3043. 

LARGE VERY NICE, good area. 
2<bedroom 1/bedroom +den. 
Built In appliances. All ulllllles 
except llghls, no pets, (708) 
623-8646 after 5pm. 



^3»3 



A Ingleslde Z 

JJ*paynorent5 

t your 1st month M 

2 $300 Deposit S 

5 on f 

R One & Two Bedrooms ^ 

H 'Spacious g 

g 'Private Balconies m 

2 -FREE Heat S 

± •Short Term Leases avail. S 

3 LAKEVIEW S 
(t APARTMENTS (f 
J (708) 587-9277 J 

2 'new resident, 1 yr lease V 



ISLAND LAKE, 1 -BEDROOM 
apartment, all ullllltes Irkluded, 
except electric. Ckise of shopping 
center, $400/monlh +8ecurity. 
(708)526-1491. 

LAKE BLUFF- LARGE 1 and 2- 
bedroom apartment In quiet 
private area. Pool and dubhouse. 
S535+up/monlh. Hoat Included, 
(708)615-9717. 

LAKE VILLA- 1-AND 24>ednx}m 
apattmerts, largo kiction, laundry 
ladllty, beach righls. From $475- 
$600/monlh. Includes heat. 
(708)265- 1740, 



LAKE BLUFF- VERY large 2- 
t>edroom apartment In quiel well 
managed security complex. 
SSOO/mo. Qarage available. 
(708)473-3931. 

WAUKEGAN MODERN 1- 
BEDROOM apartment In quiet 
security buikling. Laundry (acllty. 
$42S/month^08)6_23-9B50._ 

OUTDOOR LOVERS 

APARTMENT. 10011. beach pier 
on 3/4-acre yard, 2-bedroom, 
a] utlBies, Ssgo/month 10 minutes 
10 Rfchmond, Twin Lakes, Wise, 
(708) 256-0986 or (414)877- 
9380. 



/^PEBBLESHIRE 
PHASE 1 

Spacious, modern 1 & 2 bdrm 

apts from $£" "" '" 
FREE heat & cooking gas. 
•PLUSH CARPETING 
•MODERN APPLIANCES 
•LAUNDRY FACILITIES IN 
EVERY BUILDING 
•ON SITE MAINTENANCE 

MINUTES FROM 
HAWTHORN CENTER 

708-367-4504 

^95 Westmoreland D t: 




DEEP LAKE 
HERMITAGE 

^1 Bedrcom Special; 

Spacious 1 & 2 bed 
room apartments. Free 
gas & cooking. .Wall to 
wall carpet, appliances 
Included. Ample close 
space. Tot lot, tennis ' 
basketbull court an 




LAKESIDE 

LUXURY 

lAPARTMENTSI 

•Microwave ovens 
•Washers & dryers - j 
•Vaulted ceilings 
•Patios or balconies 

•Dishwashers- 
•Convenient location 

(708) 356-0800 

TOSWatef'sEdgeDr. 
Lake Villa, IL 

On Routa 132 (Grand Av9.) 
Just east of Routa 83 at tha 
south side of Oeap laka 

,^*^ Protanlonaliy 
^2J mMpagedby 
UanagemBnt 
Really Partnara f<y 



VERNON HILLS. 1- 
BEDnoOM(JULY) and 2- 

bedoom (Juie) coodos, caipeted, 
appllaiKss, central eUr, laundry. 
Quiet area S^mlnutes from 
Hawthorn Center. $60O-$650. 
(708) 272-7449. 

NORTH .CHICAGO- 

EFFICIENCY aparlmeni, 
$350/monlh. All utilities IrKluded. 
1724 Sheridan Rd, Call (or 
appolnlmont, (70B) 866-7094. 

ORCHARD APARTMENTS- 3- 
1/2 miles west ol CLC on 
Washington St. 2/bedroom, 
carpeted, air conditioned, 
appliances. Heal, water and gas 
Included. Laund7 ladlftles. NOT 
approved for Section 6. No pets 
or Walerbedsl $540/mo. 
(708)328-6674 

PALATINE, DELUXE 2- 
BEDROOM apartment, all 
appliances, balcony, newly 
painted. Heat, water, cooking 
gas Included, 35S0/month. 
(708)438-2548. 

SUMMER WEEK RENTAL. 
Private lakelront apartments. 
BhjH Lako/Aribch. PtersvwncrAig, 
laundry. Beautiful condition, no 
pets, non-smokers. From 
$500/wk. (708) 798-1161 
Reserve sooni 



DOWNTOWN MUNDELEIN 
OFFICE BUILDING $119,900 
Call (708) 949-8035, 




Bus. Properly 
For Rent 



Si 



BUSINESS 



INDUSTRIAL SPACE 



FOUMTAINHEAD 

CORPORATE CENTER 

ON RT. 12 IN RICHMOND 

Superior 2,650 sq. fL 

to 5.100 sq. ft unit 
Overtiead door/docl< 

A/C OlRce 
LAND MANAGEMENT 

(815) 678-4771 



FOR RENT 

Commercial 

Building Space 

inFoxLsJce 

50' X 50' with 2 over- 
head electric 12' x 
14' garage doors, 1 
service door, 1 bath- 
room, outside stor- 
age -20' X 50', park- 
ing for 8 vehicles, 
$800 per month. 
(Utilities not Included.) 

Call: 
(708) 587-6068 




Farms 




AplsyHomes 
To Share 



RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE 
WANTED to share 3-t}odroom 
home in Round Lake PaiK (708) 
740-0813. 



Car Lot 
avaiuble 

on Rt. 12 in Richmond 
with excellent visibility. 
Car lot with 1 1/2 bays, 
detached garage and 
sales office S695/rno. 

Land 
Management 
815-678-4771 



WANTED: 10-20 ACRES fann 
land, su labia lor gowlng nursery 
stock- (708) 551-1767. 




Vacant Lots/ 
• /Acreage 



YOU ALWAYS HIT 
THE MARK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



GENTELMANS FARM SrTES. 
&-1/2 to 9/acre gently rolling, 
ready-to-bulld sites. Some 
wooded, some HIGH, sloping 
with FOX RIVER FRONTAGE. 
Beautiful setting for Victorian or 
Log homes. Just north ol Illinois 
border in Budlngton. Close to 
shopping, schoots, lakes, gol, dog 
tracks & well-know stables. 
$44,900 loS64,g00. Land Cortrad 
OK. Call tor plat NOW before 
they're gone! (414) 421-8582. 

LOT FOR SALE. 1612 Deerpalh, 
Round Lake Beach. Asking 
517,000. (708) 546-6012. 




] WATERS 
EDGE 
APTS. 



•STOCKED Rthing Pond 

•Scenic country setting 

•Oistinclively designed apis, wilh spacious 

Ibor plans &C/A 

•FREE gas heat, cooking & hot water 
•Pidure window kitchens wilh color coordinaied 

appliances inc. D/W & now no-wax lloors 
•Balcony or patio . Patio veriicats ind. 
•On-silB management / malnienanco 
•Security buildings / Intercom 
•On-site laundry facilities 
•MinutM frofn train, l-tM & •hopping 



1 & 2 Bedroom Special 






,*•*. .•'■V • • .-mj-^ ~~ . "- - tf I ' 




Your Guide To Area 

Real Estate. 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Call 

(708)223-8161 



at's New On the Market 



Vacant Land 

Excellent Hawthorn 

Wood a Location 
2.11 acres on private cul- 
de-sac. Largest Lot in 
Bridle Woods! Come build 
your dream home todayl 
Priced to sell fast $89,900, 
Lot WTO Steeplechase Dr. 

Call Mary Bcbak 

C-21 American Northwcit 

(708) 726-2100 



CALL MARIA FOR APPT. 
708-587-6888 




GURNEE 

36790 Grandwood, 
Grandwood Park Sub. 
3 bd, 1 1/2 bath, 1 1/2 car 
garage on large comer lot. 
All new kitchen, very clean 

and nicely decorated. By 
owner at $113,900. 

(708) 356-4382 



BYOWNER-INGLESIDE- 

FOX LAKE Ranch. 3-4 Iwd- 

loom, 2 balhs, custom bi;iit-in 

cabinets, and storage through- 

01)1, lull finished baserront 
Overeized 2-1/2+ car garage, 
breezeway, patio, on wooded 
1/2 acre lot Walk to schools, 

parks, marinas, and train. 

$121,900, By Appointmenl 

Only. 212 Devlin Rd.(70B) 
507-6967 or (708) 624-7710. 



PRICED TO SELL 

3-unit building. 

S1,200/mo Income, Fox 

Lake. Out of State owner 

says SELLI 

$83,900 

Ryan & Co. Realtors 
708-52^-0300 



I? 



VACANT LAND!!! 

EXCELLENT KILDEER 

LOCATION. 6.2 acres of 

wcxjded wonderiand. Totally 

subdividaUe wim one acre 

zoning. DEVELOPERS 

DREAM! Lot #4, Amy Lane 

Kildeer. $375,000. 

021 AmoicM Northwest 

708-728-2100 
ask for Mary Bebak 



RENTAL 

You Have Seen The Rest 
Now Rent The Bestl 

The perfect Ranch, 3 bed* 

rooms, 1 .1 bath, 2 car garage 

withteft. Many upgrades. 

Great t-ake Zurich location. 

Possession Aug. 1st 

Call Mary Bebal( 

(708) 726-21 GO 

C-21 American Northwest 



WESTWIND VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave. 
Zion, IL 

1 Bedroom from $395.00 
2 Bedrooms from $495.00 

HEAT INCLUDED!! 

Appliances 

Custom Blinds 

On-Site Manager 

No Pets 

Call Manager to view 

708-872-5404 



EXCEPTIONAL 

Formidable $237,500 

Quality construction & design 

Is evident throughout this 

custom 2-5toiy near the lake! 

Custom, customi It's these 

custom touches that make 

this home "extra special." 

For private showing call 

Mary Bebak at 

(70Q) 726-2100 

C-21 American Northwest 



TRAINING! 
TRAINING! 
TRAINING! 

INo experience wantedll 
[We'll train you-FREE! You 
lean earn while you leamij 
CaU Roreno al CENTURyI 
;21 TRI-TOWN today. 

949-5244 



STATBLYCX)LONIAL 

3 bedroom, newly remod- 
eled t 1/2 bath and country 
kitchen. BeautKul lenced 
yard w/great deck. Seller 
transferred! S69,900. 

V/VFHA 

Cat Miranda Reader 

orJeanette Donahue 

Century 21 

Maki & Assoc. 

708-336-7333 



Business Rentals 

Spring Grove 

1,000 sq. ft. and larg 
er. Lite industrial/man 
ufacturing starting at 
$3.95/sq. ft. gross. 

Spring Ridge 
Business Ctr. 

815-675-6183 



OFFICE SPACE 

FOR RENT 

On Rte. 1 2 near 

Richmontj. 800 sq. 

U. new building with 

air conditioning. 

$450/mo. 
(815)675-6677 



diain. 

Lakcfront Condo. 

2 bd, 2 bath. Excellent! 
Central air, appliances, a 

Great Price $109,900. 

Call John for details 

C-21 Care 

(708) 587-2575 or 

(708) 587-1798 



Rental 

OFFICE SPACE 
Spring Grove 

1,625 sq. ft. consists of 3 
offices, conference room, 
kitchen area, general/ 
walling area. Mult) phone 
lines. Available June let. 
Additional space also 
Qvallable, 

815-344-8400 



FOX LAKE 
TOWN HOME 

Choice 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath 
end unit in WoodhiUs Bay. 
Features private entrance 
Lake/Woods view, oak cabi- 
nets, all major appliances, 
central air, dining room with 
dry bar, sunken living room 
with gas start fireplace, ceiling 
fan, concrete patio with priva- 
cy wall, sundeck off master 
bedroom with miirored walk- 
In closet, garage with sepa- 
rate workJshop/storage room. 
Enjoy swimming, tennis, boat- 
ing, clubhouse facilities, 
aose to train, schools, shop- 
ping. Ideal year 'round living. 

Located high & dry at 2 S 

Mineota Rd. Rrst time offered 

by original owner. Priced to 

sell fast $98,500. 

(708) 587-1937 



Models on 
Display 

1,369 sq. ft! 3 bed- 
room, 2 full baths, 
fvlaster suite features 
hjb & skylights. Deluxe 
appliance package. 
Spacious grassy lots & 
concrete driveway 
await your choice 
home. Pool & magnifi- 
cent clubhouse facility 
playgrounds & more. 
Other floor plans avail- 
able. Prices start 
under $30,000,. 

Call 414-248-3831 
Pioneer Ests. 

Hwy. H South 
Lake Geneva, Wl 



Let's Deal! 

One of the largest units in 
the complex, countryside 
townhomo, 2013 Westview, 
Round Lake Beach, for sale 
tiy owner. OPEN EVERY 
SUNDAY 1-4 pm til sold. 
Hugg savings, buy direct 
from us, no commissions 
added in. 
MOTIVATED 
Incentives if purchased imme- 
diately. We'll listen to creative 

panlal down payment. 3 

bdrm, t \t2 bath, living room 

with fireplace, dining room, 

kitchen, family room, 2 car 

garage. MAKE OFFER. 

Move in immediately. Call 

(708) 545-0817 or (708) 740- 

8149 leave msg. 

Must sell. Moving out ot town 

as soon as you move Inl Jcb 

related urgency. 

S89.900. ■ 



Fox Lake 

Leisure Village 

Lakeside Rental 
Like new 2 bed- 
room, 1 1/2 bath, 

living room, kitchen 

& year-'round 

Florida room. 

Attached 1 car 

garage. Great view 

of Fox Lake 

Country Club. 

Walk to recreation 
center, Olympic 
pool, 9-hole golf 

course, etc. Adult 

living. Min. 1 yr. 

lease. Available 

June tsLCall 

414-534-6511 . 



*z.- 



Frlday, Jun« 4, 1993 



Lakotand Newspapers 39 



Wt'^ 



..—J 






m 



K- 




Vacant Lots/ 
Acreage 




Out 01 Area 
Property 




Out 01 Area 
Property 



APPROX. 1/2 ACRE CORNER 
lot with 2-bulIdable sitos wllh 
sower. Many Iml trees and pirws. 
Beautltully landscaped In Lake 
Monlgomery Highlands, Salem, 
Wl Includes lake rights. 539,500 
(708) 356-7501 alter 5pm. 

BY OWNER, LOT In Round Lake 
Beach, located on Beverly Dr. 
(312) g2&-€327. 

EXECUTIVE HOMES AREA: 

Sundial Farms. 1-Full ACRE 
Only 539.9001 Near beautllul 
wooded Slate Park, by Chain 
Olakes. Call (708)985-7796 
for more details. 



CORP. RETREAT/QENTLE- 
MANS FARM. 320 ac. laim land 
north Cenlral Kansas, Good 
Investmont properly w/exc«llont 
appreciation prospect. Ownor 
deslros leaso baclf. Phoasant, 
quail, praJrie cliicken on property. 
Owner seller. (013) 470-2244 



OHIO GET AWAY 

12,000 af txlck homes on 5f ac. 6 
br. 5 blh, 5 k-lg (anVbontra rn«, 
Matiy grand features, See ad 
Urtlque horrws, stiort drive to Mid 
Ohio race lraci<. Mansfield, OH. 
irtqiiries confidential. 'S725 K. 
Call M.B. Thompion, CHUCK 
WARNER ASSOC. 4l9/76ft-735e 





Rasoits/ 
Vacation Rentals 



KAUAI, HAWAIL 1 -BEDROOM 
CONDO, steeps 4. ocean view, 
5100;por night. Dec.l 7 thru Dec. 
31. Call (408) 286-6748, Call 
refunded. Call now lor t>est alr- 
lare. 

LAKE GENEVA -INTERLAKEN, 
2-bodroom oondo, luily lurrished. 
Call now. Save 50% on weekly 
rates. Ask lor Rich, 
(312)825-2575. 

MODERN SUMMER COTTAGE, 
fulty furnished and boat, East 
Ljoon l.ake, IL on water, available 
now through 10/2/93. Month or 
Season Rates. Call (312) 
736-0974. 



WYOMING 

Hottest prop. Popular col- 
lege bar/restaurant package 
store, Nrly. $1 mil. gr. 9000 
sf bidg. Land, FEE & lie. 
$650K. CaJI Owner (retiring). 
Don Bunn 307/745-3490. 



KANSAS 

TIRED OF CITY UVING7 

Come to Southern KtnMs. 

Good tdiooli, good lir, good 

weather. Luwily 3 yr. old home, 

6br,oo20iic«, Pool, fauna. 

•ecurity •yitem i more. Witfiin 

1/4 mil« of 1S bote gotr club. 

Wntk down one of th« moit 

bMutJhi canyons in Koneai to 

ttie Walnut River. Priced 

$1,350,000. Call (316) 221-1760 

between 8-5 pm tor Inlo. 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Kendersonvllle, Flat Rock, 

Secured community. Home- 
sites & Villas on goll course 
Great view sites also avail 
Rand McNaliy rated retire- 
ment area. Near AshevIHe, 
airport, hospital. Outstanding 
cuilural activities. 
KENMURE 1-a00-345-186O 
Void where prohlb'rtsd by law 




Real Estate 
Wanted 



FIXERS W/WTED: NEW RehsiJ 
Firm can pay cash for 2 or 3- 
bedroom homes ki Ctiain OlBkes 
area In need of repair. Any 
condltton conskJorod. Must bo 
able to produce clear title. Call 
(703)74CW051 lo llnd out about 
easy acqulstlon plan. 




Out 0( Area 
Property 



WtSCONSIN. Norttiemaroa. 

IPktufesqufl l/Zlrame, 1/2 remod, 

lOOyroUkio home wHIi 160 

acres d privacy. Horse bam, 

wo<k ihop, Irg. pole barn, trout 

slraam. North/joulh liay lioW lul- 

Ablfltoralrslr'p. $165,000. 

(715)564-2638 



ILLINOIS 

l&iecullve living Al lis Bestl 4BR 
\z 12 blh, lormal dining m. living 
Irm & lam. rm, den, whirlpool 
I Much More, Ctote to 1-90 access 

Is2ig.ooo. 

IcaH Pat Brake, Broker/Owner,! 
IeBA brake ALT/. & CU9T0MI 
IbUIUERS. INC. 8^5-623-7101. [ 



CRIPPLE CREEK, CO. 

Prime Gaming 

Property. 3 lots with 

existing structure 

$900,000. 

Call O'BRIEN REALTY 

(719) 687-3430 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILUNOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Liberty Savings Bank, FSB as successor by 
mefger with Patos Savings and Loan Association 
Plaintiff, N0.92C4S17 

VS. 

LaSaSlo National Tmst, N.A. Successor Trustee 
to LaSalle National Bank, Successor Trustee lo 
LaSalle Bank Northbrook, f/k/a Nonhbrook Trust 
and Savings Bank as Trustee as TAJ/T ffLT2723. el al. 
Detendani. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 24153 

(rr IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 

OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant lo a Judgement 

entered in the above entitled cause on October 23, 1992. 

I, Alan Mills, Special Commissioner lor this court will on 
July 14, 1993 at the hour o( 4:00 p.m. at the front door of 
Courtroom 2302, Daley Civic Center, Chicago. Illinois, sell to 
the highest bidder for cash, the following desaibed premises; 
1574 E. Course Dr.. Riverwoods, IL B0015 
The improvements on the property consists of single fami- 
ly, wood frame, one and a hall stories with an attached garage. 
Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 
24 hours, certified funds. No relunds. The sale shall bo sub- 
ject to genera] taxes and to special assessments. 
The property will NOT bo open for inspection, 
the judgement amount was $1 14,739.51 . 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Receipt of sale which wiirentille the purchaser to a deed on a 
specified dale unless the property Is redeemed according to 
\aH, subject to Court's approval. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 
372-4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however, under Illinois 
law, the Sales Officer Is not re quired to provide additional infer 
maiion other than that set forth in this notice. 



Lterican Dream 








''^-i^'%-^ 



Pikeridge 



^106,900 

(on your tot} 
garage included 



"T t 



l£i_L 




l<*^^\:4^^ 



'^■^ 



Compare these standard features: 

• 12* of Rse ceiling Insulation 

• 2x6 exterior walls R-20 standard 

■ Ceilings and Interior walls are gypsum board 

• Maintenance free vinyl siding, standard 

• Cedar or other sidings, optional 






Welcome 
Home 

TO OVER 90,000 
FAMILIES 



• Gas lorcod air heal 

• PeachUM insulated metal dad entrance door 

• Hiormal wood windows with maintenance free 
exleriotdi^d wrappings. 

• A compMe Iihim, p«int, ttilned and cvpeted. 

Prica does not include pemiis, survey arwl engi- 
neering lot doaring sower and wator or sfipfc 
and woil, culvorts, drivoways, walla, landscap- 
Irig or linandng (Thosa and oihor silo iinprove- 
menis airailablQ. Lower leveb on Bl-kivel> and 
Tftlovels not finished). 



COUNTY LINE BUILDERS 

21 6 Janet Drive Island lake 
708-526-8306 



TRIPLE T BUILDERS 

34390 N. Rte. 45 Lake Villa 
708-223-7900 




Real Estate 
Wanted 



I BUY HOUSES, 
ir you're flexible on price, I'll 
give you good terms. 
C70e) 872-^047. 



HORSE HEAVEN COUNTRY 
ESTATE. Wisconsin. AH brick 
5-bedroom ranch, 4,200sq.ll. 
Immaculate, hardwood floors, 
Jacuzzi, cozy Ibrary. large family 
-Kjamo fT»m, 60x105 Indoor rkie 
arena with elevated view room, 
cinder block bam 35xB0, with 
6/stalls, outdoor arena, extra 
2+3 carAraltar garages, 4-acro 
pasture of lota! 8-acro property. 
15-mlnutos north of Aniloch, IL. 
S310,000. (414)878-1405. 




ICO 



EU^JSOJ 




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ru 




icn 



DJ^JgDJ 




ICD 



flj 



Contact Your 

Classified Account 

Executive al 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney 

Grayslake»IL 60030 

(708)223-8161 

'TknvrepiTdl^moreyaiSd' 

AD WRITING TIPS 



/: 



These helpful tips when 
wriling your ad lo help 
maximize your response! 
REAL ESTATE 

Location 
Consmidion (Frame? BtickT) 
Aidtitcdmr:, Landscaping 
Nuinbcr of Rooms, Dcsci^on 
Number of Bedroom 
Condition, Ag!^ 
Posscsscn Dale 
Con vcnicnoc lo Stores, 
Schools and Tianspoitaiion 
Lot SJTE, Zoning 
Gajagp 
BaihiDOms 
Kitchen (Diiposal?) 
Basement, Rcaiaticn Room 
City Scwcr.UlaH tics 
Healing 
Bitplaoc 
Plumbing 
Rui]i]hs,Gosci5 
Features for Qiildren 
Price, Toms, HcfwMudi Dwhi? 



aPWBB!5!BSiag!Sg!S?^U^!.k^J^tk<!»)^^^!4')^4'5g^^j5R^^ 



RECREATIONAL 




Recreational 
Vehicles 




Boats/ 
Motors/Etc. 




KAWASAKI JET-SKI, MOVING- 
MUST SELL! 440CC. NEW 
CUSTOM PAINT, NEW 
IMPELLERS" IPE, $1 .250. (708) 
398-5481. 

MOTOR HOME- 1986, 26 
MALLARD, Low miles, excoltenl 
condlHon, Best olfer! (414) 
65B-2916. 

SEA-OOO Sfl, 1990. INCLUDES 
S/S IMPELUER, COVER. PLUS 
MANY EXTRAS. TOP-QF-THE- 
LINE MODEL USED 5-TIMES. 
MOVING. MUST SELL. 
$4.0Q0/lirm. (70B) 390-5481. 

SLIDE-IN CAMPER, e-1/2FT. 

stove, refrigerator, potty, good 
oondllon S2,300/bestotler. (414) 
694-2945. 

VIKtNG POP-UP CAMPER, 
1989, GAS€LECTRIC FRIDGE. 
Electric brakes. Awning, Spare 
lire. Sleeps 6. FURNACE, TV 
ANTENNA, Other leatures. 
$3,250, (708) 838-0637. 




Snowmobiles/ 
ATVs 



POLARIS 92EF1 500SP, Custom 
palnl, gas shocks, clean, many 
extras, 3<ptace Leiand 2-axle. 
(708) 520-3559. 




Boats/ 
Motors/Etc. 



14FT. BAYLINER 197G, open 
bow, trailer, 50hp Force. Moving, 
Must Sacrifice, $1,500. (708) 
249-8512, eves. 

16FT. RBERGLASS SAILBOAT, 
sails Included 42 lite preservers, 
$600 Cashfkm. (708) 328-1735. 

16FT. OWENS, 75HP Evinrude, 
trailer Included. Looks Good, 
good shape. $1,700A)e8l. Catl 
alter 4pm. (706) 473-3315. ' 

ISFT. COBOLT, 1977, Bow rider, 
180hp, Marina sen/Iced and 
Inside storaged. New canvas 
cover 32.800. (414) 742-2593. 
1973, 23FT. CARVER Cuddy 
Cabin, fiberglass hulL I65hp. 
VO, 4-wtiool traior, good corxlion, 
35.200. (708)529-&476. 

1982 SEA RAY, 19(1. 228 horse. 
\fO, Excollonl condition. Only 
eOhours. 56,500 (706) 362-2696. 



BAYLINER SARATOGA. 1979, 

needs to bo adoptedl 25ft. with 
trailer, stand-up cabin sleeps- 
4; electric hook-up; dinette; 
microwave; slandup enclosed 
head; massive sloieo (am/lm, 
CDiJtayor wHh 400walt amp); 
electronics (VHF/CB/ Haller/ 
Deplhsounder); twin Votvo 130*3 
virith Vo(vo Penta ouldrtves; new 
cairper canvas; many extras; 
wcl maMalnod. Ready to Launch. 
AsWng $10,000- but let's talkl 
(708) 3 58-6953. 

1991 SUPER JET, LOW hours, 
excelksnt condtikm, $3,500 (708) 

526-3328. 

19FT. FOUR WINNS, 1990 
Freedom 190 V-6, 175hp OMC 
IAD, Mint condition, Must seel 
Ski package Included, 
$1l,500/bost otter, (708) 
746-2612. 

21 FT. SAILBOAT, 3/SAILS, 
trailer, dinghy, motor, $2,250. 
(708)866-8313. 

2HP. JOHNSON OUTBOARD 
motor, wator cooled, short- shaft, 
brand new, full warranty, never 
been run, $550*est olfer. (708) 
497-3580. 

SAILBOARD- MISTRAL, ONE- 
DESIGN with 6.6 rig and extras. 
Used 5-tlmes. (708) 360-0026. 

1986 GLASSPORT INCLUDING 

skis, and tut»o. Groat condition. 
$6.00at)e£i> oaof, (708) 949-9407. 

1989 21 FT. BAYLINER, Capri 
with ctxkJy cabin and lull camper 
top, excellent condition, $7,900. 
(708) 223-6260. 

1977 THOMPSON BOAT, 82 

Tandem trailer, 307 Chevy I/O, 
Full/ cqu^Dped lor Lakf) Michigan 
fishing, $5,900, (815) 385-5432 
after 5pm. 

1983 BAYLINER CUDDY CaWn 
19tl. 120tp Votvo VO. full canvas 
and mooring cover, depth tinder, 
$4.700. (706) 587-5534. 

1983 SEA RAY 21ft. Cuddy, 
head, full canvas, low hours, 
A-1 condHtof). $9.900A>ost oHer. 
(708)295-3199. 



Lakeland Newspapers 
Delighted • . 

y ^ I wa.t delighted that I got quid a lot nf calls after ^^ 
^te placing my ad In the Lakeland Newspapers. I y y 

^^ ^^ nnt tlin liniicit rnnti^d rinlil nte/nv ^ 



got the Itousc rented right away, 



K.CclscI 
Nlles, IL 

708-223-81 Gl 




I,ukc]tuicl NcwopuiKfH Cluflfiincd 




OVEHALL DIMENSIONS: 70'-0' X 4B'-0" 

LIVING: 1664 square foet 
GARAGE: 580 squore loet 



BIRCH (402-611 

Gy Lindmark Dnitgnt, Inc. 



A gazebo-shapod nooif and a wide front porch give a festive and welcoming appearance to the Birch, 
a small home designed for a young family, a single person, or an older couple with grown children 
Bedrooms are clustered together, to the right, and family living spaces, both formal and infomial, .ye to 
the left 

The nook, with its eight-sided vaulted catling, is equally striking Inside. Naturally Illuminated by bay 
windows, this room Is filled with tight. Poned plants put on their best loaf and bloom in this sunny spoL 
and when neighbors and other guests drop by, ihoyll probably want to sit hero to chaL 

Washer and dryer ore close at hand, hidden botiind pocket doors in a pass-through space to iho 
garage. A wide multipaned window provides plenty of natural light, and the counter beneath the window 
is handy for folding clothes. Some women might like to put their sewing machine hero. 

The kitchen has plenty ol cupboard and counlor space and a sink thai facas into tho nook. A largo 
pant/y adds still more storage capacity. O'Jior amenities Include a built-in dishwasher, range and oven. 

Dining room and living room flow together. Those rooms could bo furnished either formally or infer- 
maiiy, as dictated by family protoronco. In the livlr>g room, windows flank tho fjroplaco and eliding glass 
doors open onto ttie patio or dock. 

Storage space is ptontitui in this plan. A coal closet Is Just inside the entry and a long storage closet 
lines the hallway to the bedrooms. The master suite has a large walk-in closet and a wide linen closeL 
Amenities in the private bathroom Include twin basins and an oversized shower. 

Secondary bedrooms are equal in size. They share a dual-compartment bathroom with a long slender 
window over tho mirror. 

The garage isn't dark either. It has two windows at tho back. 

For a study plan ol tho BIRCH (^iOS-Sl), send $9.00, or for a collection of plan books featuring our 
most popular home designs, send $20.00 to Landmarit Designs, P.O. Box 2307-LP60, Eugone, OR 
97402. (Be sure to specify plan name & number when ordering.) 




Boats/ 
Motors/He.' 



BOSTON WHALER- 10 long 
(eel ol (unl Compete with Iralfer, , 
eall, oars. Capable of handling 
motors, too. Pertect for kids or 
beginhg sailors. $475flbest otter. 
By June 15,(708)223-8297. 

CANOES- 12FT. -17FT. 

Radlsson, AmoriFtter Lite, and 
Osaglan. spedaf 1711. tor$22SJ95, 
Polar Krafi Jonboal, 10tt.-18FT., 
Many stylos, starting at $445. 
Also carrying line ol Tahatsu 
outboard motors. B&K Enterprise, 
Salurday and Sunday, 7an>3pm, 
Monday -Friday, by appointment. 
(414)878-4341. 

CAPRI CATALINA 22FT. 
Sailboat, Winged keel, trailer, 
6hp O/B, Loaded. Like new, 
$11 .OOO/olfer (708) 234-7627, 

FISHERMANS DREAM. 1989 
Spectmrn boat 14.8', wtthtraltef, 
1992 15hp Evinrudo etedric start 
motor, fbh kicalor, etodrtc troling 
motor, swtvel seals. $4,000 (706) 
54ft-3059. 

MUST SELL AT LOW 
WHOLESALE 1966 Bayllner 
20(t. LO, open bow, sharp, dean, 
runs groat. $4,400 (708) 
21&-1777. 

PONTOON- 1992 SUN 
TRACKER Dl, 24n. Party Barge, 
90hp, gas grill, comfort sealing 
foklout to kingstzo bod, lav wtth 
privacy curtain, lots of extras, 
$12.000 (708) 832-6510, 

1982 BAYLINER, 27S0 
VICTORIA, SunbrWgo, 27H. lufl 
canvas, screened, shore power, 
Loran C, galley, head, single 
260 MorCrulser, excellent 
oondltk>n, Many Extras. $14,500 
(708) 697-5629. 

19B9 BAYLINER 2155 CIERRA 
Sunbridge V-8, full cabin, with 
soparto head, canfier kJp, custom 
cockp<t cover, lull mooring cover, 
(3)props, 'Very Clean', $13,395. 
(708) 516-2922. 




Camping 



CAMPER TRAILER, SELF 
contained, oxccloni condlton, al 
extras Included! $1,700 (708) 
973-1447. :. . .' jy 




Sports 
Equipment 



EXERCISE EQUIPMENT LIKE 
NEWl Bike and Atr stepper, 
$150/bOlh. Call (708)223-8297. 

GOLF BLUBS- 3PW Dunlop 
DDH. with Aldlla-SL 300 linn 
graphNo shafts, r>ew 1/93, used 
7-tlnfiG3. Now $499; wll sell $300. 
(708) 367-4452. 



TRANSPORTATION 




Cars For Sale 



40 Lafceland Newspapers 



1990 CORVETTE 

CONVERTIBLE, red, blad< and 
black. 6-qxtod, al optiona. 1 .100 
origlrul miles. 527.500. (708)885- 
9978. 

ACURA,1991 INTEGRA, RED, 
2-door, automatic, air, am/lm 
CD, 23.000/mlles. Immaculalol 
Must see, (414) 694-8122 or 
(706)934-6502. 

BUICK, 19B3 CENTURY, 4- 
door, ^cylinder, lO.OOOmlles on 
engine, exooBorl corKRion, $2,200 
(414) G52-6994 after 4:30pm. 

CHEVROLET- 1969 CAMARO, 

350 with rebuilt 350 motor at 
15,000/rrtlos, Now extHusl, cartj. 
$2.600.(414)654-7860. 

CHRYSLER LEBARON 
CONVERTIBLE, 1984. rebuilt 
engine, newer mutller, newer 
lop. Sofiy Etofeo cassette, No lust, 
low miles. Ready lor summer 
Fun! $3,300/orbo5t offer. Bob 
(706)587-5370. 

CHRYSLER, 1989 LEBARON, 
GTC, convertible, all while, 
excellent condition, $8,500. 
YAM AHA 650, 1981 RiJns,S30a 
(708) 336-3840. 

CORVETTE- 1986 
CONVERTIBLE, Indy Pace car, 
low mileage, excellent 
condition, $17,000 (815) 
455-7488. 

COUGAR- 198B RX7, kiaded 
wllh moon roof, 44K. Mint 
condtbn, $7,300A»st offer. (708) 
636-2028. 

1 986 HONDA ACCORD LXI 4- 
door, 5-spood, sunroof, rust- 
proofed. 58K miles, 1-ownor, 
oxcoltent condUkm. $5,800 (708) 
336-7285. 

1986 MONTE CARLO, 4.3 Hire, 
high mitos. mns great, excelkant 
condltton, $3,000/bosl offer. 
Parting Oul FIAT X19, 25K, Call 
after Ttm (706) 740-1644 

• Friday, June 4. 1993 



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1993 



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^^■"■-^^ 



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!mgims?:^ss 



TRANSPORTATION 




I 



Cars For Sate 







Care For Sale 




Cars For Salo 



TOYOTA, 1983 TOYOTA 

ceUCA. 60,000 miles, 4 cylnctef, 
5 speed, little rust. $2^50 or 
best offer. (708)265-1 127. after 
5pm. 

TOYOTA, 19B6-1/2 SUPRA. 

Burgandy, S-speed, excellisnl 
coodRlon, tow mites, $9;200A)fler 
(414)694-^51. 

1986 OLDS CUTLASS 
SifNWiw, bbm, 4^1oor, sunroof, 
anVrni, 6S,S0(Vrnilw, luna grartl 
S2.60Q (708)487-1 Si 6. 

1987 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD 

BROUGHAM, 4 door, light blue 
witi bkjo tealher Weretor, 55,995. 
(414)24fl-&4B1. 

1969 CORVETTE HATCHBACK, 
t06/To6 lealher, glass top, Bose 
stereo, power seals, 35K miles, 
$17/t00. CalJm (706) 244-2000. 

1989 CORVETTE, CLEAN, low 

miles, garage klept, loaded, 
$1B,aoo/best oflor. (706) 
497-^676. 

1990 BUICK RIVIERA SE, 
exoeleni condtion, fBS eveiylhlng, 
46K. ajr-bag, leather, new brsKss, 
$13,700. (708)234-8363 



1988 FORD MUSTANG IX, 2 

door, 4 cylinder, 5 spoed, am/f m 
stereo casaette, roar cfetroster, 
new mag wheels and llres, low 
mfles, always garage kepi, 
km&cxMQ insida and out, perfect 
gradual km gift. (708)80 B-7432. 



Need a Car? 
No Credit? 
Bad Credit? 



Bankrupt? 

WE CAN 
HELP! 

Free Credit Check 

Call Mr. Kenny 
(708) 362-4550 

No guarantee is given 

that everyone that comes 

in can be financed. 



JAGUAR 1982 XJ6 VDP, very' 
good condition, mra well, FuH 
power, sunroof, $4,900. (815) 
477-1047. 

PORSCH, 1983, 944, WHfTE 
WITH BROWhJ INTEHIOR, 
AM/FM CASSEHE, POWER, 
SUNROOF, AIR, AUTOMATIC, 
ALL MAINTAINANCE 

RECORDS, OARAGE KEPT, 
MUST SELL, MUST SEEI 
$7.00at»sJ offer. (708) 670-9330. 




Care f-br Sate 



^IkFourStarTrealmenlA 
Good Credit? Bad Credll? 

Kg Problem 
Wo can arrange financing! 

112 Volvo DL .»,.....»M....»..$2995 

■89 Oldt dan t508S 

-88 Old! -aa Ope 44M5 

TS Dodge Atpon Wagon...4805 

'68 VW QtttU Ql $540S 

77 Fofd Waflon 47BS 

■az Chevette OIomI — .SOOS 

74 Cuilau Si^eme ....„.t1995 
^ Cadllac Sad DaVlto ...S248S 

■ee Okto Firenza. .$1005 

■91 Toyota Camiy IE ™.411 ,495 

■89 n\%MS\ PkK Up .»995 

■83 Oldt Omega S14S5 

■S5 Dodge Omni 4MS 

■85 Cuttau Supreme Cpe.434t)S 
^QCudau S^>«m2dr_«l2.ge5 
■87 Olds 08 Regency .«S4Q5 

MARQUARDT 
OLDS, HYUNDAI, VW 

OnRL41it 

Wuhington St, IjuA exIL 

AGumee,tL(708)249-13O0Jt 



1970 DODGE CH/JtGER, 318, 
automatic, air, power steering, 
originally f mm Aiizona, excellent 
corxfllion, Sertous Inqukies ortlyl 
Sexwo. A«er ^xn (414)539-3381. 

1976 MERCEDES 4S0SEL, 
Metallic blue sunroof, great 
condllion, completely loaded, 
$6.000.(708)356-8942. 

1977 UNCOm MARK V, 56.700 
miles, many new pwirts. $3,000 
or bes< (708)438-5075. - 

1 981 TURBO TRANS AM, 32K 

mites, Calitomla car, no mat, 
asking S4,500A}est offer. (708) 
872-5703. 

1 985 OLDS 90 REGEt^ Y New 
brakes, runs great, beautiful 
ooncffion. Grey, $2,O0Qbest offer 
(708) 855-1636. 

VW 1991 JETTA GL. 4-door. 
aJr, automalk:, sunroof, am/Im, 
10K miles, extra clean, 
$10,650/besl offer. (708) 
438-4311. 




Classic 
Antique Cam 




'P^r'^'^rsn^w^yAME^ci'ie.- 



Motorcycles 



1969 FORD QALAXIE500. 2- 
door, power steering, allnew 
power brakes, EXCELLENT 
ninnlng. EXCELLEMTcondNtoa 
$1^00Aiest offer (706)548-1238. 

CHRYSLER, 1948 WINDSOR, 
4-door, runs, $800/be8t offer. 
(414)859-2448. 




Service * Pf.fts 



Rental Leases 



g AUTO 
iRENTAL 

Rent for Less 
1(708)7463311 



a auyuuuuaBBuiAiu 



1979 CAMARO, PAHTWQ OLTT 
No engine/transmission. 
Wlndsfieids, doors, mags, leave 
springs. Brand new gas-tank, 
etc. Excellent Tan Interior. 

(708)546-8208. " 

CLASSIC QUARTER PANEL 

SAL£. Mtistang, Canuro, Neva, 
Chevetle, Cutlass, Mopars, 
Ponllac, Chevrolet, more! Trunk 
pans, lk>or pans, doois, fenders, 
bumpers. New and Caiifomla 
rust tree. MARK'S PLATING 
AND SUPPLY. 217-824-6184. 

ENGINES- LOW MtLEAQE 

REPLACEMENT MOTORS wfth 
or without Installation. 
Remanutadured engines' also. 
Courtesy Auto Paris, INC. (414) 
652-1391 or (708)249-7766. 




Trucks/Trailera 



JEEP- 1981 CJ^4x4,4-Q*jder, 
sttak. 51.500/best offer. Must 
sell! (414) 85^2778. 



•** M0V1NGI ♦♦* MUST SELU 
Brand new GMC aft. Pickup 
. beds, wtUi bumpers, $550/eacli! 
ONLY 2-LEFTl Old 
Commonwealth Edison truck 
with 42fL Polecat, Boom and 
cnme, $3,500. Call Mika, pager 
ff(70B)61 2-9557 laavo your 
number for return call or call 
evenlnga (708)213-0770. 

1978 GMC 3/^TON Ptck-t^ wNh 
coverod utay bocV, rebul engine, 
$1,300 After Spm, (708) 
68O-4504. 

1979 WILDERNESS CAMPING 

TRAILER, sleeps 6, batti wtlh 
tub. air, heal, stove, fridge, 'neal 
and clean*, well kept, $33X> or 
make an offer. (708) 587-3273. 

1985 FORD RANGER XL, power 

steering, autonullc overdrive V- 

6, with cap, 62,000/mlles, 

. $4jD0Ofcest offer (414) 877-3189. 

1987 DODGE RAIDER 4x4, 5- 
speed manual, am/Im cassette, 
80K, excoOert oondltton, $4,000 
(708)578-0952. ■ 

DUMP BED TRAILER, $2,000. 
After 5:30pm cal (708) 249-3515. 

FORD- 1985 BRONCO 4x4, 
Eddie Bauer, loaded, 
74/)0OATile3, Excelert concilion, 
$7,500 (414) 551 -0744 between 
3-6pm, 



1977 KAWASAKI KZ1000, nJns 
great, new tires. $800. (708) 
473-1334, . ;_ 

HONDA PASSPORT STREET 
Bttce, $400. (708)740-8418 CaH 
alter 3:30pm. 

HONDA, 1982 SILVEfWING 

500, excellent vnondMlon, 
$1,100*)eal offer (414) ,*i97-1359 
alter 4pm or leave message. 

HONDA- 1972-CB500 4: 

exoeDent starierblka, low miles, 
$60<Vbest offer (414) 857-91B7. 

MOTORCYCLE- 1988 HONDA 

Hurrkane 1000. $3,000 Of best. 
oTer. Must SEEH (706) 265-1 336. 




Wanted To Buy 



LOOMNQ FOR REASON/BLY 

priced 4'Wheeier/dlrt BIKE, that 
you/I wouki feel safe letting a 
8-10^r.okl ride on Farm land, 
(backyard). Under $200. Call 
after S-.30pm (70B)9494?41 5. 

WANTED TO BUY- CASH PAID 
FOR USED AUTO. (708)223- 
1873. ^ 

WANTED: ChEVY CAPRICES 
1984-1991. V-B, Classic 
Brougham, LS. Sfallonwagon, 
high and k>w mieage. Can befofo 
you sell ol trade your car. 
(913)962-1261. 




Where To Worship 




Vernon Hills 

St. Gabriel Episcopal Church, 10 Phillip Rd., Vemon 
Hills, the Rev. Paul Heal, Jr., Vicar and the Rev. E)r. Nancy 
Calhouns, Pastoral Associate. St. Gabriel's Church offers 
Caring Groups for everyone, single, niarried, separated or 
divorced, younger, older and in-between, Join the Caring 
Groups on Tuesdays for six-weeks as participants learn to 
apply the concepts of the Bible in your daily lives. Caring 
Groups being on June 8 at 7:30 p.m. St. Gabriel's Church 
invites, all to "Worship in the Park" on Sunday, June 6 at 
the north end of Deeq)ath Park in Vemon Hills. Worship 
service begins at 10 a.m. followed by a barbecue and picnic. 
For more information call the Rev. Paul Heal at 367-5510 
or Janet Mai at 590-1458 (evenings). 



Women of the. Word 

Sunday, June 6 during its 9:30 a.m. worship service, 
Faith Community Church, United Church of Christ, will 
host a dramatic presentation that vividly portrays five key 
women of the Bible. Eve, Rudi, the woman at the well, 
Martha and Mary the mother of Jesus, will all come to live 
using tlie scripture as the scripL Humorous, poignant, and 
deeply moving, this presentation is a production of Robert 



W. Pirsein Ministries. The church is located at 21 Hawthorn 
Pkwy., Vernon Hills. For further information call 367- 
0071. Child care is available. 



Introducing 



SflTUPDllT 




WORSHIP SERVICE (5:30-6:45) « CHILD CARE 



dand 

'L:'anj}cfical 'free Cfiunit 



34515 N. Hunt Cub • Gurnee • 623-1505 



ghaii^ofLakeg 

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH 

Sunday Worship 
the bible: 

God's Power Book for Life - an 
Incomparable Book! 

8:15 & 10:45 AM 
9:45 AM Christian Education 

No Evening Service this Sunday 
Leadersliip Community Night 

(708) 838-0103 or 0104 

CHURCH LOCATED AT 23201 W. GRASS LAKE ROAD 




H! 



If you would like to 
adverliseyour next 
Church activity here, 
Please call (708)223-8161 



1- 





Jamie Louachai, 
Congrotulatlonsl 
Keep up the good 
work and enjoy 
High Schooll 
Love Always, 
Aunt Cindy 




Congratulations To 
Thomas Longley 

Who Graduates 

From McGee 

School on June 5th 

God Bless You 
and We Lcve Youlll 

All our love. 

Grandpa & 
Grandma B. 



Carrie Knack 

CongratuUliontI 

Enjoy your 

grBduation and 

Beit of Luck at Granll 

Love Always, 
Aunt Cindy 



*a«?aeb 




Christina Thul- 

We are all soooo 

proud of you! 

HAPPY GRADUATION! 

& HAPPY BIRTHDAY! 

Love Always, 

Dad, Mom <t Joshua 




Marianne 

Alyssa 

Mitterling, 

Congratulations on 

your achievement! 

Success, love and 

happiness always! 

LRSBSSS 

Love, Mom 



Round Lake 

Senior High 

School 

Christopher 

Blood 

Congratulations 
HOME BOY! 

^1 & 



To Our Daughter, 
Veronica Hughes 

Congratulations on your 
8th grade graduation! 

Love, Dad & Mom 





Congratulations 

and Good Luck 

in CoUege, 

Kristenl 

Love from 

Mom, Dad, 

Sinead, Sean 

&. Grandma 



-•"^■ 



K^ 



Friday. Juno 4. 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 41 



,tl'7^-i>r*''''*»^«T H ' 



•^ ' 



.1' 

s . 

f •' 



GET "IT" OFF 
YOUR CHEST 

(708)223-8073 



upservice: 

IT'S THE TALK OF THE TOWN 




.^i 



(Continued from page 20) 
join the Antioch Fire Department. They would not take 
me because I live in the township not the village. 1 am 
very upset about this and have a lot of experience too. 
They should change these rules, it bothers me. 

Good Work 

I would like to give a great big thanks to the young 
men in Grant Township Highway Department, They 
did an excellent job during the flooding. 

Used Car Lot 

The Mundelein K-Mart is turning into a used car lot. 
Driving down the road, you can see many cars for sale. 
Anywhere from 4 to 10 cars. The store and village 
should clean up their act and tow the cars away that are 
there overnight. 



Cat Watching? 



What kind of ignorant comment is that, "Blame the 
Gat"? How are you supposed to be watching a cat in 
your own yard? Please, give me a break. How would 
like to be put in your backyard and be shot? That was 
cruel and ignorant. How can you watch a cat every 
minute. Get a life "Blame the Cat"! 



Driving Tip 



Lipservice should alert all drivers that school is almost 
over and there will be lots of children outside. We need 
to slow down in our cars and trucks, and remember that 
there arc children all around. 

Antioch Speedway 

It is time for the Antioch Police to keep a better 
watch on the speeding on Route 83 through town. 
Yesterday I was trying to shop in the village and was 
nearly mowed down by motorists. Worse yet, I was 
trying to get my baby out of the car! We need a radar 
trap in town to stop this, I will not shop in the village 
until something is done about it. 



Good Group 



I am calling about Parents without Partners. I think it 
is a wonderful group and the number is 265-0833. 



Who Wants It 

I just read they want to run a bike path through the 
Country Ridge subdivision in Wauconda. They also 
want to put in an overpass. I think this is ridiculous. 
Who wants a bike trail in front of your properly? 
Worse, ihey will become snowmobile paths in the 
winter. 



i*^' . 



Huh? 

Wake up Round Lake Heights. Who is running the 
village? Is it the chicken man or the sewer cover man? 
Good question, huh? 

Poetry Lover 

Roses are red, 
Violets are blue, 
• Poems are unwanted, 
And so are you. 

Ever-ready Election 

'It is unfortunate that the Gumce mayoral campaign is 
still going, and going, and going. The election is over 
and the citizens of Gumee clearly love their mayor. 
Why don't you others'gel over your loss and get a life? 

Voter Warning 

I am from Grayslake and want to comment on the 
first council meeting headed by our new mayor. The 
trustees from the previous mayor denied the new mayor 
her choice of appointees. Just to thwart her! 
Remember, some of you are up for reelection soon. 
The voters will not forget these antics. 

Fishy Story 

I am from Round Lake Park and would like to thank 
the idiot who dumped his fishguts in the parking lot of 
the Round Lake Video. It's nice to know you care! 

Thanks A Lot 

I want to personally thank the juveniles that spray 
painted gang signs all over my rental truck in Round 
Lake. I wish liicsc children's parents would spend more 



lime with Ihcm and leach Uiem more constructive 
things to do. I will not be sorry to move from here. 



Good Program 



I am want to thank Antioch DARE program very 
interesting and helpful. It was fun and inspiring. 



Slow Down 

Hey Lipservice, I think you arc doing a great job. It 
is the only reason I get the paper, t am from Round 
Lake Beach. I want to complain about a certain driver 
on Villa Visui who speeds and has a loud muffler. It is 
an early '60s wagon. Slow it down and put a muffler 
on that piece of junk. There arc kids running around. 

More Barking Dogs 

I live in Round Lake Beach and .agree that there arc 
dogs around that need to be trained not to bark. I live 
on Woodbine and wc have dogs barking at all hours. It 
is rough to get up early in llic morning for work after a 
dog keeps you up all night. You should move to a 
place with a bigger yard so that you are not so close to 
your neighbors. 

Matter of Opinion 

I want 10 know why my message wasn't printed about 
the Holocaust Museum. I think it was a good message. 
It should have been heard. You should have printed it 
instead of all lliis oilier garbage about cats getting shot, 
people gelling mad about signs, and all thai other crap^ 



Hush Money 



Last week when the Omni Store had to be evacuated, I 
told my husband it was only a mailer of lime before 
someone sues. 1 Uiink il was a shame. Of course ihcy 
should pay for that woman's mctiical costs. But, 
everyone is looking for a free ride. I say, "Omni, give 
her a couple of thousand, so she will shul her mouth." 



Those Kind 

I wonder why no newspaper has the guts to print that 
awful letter written to the Antioch Township and also 
to that Reverend? That letter proves what kind of 
people are running the town of Antioch. I'm from 
Antioch 



Public Service 

People need ihc opportunity lo speak their minds. If 
. one person believes a lie, no doubt there arc hundreds of 
others out there with the same mistaken belief. 
Newspapers arc not trusted anymore, so Lipservice 
provides for a real need lo hear from other people. It's 
lalk radio in prim! 

Parents Not Selfish 

All of you parents with healthy children take a look 
at those kids. Now, iry and imagine llial Ihey have any 
kind of handicap and because of dial was not allowed to 
do what all of the oihcr kids around him arc doing. I 
ihink the parents of the kid in the icelcss liockey 
problem arc not sclHsh. They are just trying to do for 
Ihcir kids like everyone else. I am from Round Lake 
Beach and a mother of two. 

Check The Facts 

After reading, "Tlirow The Bums Out" I am reminded 
that ignorance still abounds. Obviously, lliis person 
docs nol know llie facts. I live in Island Lake. 



Wants A Fence 

I was recently denied a fence permit in Island Lake. I 
guess if I was fortunate enough to be a newly elecicd 
village trustee then 1 loo could have a non-conforming 
fence in my backyard. 

What's Going-On? 

What is going on in Lake Villa between the township 
and school board, it sure reeks of backroom politics? 1 
feci like I am back in ihc city. . 

Confused? 

I am calling about the Grayslake cheer leiiding iryouls. 
I understand tJiey had a coach on the panel selecting 
girls who had been asked to sit down due to pcrsonaliiy 
conflicts last year. And, because she was one of Ihc 
judges, llicrc were three senior girls that were on ihc 



iP-^ 



Lakeland 

cwspapcrs 



squad last year Uiat will nol be on next year because of 
her pettiness. 



Nothing Is Fair 



I am from Antioch and upset about the icelcss hockey 
issue. By claiming discrimination, he is actually 
discriminating against our normal kids. That's not fair. 
Kids with disabilities .should be in their own leagues. 
Please don't mix them with our normal, hcallliy kids. 

Another Mans Treasure 

To the person who stole thai ladies orange top willi 
hand painted silver flames and silver and gold hand 
painted scooped "V" neck, I hope when you wear il 
everyone knows you stole if from my garage. 
The sale was during Memorial Day weekend . 

Class Act 

Docs anyone have any information on the Class of '83 
Grant High School reunion? Why are we the only high 
school in Uie norlhcm Illinois area thai has no 
information about their reunion. Arc the class officers 
too busy? Can't ihcy ask for help? 



Wake Up Call 



Wake up Lake Villa. Do we really need two 
supervisors, one getting $27,000 and the other 
524,000? Come on folks, be at llic budget hearing 
June 9 at the township hall to raise hell. I'm from 
Lindenhurst. 



Help 



The reason I am calling is because my wife has Icfl 
mc with two small children. I was wondering if there 
was some group dial docs things for parents like mc 
with small children. I live in Mundelein. 



may simply mean 






thatfltereisno 

* " 

particular virtue 
In doing things the 

waythcy have 
abraj^ been done. 

-Rudolph Flesch 



Are you thinking what 
we're thinking? 

Logo -ago go 



AdveriislnB/Graphlc Services 

P.O. Box 7766 
. Grayslake, I L 60030 

Call for a free brochure 
(708)223-8167 



M 



42 Lakeland Newspapert 



Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



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Friends helping woman to breathe easier 



Take a deep breath. Then let it out. 
Doesn't that feel good? 

Pamela Airth Smith has never been 
able to do that. But she will. 

The 26-year-old resident of Gurnee 
was diagnosed at birth with cystic 
fibrosis. Her life has been a scries of 
lung infections and medical 
treatments. v' 

Pam is one of the luclcy ones. Many 
people born with the disease don't 
malce it to adulthood. 

Now she has a chance for a normal 



\n SI ZIK Ki!:i:i) 

Liiiu'lantl N\\\si)iipi'is 



life. . Her friends and neighbors are 
determined to see that she will have 
one. 

"I want to be able to run upstairs," 
Pam tells her mother who talces care of 
her. 

Presently she is totally dependent 
'on oxygen and suffers continuously 
from headaches, dizziness, shaking 
and frequent lung infections'. 

Pam is waiting for a bilateral lung 
transplant. 

In March she underwent 10 days of 
extensive testing at Barnes Hospital in 
St. Louis to determine if she was a good 
candidate for a transplant, and recently 
received word that she was on the 
waiting list for a set of lungs. 

When the call comes she must fly to 
St. Louis at a moment's notice; she 
won't be able to return home for about 
nine months. 

When Pam and Chuck Smith 
joined the neighborhood In 
Providence Village a couple of years 
ago, no-one was aware of iier 
condition. Then, during a neighbor- 
hood party, she became ill and had to 



be rushed to the hospital. 

"Ail of us were devastated," said 
Debbie Dunn. "Our hearts went out to 
them. They never complained." 

When tiie possibility of a transplant 
came up, Chuck confided to Dennis 
Dunn that they might have to sell their 
home to pay for living expenses during 
her recuperation as well as the 
astronomical medical costs. 

"None of us wanted to see that hap- 
pen," says Debbie. 

Neighbors started calling each 
other. Soon about 35 people got 
together to take action and their 
concern mushroomed into a huge 
network of people wanting to help. 

"When it hits home it touches you in 
a whole different, way," said Nancy 
Sakol, a close neighbor of the Smiths. 

"We're really pulling together. We 
want to give Pammy her life back. The 
simple pleasures people take for 
granted she just doesn't know." 

Sakol has been instrumental In 
getting donations for a silent auction. 

Neighbors Tom. and Debbie 
Memeth have opened an account for 
Pam at the Bank of Waukegan where 
Tom Is an officer. The present balance 
is about $101. 

"We had to set our sights on some 
major fund-ralscrs," says Dunn. She 
and her husband serve as chairpersons 
of the committee. 

A golf tournament in Pam's honor is 
planned for Sunday, August 29, at the 
Midlanc Country Club in Wadsworth. 
The entrance fee of $125 will include a 
meal. Anyone wishing more 
information may call Debbie at 336- 
1666. 

"If You Can't Breathe, Nothing Else 
Matters," is the theme for a dinner 
dance scheduled for September 18 at 





resenting... 



Victory Mammography 
Screening Service 

Our mobile unit will be rolling into your community 

bringing this vital cancer detection service to a 

location near you. In just minutes, skilled health 

care professionals, using the latest and most 

accurate technology, will gently guide you 

through the procedure. 

COMPLETE SCREENING ONLY $60 

Visa and Mastercard accepted. 

Call 1-800-877-XRAY to schedule an appointment. 
Walk-ins also available. 




LOCATTON SCHEDULE 



Time: 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. 



Tuesday, Tune 8 

* 

Victory Medical Buidlng (Walden Square) 

Atkinson at Center Street 
Grayslake, Illinois 



A service of Viciory Memorial HosplLit . 1324 N. Sheridan Raid . W.iukcgnn . 708/360-3000 



the Rosemont Horizon. A silent auction 
will offer a vast array of Items. Tickets 
for that will be $50. Many of the costs 
for the event have already been cither 
donated or vt^alved. 

"Business people have been very re- 
sponsive." says Dunn. 

Sakol adds, "Everyone I've 
contacted wants to do whatever they 
can." 

Gurnee Mayor Dick Wclton has 
added his assistance in a way that will 
involve not only the Immediate 
community but the entire area. 

June 21-24 will be "Shop & Share 
Week" at all Welton's Markets. Shopper 
need only take their cash register tapes 
to the service counter and indicate they 
wish to help Pam. Welton's will donate 
5 percent of the net bill to the fund. 

There are two Welton's stores in 
Gurnee, one in Round Lake, and one in 
Mundclcin. 

The neighborhood kids arc even 
getting into the act 

"All the kids love her," says Dunn, 

About 15 kids from 4 to 9 are plan- 



ning a car wash and lemonade stand. 
The event Is tentatively scheduled for 
June 18 in the parking lot at Providence 
Village. 

Sakol mentioned the plan at the 
local True Value Hardware Store and 
was immediately provided with all the 
supplies the Idds would need. 

"The community is really pulling to- 
gether," she says. 

Both Chuck and' Pam worked at 
Baxter Healthcare Corp. Pam had to 
quit her Job as a financial analyst about 
a year and a half ago. The company has 
told Chuck he can work part of the time 
from Pam's St Louis apartment after 
the surgery. The two have been married 
only two and one-half years. 

"They have been given a dream," 
says Sakol. "She's beat all the odds so 
far." 

Donations and contributions to the 
Pamela Smith Medical Fund may be 
sent to P.O. Box 972, Gienview, IL 
60025-0972. The committee welcomes 
cash and items for the silent auction as 
well and any support or ideas. 



'A celebration of life' arrives 



The Auxiliaiy of Cohdell Medical 
Center has launched a special project 
to address the need for organ and tis- 
sue donations. The program titled, "A 
Celebration of Life" includes a 15 
minute video describing the lives of 
five orgdn recipients. 

The goal of the program is to en- 
courage discussion and understanding 
of the vital need for organ donors. 
More than 26,000 people in the United 
States currently await a transplant and 
someone new is added to the trans- 
plant waiting list every 30 minutes. 



The video takes* a very positive ap- 
proach to this important topic and is 
targeted to an aucUence varying in age 
and ethnic background. Through the 
video the experience of struggle as well 
as the joy each recipient and his/her 
family experience. Viewers feel a part 
of the people's lives and are more 
aware than ever of the need for signing 
donor cards and promoting this 
throughout the community. 

To schedule a viewing for the group, 
contact the Auxiliary office at 362-2905, 
ext 5615. 



ACTIVE FEET NEED CONFORTI 

Get Custom Made Comfort Insoles For: 
•ROLLER BLADES, -•RUNNING SHOES -GOLF SHOES 

CUSTOM ORTHOTICS WITH DRS. PRESCRIPTION 
SEE THE FOOT GEAR SPECIAUSTS AT: 




Please Call For Appointment 

708-329-7505 



B.O.S. LABORATORY 

Custom Shoes And Orthotics 




University of Health Sciences/ 
Chicago Medical School 

* 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago 



THE ROBERT R. McCORMICK 
UNIVERSITY CLINICS 

Lake County's University Group Practice 

PRIMARY CARE AND SPECIALTY SERVICES 



Family Medicine 

Pediatrics 

General Surgery 

Gynecology 

Podiatry 

Urology 

Vascular Surgery 



Allergy Medicine 

Cardiology 

Dermatology 

Endocrinology 

Gastroenterology 

Psychiatry 

Psychology 



473-4357 



••ie:> 



Friday. Juno 4, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 43 



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Lakeland Newspapers' LIFELINE 



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Discover the benefits of legumes 



Love your heart 

by CAROLE STERN 

Finally dried beans, peas, and lentils have been 
elevated to new heights. Once considered humble, 
these legumes have enjoyed a new popularity because 
they are low in fat. If they are combined with grains or 
small amounts of lean meat, poultry, fish and low-fat 
dairy products, legumes are a low-fat, low -cholesterol 
source of protein that also provides fiber. 

Lamb and lentil stew 

vegetable cooking spray 

1 teaspoon olive oil . 
1/4 cup chopped onion 

2 cloves garlic, minced 

3/4 pound lean, boneless leg of lamb, cut into bite- size 

pieces 

2 cups water 

1 1/2 cups canned no-salt added beef broth, divided 1 

cup dried lentils 

2 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon coriander 

1/2 teaspoon rosemary 1/2 teaspoon thyme 

1/2 teaspoon salt 

1/2 teaspoon pepper 

1 1/2 cups peeled, cubed acorn squash (about 1/2 

pound) 1 teaspoon cornstarch 

1 cup yogurt (optional) 

Coat a large Dutch oven with cooking spray; add 
olive oil and place over medium heat until hot. Add 
onion and garlic, and saut6 2 minutes or until tender. 

Add lamb, and cook 5 minutes, browning on all 
sides. Add water, 1 cup beef broth, lentils, cumin, 
coriander, rosemary, thyme, salt and pepper. Bring 
mixture to a boil; cover, reduce heat, and sixruner 15 
minutes. 

Add cubed acorn squash, and simmer an additional 
30 minutes or until lamb is tender. 

Combine cornstarch and remaining 1/2 cup 
beef broth; add to lamb mixture, stirring well. Bring 
mixture to a boil, and cook 1 minute. Ladle stew into 
bowls. Top with yogurt if desired. 
Serves: 5 Per serving: 
Cholesterol (mg) 50 Fat (gm) 5.6 Calories 287 

Spanish picadillo 

Black beans add richness to this Spanish inspired 
meat and vegetable dish. 
1/2 cup dried black beans 

2 cups water 
1 pound ground chuck 
vegetable cooking spray 

1 (14 1/2 ounce) can no salt -added whole tomatoes, 
undrafned and chopped 



2 teaspoons vegetable oil 
1/2 cup chopped onion 
2 cloves garlic, minced 



City plans to host 
awareness day 



The city of Highland 
Park will host their annual 
Disability Awareness Day in 
Highland Park, June 6 from 
11a.m. to 5 p.m. on Central 
between First and Second 
Street at Port Clinton in the 
Plaza. 

It will be 'a fun-fillcd 
family day. The event will 
highlight the accomplish- 
ments and chalicngcs of 
persons with disabilities. 

The Chicago Wheelchair 
Bulls, Lady Wheelchair 
Basketball Players, will per- 
form for the audience. 
Vandenbcrg's will supply 
free blood pressure tests. 
The Root Beer Float Man — 
Mr. Dick Chase and the 
Italian Ice Man — Mr. Ray 
lozzo as well* as Lambs 
Farm will provide delicious 
items to be purchased and 
enjoyed. 

Nancy Fregin from the 
American Society of Artists 
will provide an Arts and 
Craft Experience along widi 
other displays of crafts. 

For additional informa- 



tion please call Phyllis 
Wood at 433-0918 or Candy 
Wood at 831 -3079. 



708-688-HELP 



The Victory if you or 

_- , I someone 

Memorial you love 

is 
struggling 

Dependency with an 

DMftr^iM alcohol or 

Program ^mg 

addiction, b single phone 
call can put you in touch 
with the professional, 
conndcntiai help you need. 
Don't wait another day - 
make the call that can 
change your life. 



Hospital 




Victory 

Memorial 

Hospital 



1324 North Sheridan Rd. 
Waukegan, IL 60085 




B 



Adult & Pediatric Allergy 



DR. DANIEL YAMSHON 




AS-mMA 
HAY FEVER 
ECZEMA 



'HIVES 

'HEADACHES 
'FOOD ALLERGY 



FREE ALLERGY SCREENING 



Buffalo Grove Round Lake Beach 
ISOf^alfDayRd. 2 East Rollins Rd. 
(708)913-0300 (708)546-5800 

24 Hour Ana. Service f312) 989-8729 




1 (4-ounce] can chopped green chllles, drained 
1/3 cup chopped green pepper 

1/2 teaspoon salt 

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 

1/2 teaspoon pepper 

1/4 teaspoon ground cloves 

1/4 teaspoon allspice 

1/2 teaspoon grated orange rind 

1/8 teaspoon 

Tabasco sauce 

2 cups peeled, chopped cooking apple (Granny Smith) 
tablespoon cllantro, chopped 

3 cups hot cooked long-grain rice (cooked without salt) 

Drain beans, add 2 cups water. Bring to a boll; cover, 
reduce heat, and simmer 3 1/2 hours or until beans are 
tender. Drain and set aside. Cook meat in a skillet over 
medium heat until browned, to crumble. Drain 

in a colander; pat dry with paper towels, and set aside. 
Wipe drippings from skillet with a paper towel. Coat 
skillet with cooking spray; add oil, and place over 
medium heat until hot Add onion and garlic; saut6 2 
minutes or until tender. 

Return meat to skillet. Add tomatoes and next 9 
ingredients . Bring to a boil; reduce heat, and simmer, 
uncovered, 15 minutes. Add beans and apple; cook 10 
minutes or until heated, stirring occasionally. Top with 
cllantro and serve over rice. 

Serves: 6 Per serving: Cholesterol (mg) 44 Fat (gm) 
12,6 Calories 395 



Victory opens in 
Grayslake, June 7 

Primary care physi- The Victory Medical 

cians and convenient pre- Building will also include 

surgical and diagnostic laboratory and diagnostic 

healthcare are coining to space for general x-rays, 



the Grayslake area. On 
June 7, the new Victory 
Medical Building will 
open its doors at 100 N. 
Atkinson Rd., Suite 1> 
Grayslake. 

..The new facility an- 
chors the Walden Square 
commercial develop- 
ment. With over 12,000 
feet of lease office space, 
the Victory Medical Build- 



fetal and ab dominal ultra- 
sound examinations, 
electrocardiograms 
(EKG's), and pre-surgery 
testing (including labora- 
tory blood draws). The 
first floor also includes a 
combined waiting room. 
Mammography services 
will be available through 
the Victory Mobile Mam- 
mography Van on the 



ing will include six inde- second Tuesday of each 
pendent physicians' of- month, beginning June 8. 



fices. Practices include 
internal medicine, pedi- 
atrics, and obstetrics and 
gynecology. Information 
on these physicians and 
their practices is available 
by calling Victory's free 
Physician Referral Service 
at 360-4101. 



The Victory Medical 
Building is affiliated vdth 
Victory Memorial Hospi- 
tal, Waukegan. For further 
information on the ser- 
vices available at the 
Grayslake facility, call Vic- 
tory's Community Rela- 
tions dept. at 360-4246. 




Our experienced physicians, nurses, technicians and acute care coordinators are 
specially trained in critical care. And, the Acute Care Team brings hospital services 
with our personalized touch right to your doorstep. We're here from 8 am to 10 pm 
every day with on-siie X-ray and laboratory services for fast diagnosis and 
economical, convenient care. Many corporations have discovered that the Acute Care 
Center is a valuable resource for their workers' health— for both injury and preventive 
medicine. The team works directly with your family physician to assure your 
continued recovery. And when needed, Condell Medical Center, with Level II Trauma 
Center and full-service hospital, is only minutes away. So when you need help, get the 
help you need at Condell Acute Care Centers. 

Gbndell Acute Care Center 



6 PhUlip Rd., Vemon Hills 

(708) 680-0500 



2 E. Rollins Rd., Round Lake Beach 



(708) 740-2500 



LK 

rcjtgss Condoll Medical Center 



When Every Minute Counts 

Atnilatod with Condoll Medcal Conler, Uberlyville, IL 



Bring In this ad 
for a free gift. 



44 Lakotand Newipapert 



Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



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Lakeland Newspapers' LIFELINE 




Meet your corporate neighbor walk 

In recognition of National Employee. Health and Fitness Day, NutraSweet 
Employees invited their corporate neighbors for a two-mile fitness 'wall<. 
More than 1 ,000 employees wanned up and participated in the fitness walk. 



Fellowship program 
underway at Allendsde 



'fT 



Allendale Association, an DHnois State 
Board of Education approved private 
school and Illinois licensed child welfare 
agency, in cooperation with the Univer- 
sity of Illinois, is participating in a fellow- 
ship training program for psychiatrists 
specializing In ctiUd and adolescent psy- 
ctiiatry. 

Four fellows are each spending a 
three-month rotation at Allendale's resi- 
dential, therapeutic, educational treat- 
ment center in Lake Villa 

Allendale is the only private not-for- 
profit agency accredited by both the Joint 
Conmilsslon on Accreditation of Psy- 
chiatric Facilities for Children and Ado- 
- lescents and the Council on Accreditation 
of Services for Families and Children, Inc. 

Allendale Is a treatment center for 



emotionally disturbed children. Many of 
the children, ages eight to 18, are victims 
of physical or sexual abuse or neglect, or 
suffer from severe behavior disorders. Al- 
lendale serves this population through 
residential treatment, special education 
programs, specialized foster care and an 
outpatient counseling center. More than 
600 children and their fEunilies are helped 
each year. Qiildren come from through- 
out Illinois with concentrations from 
Lake, Cook and McHenry counties. 

Allendale Assn. kicked off a capital 
campaign in 1992 with a goal of over $8 
miUion. To' date, with generous pledges 
and donations, it has raised $5.9 million. 

For information regarding the capital 
campaign or programs, contact Allendale 
Assn.* at 356-2351. 



Abbott Laboratories supports 
program for mentally ill 



Abbott Laboratories has sent Inde- 
pendence Center a $5,000 check along 
with a conmiitment for an additional 
$5,000 check next year. These funds 
will help the Center continue to serve 
the needs of Lake County residents 
who have mental illness. 

Abbott helped Independence Cen- 
ter open in 1989 with a "start-up" grant, 
and since that time, has helped the 
Center in many ways. The company 
has participated in Independence 
Center's Transitional Employment 



Program, helped to recruit volunteers, 
and donated a variety of furniture. 

Independence Center provides re- 
habilitation for persons with mental ill- 
ness by providing job training, social- 
ization, and support Hie program uses 
a model in which the mentally ill are 
considered members of a club rather 
than a "client" or "patient" General 
work skills are learned as members 
participate in the operation of the Cen- 
ter. Members can then be placed on 
jobs in the community. 



X\' 



Lake Forest is 
trauma center 



The Illinois Dept of 
Public Health awarded 
Lake Forest Hospital redes- 
ignation as a Level II 
Trauma Center — dedicated 
to providing optimal care to 
trauma patients. The IDPH 
is confident that the hospi- 
td will continue to provide 
quality trauma care and as- 
sistant in the overall coor- 
dination of the delivery of 



trauma patient care in Lake 
County. 

Lake Forest Hospital 
handled close to 18,000 
emergency cases in 1992. 
Eight percent of the emer- 
gency room nurses are 
Trauma Nurse Specialized 
and the physicians are all 
board certified or qualified 
by the American Board of 
Emergency Medicine. 



Quit Smoking 
In 60 Minutes 

$3000 



Oafy 



No Weight Gain" 




By Individual Appointment 
One Year Guarantee 

Call for 

Information 356-2675 or 1-800-310-2675 



James R. Baker 

Certified 
Hypnotherapist 



Let State Farm 
Anchor Your 
Boat Insurance 
Needs... 
Good Service 
At A Good Price 




DICK WITT 

894 Hillside, Antioch 

395-1089 



Like ■ good ndghbor. 
Sute Fiim is ihoc® 






IHIUtANtl 



State Farm Fire 

and Casualty Company 

Home Office: 

Bloomlngton, Illinois 



Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



• ■ _ « » 

"It was 2 a.m. and my daughter had a 
103' fever, I called ASK-A-NURSE." 



44 As a new mom, I need reassurance about the best way to care for my daughter. It's a relief 
to know that Saint Tiierese can help answer health care questions day or night. Thank you 
Saint Therese for this wonderful and much-needed service. W 

"Sue Basinger and her daughter of Lindenhurst 




Saint Therese Medical gk^ww Mk ikil iff^^i" staffed by registered nurses 

Center's ASK-A-NURSE is a /\SlvA^|\IUR5C who are specially trained to 

free 24-hour health infer- ^^^^^^^^^^^^-^i^^— help you find a physician, and 

mation and physician referral '^ / i /| CJ C\ f\ f\ provide health care 

service. ASK-A-NURSE is ^ \ V ^^ ^\J\J information. " 




Saint Therese Medical Center 



t> 1992, Saml Tlioicso Modical Center 



A Division orpranciscan Sisicrs llc.ihh Care Corporation 

2615 VVasliinguin Slrccl 

Waukcgan, Illinois 60085 

Telephone 708.249,3900 



Lakeland Newspaper«45 



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Lakeland Newspapers' LIFELINE 



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^4 




brthem Illinois 
ledicdl Center 



MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS— The monthly meeting of the 
McHenry County MS Support Group will take place at 
7:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 8 at Northern Illinois Medical 
Center (NIMC). NIMC is located at Rte. 31 and BuU Val- 
ley Rd., McHenry. The meeting includes the showing of 
a video by Dr. Tony Reder, neurologist, Chicago Medi- 
cal Center, titled "research Update: Beta Interferon." For 
more information, call Marilyn at 639-4277 or the 
Chicago-Northern Illinois Chapter, National Multiple 
Sclerosis Society, at (312)922-8000. 



paaonal therapists. Costs may be covered *by Medicare, Grandparents class, open to the public, provides Inf or - 
Medicaid and most insurance programs. mation on the changes in pregnancy and child-rearing 

that have occurred in recent years. Held at 7:30 p.m. at 
Condell Medical Center, 900 Garfield Ave., Libertyville. 
Although there is no fee, registration is required. Call 
362-2905, ext, 5275, to register. 



Condell Medical 
Center 



^aint Therese 
' Hospital ~ 



CHOLESTEROL SCREENINGS— Low-cost cholesterol 
screenings will be offered on June 7, 9 to 11 a.m., at the 
Iieart Center of Lake County, St. Therese Medical Cen- 
ter. These screening include interpretation of results, 
educational materials on cholesterol treatment, cardio- 
vascular disease and other pertinent topics. A registered 
dietitian and other health professionals will be avail- 
able for questions. This program is open to the public. A 
$5 fee will be charged. For more information or to regis- 
ter, call St. Therese ASK-A-NURSE at 244-5900. 

HOME HEALTH CARE— Home health care services are 
available through St. Therese Medical Center, 360-2480. 
The program provides nurses, aides, beautician and 
social worker services plus physical, speech and occu- 



GOLF OPEN— Friday, June 4 the Auxiliary of Condell 
Medical Center will hold its annual Golf Open at Mid- 
lane Country Club in Wadsworth. The all-day event will 
benefit the Oncology/Hematology Center at Condell 
Medical Center in Libertyville. There will be shotgun 
starts at 7:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. and an exhibition by golf 
professional Peter Long at noon. Dirmer featuring en- 
tertainment and a silent and live auction begins with 
cocktails at 5:30 p.m. For registration and other infor- 
mation, call 362-2905, ext. 5678. 

KARING FOR KIDS— Karing for Kids, a free two-session 
course for the new baby sitter, held at Condell' s Allen 
Conference Center, 700 Garfield Ave., Libertyville. Since 
the new baby sitter will be certified by the American Red 
Cross, participants must be 11 years of age or older. 
Participants will also complete two hours of clinical ex- 
perience in Centre Club's child care center. This course 
will be held from 8 a.m. to noon. For information, or to 
register, call the Department of Public Relations and 
Marketing, at 362-2905, ext. 5275. 

SURVIVORS DAY— Sunday, June 6 the Condell Medical 
Center will host the annual Survivors Day of cancer pa- 
tients, and their families and friends from 2 to 4 p.m. at 
the AJlen Conference Center located on the Condell 
campus, 700 Garfield Ave,, Libertyville. 

GRANDPARENTS CLASS— Tuesday, June 8 a free 



Victory Memorial 
/ Hospital 



HEALTH FAIR — On Sunday, June 6 from noon to 4 p.m., 
help celebrate the grand opening of the Victory Medical 
Bldg., located in Walden Square (the corners of Atkin- 
son Rd. and Center St.) in Grayslake. The health fair will 
offer free health screenings, displays/demonstrations 
and activities for the whole family. For further 
information call l-BOO-THE-CHOICE (1-800-843-2464). 

MAMMOGRAPHY SERVICES— The Victory Memorial 
Hospital Mobile Mammography Service makes it con- 
venient for area women to have routine breast cancer 
screenings. On June 11 and 25 from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m., 
the mobile mammography van v/ill be at the Venture 
Store, 2700 Belvidere Rd., Waukegan. The cost is $60 
which is covered by most insurance. The schedule an 
appointment, call 1-800-877-XRAY. 

SCREENINGS— Every Monday except holidays, 8 a.m. 
to noon, free blood pressure screening and recording is 
held at Victory Memorial Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan 
Rd., Waukegan. The first and third Mondays 1 to 3 p.m., 
free blood pressure screening and recording is held at 
Victory Memorial Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd., 
Waukegan. Call 360-4127 for information. 



WeLcome 
WAqoN 

Helpful Civic infor- 
mation to acquaint 
you with your com- 
munity. Call ttie Wel- 
come Wagon repre- 
sentative so that she 
may visit you. 

Grayslake 
Wildwood 
Lake Villa 

Viola Linda 

336-5971 223-1607 



Lindenhurst 

Sandy 
356-2012 



Gumee 

Patty 
223-6498 



Mundelein 

Laurie 
566-1653 



Lincolnshire 

Letty 
945-3161 

Lake ZuricK 

Jeanette 
438-9049 

Long Grove 

Kildeer 

Havfthorn 

Woods 

Kay 
540-8977 

Libertyville 

Sally 
680-1599 

You are entitled to 
a complimentary 
subscription from 
your hometown 
newspaper. To re- 
ceive your paper, 
contact your Wel- 
come Wagon repre- 
sentative or call 
Lakeland Newspa- 
pers at (708) 223- 
8161. 



BRING THE WHOLE rAMI|.Y! 
COME TO THE HEALTH lAlR IN GRAYSLAKE 



M0^^i^m;^ 





Get happy. Get healthy. Enjoy a Sunday strictly dedicated to feeling good. 

Celebrate the grand opening of the Victory Medical Building in Grayslake. Located in Walden 

Square, on the comer of Center and Atkinson in Grayslake, this new facility offers state of the art 

health care, family physicians, and diagnostic testing right in your own backyard. 



SUNDAY, JUNE 6*12 NOON TO 4PIVI 



FREE HEALTH SCREENINGS 

Blood pressure screening. The symptoms of high blood pressure are ofien 

silent. Be sure your blood pressure is checked periodically. 

Chole^eroi screening. A simple blood lest will let you know your total 

cholesterol level. 

Blood sugar screening for diabetes. Determine your blood sugorlevel and 

the risk factors for diabetes. 

Pulse oximetry. Check for respiratory problems by measuring the oxygen 

saturation in your blood. 

Glaucoma screening. A simple test will determine the level of 

pressure in your eye. High pressure may indicate glaucoma. 





DISPLAYS /DEMONSTRATIONS 



niioH^ 



tflOH- 



Cancer Prevention. Learn the proper technique for 
breast self-examination and the importance of early 
detection. Also, tour Victory's Mobile Mammography 
Unit. Males will learn how to perform testicular self- 
examination, which should be done monthly by men 1 8-38. 
Information about prostate cancer will also be available. 
Look Inside the Human Heart. Using a three-dimensional heart 
display, learn how your heart functions. 

Complimentary Non-Alcoholic Punch. Slop by for some delicious and 
thirst-quenching punch which demonstrates how to enjoy a social situation 
without drugs or alcohol. Recipes for the punch and information about 
"signs and symptoms" of chemical dependency will also be available, 



roi* 






Weight Control: New Directions and Lifesteps. Leam about two effective 
weight management programs that have. helped many people reach and 
maintain their ideal weight. 
Step Aerobics. 15-minute demonstrations at 12, 1 and 2 pm. 

FUN ACTIVITIES FOR THE FAMILY 

"Child Identification Program." We'll record your child's ; 

height, weight, fingerprint and photograph on a personalized 

I. D. card. 

Bike Safety Check. Members of the Grayslake Police Department will 

perform the safely checks from 12:00-1:00 pm. 

Teddy Bear Clinic. Your child can bring stuffed animals and dolls to 
be examined and "treated" by a nurse. 

Heart Activity Readout. Receive a unique souvenir showing 
your heart activity. 

Peanut^ Booth. 'The Psychiatrist Is In." Get a free 
"stress dot" and learn about stress and anxiety. 
Ambulance Tours. Sponsored by Grayslake Rescue 
Squad and TEK Ambulance, 

FREE GIVEAWAYS, PRIZES* 
DRAWINGS AND REFRESHMENTS 



tttfo 



S^^cHOtce 



—%- 



Wmhlnglon 



® 



Cimter Siroct 



® 



BolvktorB 



Choose Victory for all of your health care needs. 




VICTORY MEDICAL BUILDING 

/ Waltlcn Squiirc • 100 N. Atkinson Road (Alkinson at Center) • Suite 1 • Gruy.slakc 
Afniiatcd Willi Victory Memorial Hospital and Health Services 



46 latoland Now»papers 



Friday, Juno 4. 1993 






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Patriot pals top Bison buddies in regional finale 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The last time Stevenson won a baseball 
regional championship, the likes of Rob 
Piggott, David Powers, Pete Turnbill 
would not think anything of playing a 
recreational game of baseball with J.D. 
Blackburn, Brian Romes or Josh Paul. 

For they were all youngsters competing 
in Buffalo Grove baseball at the time as 
sixth-graders. But time and school bound- 
aries have a way of changing outlooks and 
the players who went on to the Stevenson 
program had a far better outlook_jbout 
themselves following an 11-0 win. 

"I played against almost all those guys 
on that team," Mark Piggott said. 

"It feels great to beat them after they beat 
us the last two years," Stevenson's Kevin 
Fredrick said. 

Fredrick is a pitcher and hitter on a tear. 
He followed an ll-strikeout day in a 1-0 
win over Deerfield with 10 more against 
the Bison in five innings. 

"My Dad helped me a lot," Mark Piggott 
said. 

"At the beginning of the year, we were 
all just there. At the midway portion of 
the season, we began to jell. Now we are 
all together. No one is selfish on the 
team," he said. 

Piggott had three singles in the 10-htt at- 

( Continued on Page 54) 




Stevenson's baseball team celebrates after taking the regional championship. — Photo by Steve Peterson 



Wildcats find curious ways to claim another regional 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

The Elgin baseball coach who attended 
the Libertyville-Carmel regional final 
baseball game may still be shaking his 
head. 

The scouting report on the Libertyville 
baseball team heading into the Harrington 
sectional game Saturday, June 5 may read 
something like this: Keep the game to 
seven innings and keep the arguments to a 
minimum. If you don't, yuo could see the 
Wildcats playing Monday for the right to 
play in the state finals. 

For the second time in as many games, 
the Wildcats won with an unusual style of 
baseball. The 3-2, 10 inning win over 



Carmel was made possible due to a balk 
call on Carmel pitcher Brian Buckingham. 
That scored Matt Bemthal, who started the 
frame with a walk. 

And this came on the heals of a wild. 
14-inning, 4-2 win over Waukegan in the 
semifinals. 

"I think having the game we did Satur- 
day helped us. It showed we could win one 
like that," Libertyville Coach Jim Panther 
said. 

The balk call came in the 10th with Bob 
Paulson at the plate. Moments before, 
there was an interference call which was at 
one time termed a rundown and a second 
out was called. Bemthal was sent back to 
(Continued on Page 53) 



Stevenson^s Joyce sets 
sights on national meets 




by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

It had been some 60 hours after Pat Joyce 
had competed in the 1,600-meter run at 
Eastern Illinois University in Charleston. 

"I'm looking back and it is kind of sad to 
think all my running days are over at 
Stevenson," Joyce said. 

Bound for North Carolina State Univer- 
sity next fall, the Stevenson standout will 
be looking for national rankings. His next 
challenge will be the Keebler track and 
field meet, an invitational affair. 

Joyce may soon find himself in a new 
arena of running. "They want to expose 
me to some international races. I hope to 
be their third or fourth runner on the cross 
country team," he said. 

The Stevenson distance king completed 
his prep career with a bang, defending his 
title in the 3,260-meter run with a 9:02.7. 
Some 90 minutes with the spotlight still 
warm; he finished second in the 1 ,600-me- 
ter run with a 4:17:36. Those two finishes 
earned Stevenson 1 1 points and a tie for 
seventh place in the Class AA meet. 

"The 3,200 and 1,600 meters is the most 
difficult double in track. I just keep think- 
ing about running. Ever since my fresh- 



man year, I wanted to win a state title," 
Joyce said. 

"It is a totally different atmosphere at the 
stale meet," Stevenson coach Hank An- 
drew said. 

Joyce credits his father, Bob, with most 
of the insipiration. 

"He ran his usual race. He was far ahead 
of the field," Andrew said. 

Joyce led the 1,600 most of the way be- 
fore being caught and passed by Elliott 
Nolt of Normal. 

Libertyville's Chris Brown continued to 
challenge Joyce to the end. He was third in 
the 3,200 with a 9:15.6. 

Libertyville's 3,200-meter relay team of 
Mike Schneiders. Jeff Zemalis, Mike 
Crane and Nate Wesiin finished seventh 
with an 8:03.36 in the finals. That gave 
the Wildcats eight points and a tie for 26th 
place. 

Westin was lOlh in the state in the 

1.600. 

Lake Zurich hurdling specialist John 
Christensen was fifih in the 300 with a 
38.9 and ninth in the 1 10 with a 14:85. 

Aaron Bell of Antioch qualified for the 
finals in the high jump in his first year of 
track. 



Libertyville shortstop Adam Jacobsen applies the tag to Grayslake's Jason 
Heinemann during a 3-1 Wildcat win in the regional opener. — Photo by Gene 
Gabry 



Mundelein offense hitting 
on all cylinders in regional 



Stevenson, Carmel and now Lake Forest 
all have something in common. 

The three softball teams have been vic- 
timized by what is a tradition in these 
parts — Mundelein scoring the big inning 
when it had to. 

The Mustangs did just that agmnst Lake 
Forest in the regional final Tuesday, scor- 
ing nine runs in the sixth inning for a 10- 
win. The victory advanced the Mustangs 
(27-4) to a battle with Woodstock in a 10 
a.m. game at Barringlon sectional Satur- 
day June 5. Woodstock upset Johnsburg 4- 
3. 

"We have been hitting the ball real well 
and this is a nice time of year to be doing 
that," Mundelein coach Perry Wilhelm 
said. 



The Mustangs are led by Terilyn 
Starkey, who was hitting .560 but did not 
get an official at-bat against the Scouts. 
Lake Forest pitcher Kelli Beckwith gave 
her four intentional passes. 

Mundelein scored the only run it would 
need in the first inning. 

Tiffany Campbell led the way with 3 for 
4 with three RB Is. 

Lindsey Prezell was steady .again on the 
mound, surrendering just two hits and 
notching three strikeouts. 

"We're just taking it one game at a time 
and keeping focused," Wilhelm said. 

Mundelein beat crosstown rival Carmel 
9-1 on a three-run third and Stevenson 10- 
0. Carmel had defeated Waukegan in first 
round action. 



«i^j' 



993 



Friday, Jun« 4, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 47 



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Wildcat kickers adjust, gain shot at mighty Bison 



Libertyville*s soccer team probably 
realized early on ihc contest with Steven- 
son would not be one in which records 
would be set in a high-scoring affair. 
So the Wildcats (16-5) adjusted to the 
Stevenson defense and made goals by 
Kristin Bachochin and Alison Marquardt 
stand up in a 2-0 sectional semifinal win. 
Liberty ville faced its old foe, Buffalo 
Grove, in the sectional final. 

"When we saw them go to double 
sweeper, Jeff (McKenzie, assistant coach) 
and T knew it was not going to be a high- 
scoring game. They are packing it back. 
We were happy to get one and we got two. 
You have to keep pressure on them. We 
were keeping the ball in their back third or 
in the middle third wc thought we were go- 
ing to win the game," Libertyville coach 
Andy Bitta said. 

"We were just trying to go out there and 
get a couple of goals from the beginning," 
said Bachochin, a senior. 

Bachochin took a crossing pass from ju- 
nior Angle DalBelio and beat Stevenson 
goalie Jessica Campbell from close range 
at the 22:47 mark. 

The second-half goal was by Marquardt. 
Marquardt scored on an unusual play in 
which the ball slipped off Campbell's 
hands and into the net after the goalie had 
apparently stopped the shot 

"Angle got the ball on the far post and 
got it across and there was Kristin on the 
far post waiting for her. She had a nice 
goal today," Bitta said. 

"Sooner or later, you will get a cheapie. 
But as my friends the soccer coaches say as 
long as it crosses the line, it doesn't mat- 
ter. When you have some great opportuni- 
ties and hit the post and have one of those, 
you take it," Bitta said of the second score. 

Mary Zurek continued to play solid in 
goalie. Stevenson had a chance in the first 
half on a Julie Kabb breakaway, but it 



went wide of the net. 

The goal was Bachochin's fourth of the 
season and brought on a feeling of antici- 
pation as the sectional final approached. 

"We are totally looking forward to play- 
ing them. We want to get those early 
goals," Bachochin said. 

Shutouts are commonplace for the Wild- 
cats, who won their regional final with a 
4-0 whitewash of Prospect. Stevenson's 
leader, Kabb, was not a factor. Scoring in 
the win over Prospect was DalBelio with 
three goals, Amy Cooper netting the 
fourth. 

"Everyone was toally marking up on 
their players. Our defense has always been 
awesome," Bachochin said. 

Stevenson, the third seed, advanced to the 
sectional round against the top seed with a 
hard-fought 2-1 win over Hersey, Coach 
Randy Anderson's team reached the .500 
mark at 10-1 1-3 despite playing the best 
competition. 

"We played a tough schedule this year. 
We did not feel we played that bad. We 
stayed with the game plan. We made a 
couple of critical mistakes. That was the 
difference. We had some great opportuni- 
ties in the first half," Anderson said. 

Even down 1-0 at halftime, Anderson's 
forces did not feel themselves out of it. 

"The way we played Libertyville last year 
and the way we played them this year (a 3- 
1 regular season loss); it was totally dom- 
inated by them last year," Anderson said. 

While Stevenson's Kabb was being held 
in check by the Libertyville defense, the 
Wildcats' Kelly Karl faced the same fate at 
the other end. 

"I thought Alison Souderlund and Judy 
Karolvsky did an excellent job of bottling 
her up," Anderson-said. "I thought they did 
a goud job. We had a lot of young kids out 
there so we are looking to the future. 

"Against a good team, you have to take 



Mundelein to miss Rosses, 
but forecast remains bright 



Mundelein's soccer team was forced out 
of the Stevenson sectional tournament by 
Buffalo Grove, but Coach Dave Ekstrom 
& Co. will have plenty of memories of 
the 1993 season. 

They begin with the accomplishments 
of reaching sectional level for the second 
straight year; gaining the most wins (13) 
and goals in school history. And of 
course, there is J.J. Ross. 

Ross, a senior, finished v/ith 46 goals, 
and herself and her sister, Jamie, are now 
pondering college choices after Buffalo 
Grove shutout the Mustangs 5-0. 

Mundelein won its second regional title 
with a 4-1 win over Deerfield after a 9-1 
v/in over Maine West. 

It should seem fitting, then, it was J.J. 
Ross who had the Mustangs best chance, 
in the first half when ihe match with the 
Bison was still in doubt. "I thought it 
was wide myself. They controlled the 
game," Mundelein Coach Dave Eckstrom 



said. "We did our best; we got beat by a 
better team." 

Megan McBride scored two Buffalo 
Grove goals and Chissy DelCreko also 
contributed. 

"We try not to super-mark anybody, but 
we wanted to control midfield and keep 
the ball from her," Buffalo Grove Coach 
Tom Ford said. 

While the Ross sisters take their con- 
siderable skills with them when they 
graduate, the Mustangs have plenty to 
build on. Sophomore Stephanie Parker is 
back at goalie. Becky Gradecki returns at 
midfield. 

"Her season was overlooked because of 
what Ross did," Eckstrom said. 

In the Deerfield match, Ross had two 
goals, and Jenny Davignon and Becky 
Straub one each. 

Elsewhere, at the Conant sectional, 
Lake Zurich saw its season come to an 
end with a 4-0 loss to Palatine Fremd in 
the regional final. 



Netting 10 wins something 
to build on for Rams soccer 



Grayslake's soccer team will remember 
reaching double digits in wins as the 
highlight of the 1993 season. 

The Rams finished at 10-3-1 following a 
7-1 defeat at the hands of Hersey in the 
first round of the Stevenson sectional. 

'!It was a wild ride, I'm still happy with 
the record," Coach Joe Martinez said. 

The Rams were a tired bunch in the final 
week of the regular season which saw a 4- 
3 loss to Lake Forest, a 4-2 win over 
Lake Forest Academy and a 4-3 win over 
Cary-Grove. 

Senior Allison Waldenstrom scored all 
four goals against Gary. "She was being 
double and triple-teamed," Martinez said. 



The game winner came on a pass from 
30 yards to 18 yards from Sheri Kri- 
towski. "Allison put it in from the left 
side to the right comer of the net," the 
coach described. 

Waldenstrom had three goals and Chenoa 
Chebny one in the win over LFA. 

"It was a dynamic combination," Mar- 
tinez said of Chebny- Waldenstrom. 

Chebny scored despite a leg injury. 
Stephanie Smith was suffering from an 
ankle injury. 

"LFA was much belter than the last lime 
we played them," Martinez said, 

Goalie Toni Gales slopped 16 of 18 
shots. 










Libertyville's Jenna Sorensen battles Prospect players for control during re- 
gional final match. Libertyville won 4-0 and went on to down Stevenson In sec- 
tional semifinals. — Photo by Gene Gabry. 



advantage of your opportunities and we did 
not take advantage of the opportunities," 
Anderson said. "We have tried different 
systems of play. Even when we came out 
of a 4-3-3 for another striker up front, we 
were creating more than we were out of the 
other. I can't fault our kids." 
While Libertyville had another shot at the 



team which denied them two straight state 
titles, Stevenson looked to 1994 with ju- 
nior midfielder-striker Lisa Cholak; junior 
Jenna Letofsky at midfield-striker; fresh- 
man striker Tricia De Clark who scored 
against Hersey; sophomore defender Soud- 
erlund; junior midfielder-striker Leanna 
Wolowicsz and goalie Campbell reluming. 



Bison bite Wildcats again 



When you see Libertyville girls soc- 
cer coach Andy Bitta this offseason, it 
could be word to the wise not to men- 
tion the "BG Word". 

That means Buffalo Grove and the 
mighty Bison, The Bison eliminated 
Libertyville 2-1 in the sectional final 
round at Stevenson Tuesday night. 

"They played very well and I was up- 
set with the way we played. Our pass- 
ing was not sharp and a couple of mis- 
takes cost us dearly," Bitta said. 

Julie Collins and Meghan McBride 



scored for the Bison (18-0-1). Erica 
Chung spoiled the Bison's bid for their 
19th straight shutout with a goal with 
50 seconds to go. 

It was the second straight year Buf- 
falo Grove had eliminated the Wild- 
cats. Libertyville finishes the season 
16-6. 

"We had a very good year. Wc have 
13 juniors and three sophomores back. 
We have a lot to work with," Bitta 
said. 




Reach for the sky 



Stevenson's Kevin Keller goes for the point during state volleyball tourney 
action against Libertyville. The Pats won this match 15-9, 8-15, 15-6 but fell 
to Glenbrook North 15-1, 15-2 in the sectional finale. — Photo by Gene 
Gabry 






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993 



NWSC names all-acadeiiiic athletes for * 93 spring season 



Northwest Suburban Conference offi- 
cials have ^nounced the all-league aca- 
demic teams for this spring, 

NWSC AH-Academic 
Teams Spring 1993 

Grant (G), Grayslake (GL), Johnsburg 
(J), Marian Central (MC), Round Lake 
(RL), Wauconda (W). 

Baseball 

CHnl Rodriguez (RL), George Downs (MC), 
Pnul Dorr (OL), David Lipinski (G), Malt Mctzc (J), 
Steve Lingic (J), Kurt Vannlstine (W), Chris Lalor 
(MC), Marc Himelstein (OL), Matt Abramavicius 
(MC), Gerry Wicczorcfc (J), Justin Fleming (RL), 
Andy Lobo (MC), Jamie Hoffman (RL), Tim Lalor 
(MC), Brcnt Burris (RL), Brelt Bending (G), Doug 
While (MC). 

Honorable mention 

Brian Amcrson (J), David Musscr (W), Steve 
Waldo (W), Ryan Bauer (RL), Dan Dunlavy (G), 
Steve Knczcvic (J), Ryan Irwin (J), David Stone 
(G), Todd Alfred (GL), Jeff Russ (G), Troy Rtlcy (J). 
Eric Doud (W), Scott Schupp (GL), David Bass 
(RL). 

Softball 

Amanda Devoy (J), BarbaraKaczmoryn (RL), 



Sunday 
National 

w 

Itewlltt Packard j 

N. III. Mechanical 4 

Rebels 4 

Euro-Tan 3 

Big Sljcks 2 

4-Coyncs 2 

Garrison's Septic 2 

Chiefs 1 

Stack-On Producu I 

American 

w 

Rodger Rabbit 4 

Midnight Blue 4 

Carter Hoff.-Jokcrs Wild 4 

MSH AulomoUvc 4 

Quill Corp. 3 

Raiders/Damage Inc. 2 

Unity 2 

Wicks tf Sticks 

Rockies >^ 



Katie Kane (GL), Megan Kucik (J), Susan Olson 
(RL), Katie Parker (J), Julie Davis (GL), Cary , 
Haskell (MC), Linda Cox (RL), Jcancttc Voss 
(MC), Karen Bartman (MC), Joanne Dcsiniotes 
(G), Stacy Vavrik (GL), Amy Omclas (G), Beth 
Ccjka (^;C), Julie PoUgethcr (RL), Cortncy Foszcz 
(0), Katby Holtman (MC). 

Honorable mention 

Jriiny Necse (MC), Joanna Rultlc (RL), Erin 
Kl'jin (G), Dawn Stewart (J), Dawn Kyle (GL), Lor- 
c'lc Hurckcs (J), Trccia Fuilcrton (G), Jamie Stahl 
(W), Becki Zioiek (GL), Denisc Scmrow (MC), 
Vikki Hertel (GL), Amy Goodman (RL), Valerie 
Welton (W), Sarah Alaimo (RL). 
Boys track 

Daniel Ritchie (W), Derek Johnson (W), Jason 
Starzec (GL), Paul Foppe (MC), Rusty Nofsinger 
(RL), Zach Janssen (W), Chris Hanson (J), James 
Strand (RL), Nathan Laurcll (G), Mike Browne 
(MC), Tom O'ConncIl (MC), Jason Famer (RL), 
Ben Rockwell (GL), B-Jay Sallas (GL), Jeremy 
Barrett (J), Dave Jakslas (G), Dana Loizzo (MC), 
Robert Swanson (RL). 

Honorable mention 

John Burgess (G), Ryan Gough (J), Eric Peter- 
son (J), Mike Keller (MC), Ryan Benson (G), 
Brent Bywatcr (GL), Jami Fodor (W), Ed Jucr- 



gcnscn (J), Brian Kattner (MC), Justin Zdcb (PvL), 
Chad I-affcrty (RL), Steve Swanson (GL), Andy 
Zoellick(MC), Tim Randall (W), David Hay (RL), 
Dan Colin (G), Joel Zamstorff (MC), Mike Spy- 
ch!ila(GL). 

Girls track 
Angela Spaulding (RL), Becky Eiden (GL), 
Jaime Weber (W), Jessica Corcoran (GL), Karen 
Minkalis (RL), Maxine Othava (MC), Megan 
Buchanan (J), Jennifer Wellons (RL), Toni Wclzcn 
(RL), Cynthi Parker (MC), Heather Wojtarowicz 
(RL), Stacy Pcma (RL), Jenny Klos (MC), Melissa 
'Ruckcr (J), Leigh Hauick (MC), Jamie Hartman 
(GL), Uura Witek (MC), Malgozat Majcwskl (W). 

Honorable mention 

Kristinc Hoehne (O), Jennifer Noffsinger (W), 
Jennifer Marcomb (G), Sarah Kolanowski (MC), 
Valeric Hagi (G), Krislen Wisniewski (W). Kathy 
Clar (W), Melissa Frederick (RL), Jennifer ZibeJI 
(RL), Megan Reilly (RL), Tricta Lejman (G), Clau- 
dia Swanson (RL), Adrian Kraus (J), Tracy Remel- 
ski (W), Casey Bass (RL), Shcri Christie (G), Julie 
Duchanc (GL), Sarah Jurewicz (MC), Kim Rainer 
(RL), Karen Rainer (RL), Trina Cordova (RL). 
Chris Malo (J), Erin Powers (RL), Sue Huinkcr 
(MC), Debbie Clauser (J). 



Boys tennis 

Andy Lyman (J), Chris Dohm (J), Con O'Don- 
nell (GL), Dave Thomas (RL). David Tliirtlc (W), 
Eric Gardiner (GL), Jess Waldeck (J), John Wolfe ' 
(GL), TomThompson (J), Will Reimer (RL), Toby 
Merrill (G), Scott Zientara (RL). 

Honorable mention 

Bill Allen (W), Jim Hume (MC), Jeffrey 
Moloznik (MC), Paul Roeck (GL), Doug Schacfcr 
(J), Bill Gloff (G), Joe Russo (G), Ryan Btirkc (J), 
Stuart Primack (RL), Jason Evenson (J), Ryan Fin- 
ley (RL), Brandon Gough (J), Jed Doyle (GL), Mike 
Lanners (G), Eric Bauer (J), Scott Smith (MC), 
Adrian Cherikos (J), John Groden (MC), Dan Gon- 
zalez (RL), David Mcintosh (GL), Gordon Hill 
(RL), Hector Gonzalez (RL), Jody Burr (G), Phi! 
Bidro (J), AI Struck (J), Brett Christiansen (W), 
Chris Merkncr (W). 

Girls soccer 

Allison Waldenstrom (GL), Gina Miskanis 
(GL), Dcnise Eisner (W). Christine Kuriian (W), 
Tiffany Dyson (W), Rebecca Stcvig (W). Kan-ic 
Stctina (W), Amy Fon (GL), Kaihryn Kotowskc 
(GL), Stephanie Smith (GL), Georgette Demos 
(GL), Lori Olson (GL), Shcri Kwiakowski (GL), 
Dominique Lutz (W), Jennifer Freund (W), Kora 
Muligano (W), Dcliah Hernandez (W). 



Monday Night 
Men's Competitive 



Yachl-ScaVOullaws 
Downing Tavern 
Profusion Systems 
Tribe ; 

Emil's/Rosendahl 
Costello's 

Jack Frost Iron Works 
Milwaukee Road House 
Tonyan Trucking 

Men's D 

In-Ljws , 

Strange Drew 
G MAC Mortgage 
Y-Nol/Knighlon 
• Hello Folks 
Hook's Lumber 
Y-Nol/Mifowski 
Rockies 
Whitney Street 

Men's D 

A&A Office Supply 

Robtn:»n's 
, Cherry Electric 
. Waukegan Safe <fe Lock 
' Sterling Finish 

Neilson's Enterprises 

Kclvcr's Tap 

Hometown Video 

intcrsccliun Development 

Sponin' Wood 

Women's 

Ncilson's Enicrpriscs 
Larson's Excavating 
Ultimate Distributing 
Yvonne's Other Place 
Ring's Radiator 
Beautiful Bodies Auto Body 
Kross-lnn 
S&G Iron Works 
Lestcri' Materials 
Angels 

Men's Church 

Patth Lutheran 
CalvaryTcmpIc 
Living Waters 
Shepherd of ilic Lakes 
Lakeland Evangelical 
Fox Lake Baptist 
Holy Cross Lutheran 
Delhel Lutheran 
St. Andrews 



W 

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3 
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Everybody has 
sales; our blue light 

is always on. 
Leather Stylo shoes 



Softball City 



Tuesday Night 
Men's Industrial 
W 

Dueblin Co. S 

Crisara &. Son 4 

Sons of Thunder ■ 3 

Midwest Brick Paving 2 

Y-Nol Sandbar 2 

Piper Plastics 1 

Cubs/Bakes Pub t 

Baxter Heltraiscn I 

JanJii Industries 1 



Wednesday Night 



Women's 



Men's Competitive 



KristoPs 
Quiet Storm 
Moore Creative 
Slugs 

Midnight Blue 
Da Boyz 

SegenJahl Printing 
Remax 
IBEW Local 150 

Men's D 

Tigers/Lakes Bowl 

Barbie Dowels 

Sufgipaih 

G&R Realty 

Sportsman's of Libcnyville 

Softball Fury 

Randell's 

Roadkill 

Ron & Brian's Suzuki 

Men's D 

Bulldogs 

Gan)-Mcd Packaging 
Crisara & Son 
Hastings S.B. Club 
Pcico/Ccnlury2l 
Grant He^l Sink 
Spartans 
Downing Tavern 
Rockies 
Mimi's Lingerie 

Men's D 

W L 

Pro-Tool 5 

Chili Whippers 4 

Kristors/Out of Control 2 2 

Bamum's A-Amcr. Holdogs 2 2 

Dynamite DJ/Knuckleheads 2 2 

C/C Pub 2 2 

Lite Sticks/Floor to CPI I 3 

Ceiling I 3 

Village Spirit Pub 1 3 

Jardis Industries 3 



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2 

2 

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Competitive 
w L 



Mundclcin Animal Hospital 

Shanty 

Precision 

WalkJnglon Collies 

Dizzy's 

Melln Chiro/lwema Sl.Farm 

R-J-B/S-B-G 

Kristors 

Maki Construction • 

Scott's Hcadquancts Salon 

Men's D 



Steiiz's Resort 
Gilmer Road House 
New Blood 
Bill's Pizza 
Intrupa 
Balls Out 
Shogrcn Fence 
Ultimate Distributing 
Strange Brew 

Men's 



D 



Kmart Nllcs 
BJS Builders 
Silver Clout 
16-lnchcrs 
Kf{M PlasUcs 
Diehards 
AAMCO 
One- Hi Iters 
McKay Mazda 

Men's 



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D 



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Rinnella Softball 6 

Peterson Plumbing 4 

KHM Plastics 5 

Jones Inicreable 3 

Naked Guns . 3 

Coffecmasten 3 

Fossum Decorating 2 

Merit Installations 2 

Slanulus Concrete I 

Contempo Design 

Men's C Major 
W 

Y'Not Sandbar 5 

Dunamis 2 

Downing Tavern 2 

Ken Cook Trucking 3 

Worms 2 

Dizzy's 2 

Ball Brothers I 

Outlaws 1 

Russell's Sports Club 1 



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Thursday Night 
Men's Industrial 
W 

The Flukes 4 

CF Industries 3 
Hello Folks Manufacturing 3 

Y-Not Sandbar 2 

DueblinCb. 2 

Men With Wood 2 

Quill Bandits 

Midwest Motor Cbach ' 

Wolohan Lumber 

Men's Competitive 



L 


1 
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1 

2 
3 
3 
4 

D 
L 

1 
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1 

2 
2 
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3 
3 



Men's D 

No Bull 

Men With Wood 

Modem Homes 

USFP 

Nix's 

Y-Not Sandbar/Glcncwicz 

Hammerhead s/Ullberg 

Midwest Motor Coach 

Stooges 

Walgrcen's 



W L 

4 



4 
3 
2 
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1 
1 
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4 



W 

Robinson's 3 

Ernie's Wrecking 2 

Scgerdahl ftinting 2 
Pegasus Messenger Service 2 

Lake County Elite ' 2 

Legends 2 

M argot's Rebels I 

Gone Fishin' 1 

Hcndrixson Installation 1 

Men's D 

Y-Noi Gnibich 

Mickey Finn's 3 

Dizzy's 2 1 

Tiger/Lakes Bowl 2 1 

M&M Excavating 2 2 

X-Dogs 1 2 

Downing Tavern 1 3 

Oogla>Boogla t 3 

Slowboys 4 
Men's D 

Fall Guys 

Slammers 5 1 

Midwest Hose 3 I 

JTsRoadhousc 3 1 

Computers Alive 2 2 

Highland Green Nursery 2 3 

McLean Fogg 2 4 

Colonial Tire I 4 

Diehards 1 4 

Midnight Blue 5 



Friday Night 

Coed 

w 

Waste Tech Pythons 4 

VR&N 4 

B&HMold 3 

Just Oak 3 

Lindenhurst Sluggers 2 

OMC Dream Team 2 

Bass Brawlers 1 

Quill Corp. I 

HubbcU Electrical Products 

Gumce Mills 

Coed Major 



W L 
6 





W 


L 


Simmons Engineering 







Ultimate 




I 


The Coeds 




I 


Custom Autc/Kcith's Topsoil 




1 


TC Squirrclls 




2 


A-Tirc 




3 


Longshots 


1 


3 


Herb's 24-Hour Towing 


1 


4 


Classic Chevrolet 





5 



Men's C 



N. III. Mechanical 
Aniioch Dodge 
Rock-N-Ro!l 
Nobcrt Plating 
Swirling Eddies 



W L 
4 



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Hello R)lks 

Men's D 

Dakotas 

Untouchables 

Seal CO at 

Blackjacks 

Landscape Concepts 

Great Lakes Metal Fab. 

B-C Concrete/Sup. Fabricatrs 

Quiet Smrm 

Crystal Transport 

Baxter 

Men's D 

Nobcn H 

Alpha Concepts 

Lake County Medical Gas 

D-K Contractors 

Bad Boys 

Blasters 

Bingham Sluggers 

Backsiabbers 

Federated 

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NEWS 1220 




THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 



Ojr 



Friday, June 4. 1993 



Lakeland Nowspcpers 49 

:.iJi.l'.'<LAAti^'U'^"'>'I?-' 0* 



?r^5^^^^^ 



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P Jk^ '« l-W-^i- « - 



Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 



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Meyers picked by peers 
for Class AA AD honor 



Johnsburg's Jim Meyers has been des- 
ignated Class AA Athletic Director of the 
Year by the Illinois Athletic Directors As- 
sociation (lADA). 

John Heidler, president of the Johns- 
burg school board, said Meyers was a 
great choice. 

"He celebrates with the successes of 
the athletes and gives them his support in 
their defeats," Heidler said. "Winning is 
not the main purpose of his program — it 
is learning and playing the game well and 
being a good sport and citizen. To me, 
this is the essence of what the student 
should take from the high school educa- 
tion experience." 

Dr. Rob Gough, Johnsburg superin- 
tendent, echoed Heidler's sentiments 
about Meyer.s. 

"Beyond his excellent work in leading 
and organizing, it is Jim's personal caring 
and people skills that make him the ex- 
ceptionjd leader that he is," Gough said. 




Jim Meyers 



"In this last year, I can recall many issues 
that would have become major problems 

— but remained instead minor dilemmas 

— due to Jim's personal involvement, 
tact, counseling abilities and genuine 
caring." 

Meyers has assumed a wide variety of 
tasks-and responsibilities in his position at 
Johnsburg. In addition to the normal 
overload of administrative duties, he's 
also responsible for the bidding and 
supervision of athletic, physical 
education, health, intramural, laundry and 
nurse supplies, Meyers is in charge of the 
district's laundry for athletics, custodial 
and kitchen services, and he coordinates 
use of all outdoor facilities with 
community groups. 

Meyers earned his bachelor's and mas- 
ter's degrees at Western Illinois and 
Northern Illinois, respectively. After a 
stint at Irving Crown High School, Mey- 
ers began at Johnsburg in 1977. 

Meyers was a formidable Softball 
player, playing on the 1980 USSSA Na- 
tional Championship team in addition to 
being named a member of the AU-Ameri- 
can team four times at three different 
positions within that organization. He was 
the McHenry County Class A Baseball 
Coach of the Year in 1982 and the 
Northwest Herald Class AA Softball 
Coach of the Year in 1 992. 

Meyers has been active in fundraising 
for such things as expansion of facilities 
and lights as well as weight room devel- 
opment and equipment. He has served for 
. a number of years on the Northern Illinois 
Officials Conrunittee Organization, which 
has< established a standard pay scale for 
officials. 



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Meyer to address Chamber 



The business of college^sports will 
be discussed by Ray Meyer, special 
assistant to the president of DePaul 
University and retired DePaul basket- 
ball coach, when he addresses the next 
luncheon meeting of the Greater Lin- 
colnshire Chamber of Commerce. 

The meeting will begin with an 
1 1 :30 a.m. reception followed by a 
noon lunch on Tuesday, J'lne 8 at 
Marriott's Lincolnshire Resort, 10 
Marriott Dr., Lincolnshire. The public 
is invited to attend with the cost of 
lunch $18. Reservations may be made 
by calling Shirley Friedlander at the 
chamber at 295-3111. 

Known throughout the United 
States as "Coach," Meyer is one of 
only five coaches who has won more 
than 700 basketball games as a Divi- 
sion I coach. His basketball team won 
one national title and twice more went 
to the final four. His teams have made 
20 postseason tournament trips, post- 
ing 37 winning seasons in 42 years. 

Meyer is a member of the Nai- 
smith Basketball Hall of Fame, four 
times National Coach of the Year and 



a past winner of the prestigious Lin- 
coln Academy of Illinois Award. He 
has written two books and is a color 
commentator on radio for DePaul 
University baskeibail. 

He graduated from the University 
of Notre Dame with a degree in soci- 
ology where he was captain for two 
years of the basketball team. 




Ray Meyer 



Warm-up for bocce meet set 



As a prelude to the U.S. Champi- 
onships June 12-19 at Alpine Country 
Club in Round Lake, Molinari Sambuca 
Extra and the United States Bocce Federa- 
tion will host a bocce exhibition June 7 at 
Chicago's Daley Plaza at noon. Bocce's 
finest players, including 1992 men's sin- 
gles champion Phil Ferrari, will- be on 
hand to demonstrate the game, provide in- 
struction, and answer questions. 

"The Daley Plaza Center is a great lo- 
cation for an exhibition and will allow us 
to introduce the exciting sport of bocce to 



a large lunch time crowd," said FerrarL 

Bocce, commonly compared to the 
English game of lawn bowling, is thought 
to be descended from Greek ball-tossing 

games. In Bocce, two teams of up to four 
people throw or roll large colored balls and 

compete to get them closest to a smaller 
ball known as a "pallino," Since the 19th 
century, when bocce first became ex- 
tremely popular in Italy, generations of 
Italians have passed down their love for 
what is becoming the sport of the '90s. 





f?^®»?j 










WE COVER YOllR TOWN 

At Lakeland Newspapers, we take the time to get the whole 
local news story. We print accurate and entertaining local 
news. Now is the time to take advantage of home delivery. 
Receive 52 weekly issues for only $16.50 

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Q Undenhurat NewB 

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I Mail with your check to: Circulation Dept. 

I Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, IL 60030 






5pApK^P(Kl eipWR<7RO" 



.Friday, June 4, 1993 



■ ri>;t«iri' 





WE'RE A mmE LOT 
THM JUST A COMVENIElVr STOMX 

The Country Grocer offers so much more than just your 

average corner store! We're expanding and remodeling to 

bring you* our valued customers, a brand new, full 

service deli. Our new deli will feature fresh imported 

s and cheeses! Along with FAST & FRESH lunch 

items. Look for our new deli coming soon! 







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Grocer is always Quick 

& Convenient 



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DRAWINGS! 

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Drawings held weekly for 

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Comer of Rockland Rd. & Milwaukee Ave. 



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As requested by several P.T,A. 

members of local surrounding 
schools, we do not carry any adult 

magazines for protection and a 
better environment for your children! 



PLAY HERE 










Libertyville 



^^s^n Your Local Country Grocer 

(708) 362-5226 

HOURS: 

Mon.-Sat. 6 a.m.-10 p.m. 
Sun. 7 a.m.-lO p.m. 



■*i- 



Friday, Jun© 4, 1993 



Lakeland Newtpapert 51 



Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 



.^ 1 



«■ 



.y 



llA'Ur' 



m 



Mock wins sprint feature; Moulis breaks lap record 



Kenosha's Kim Mock 
scored Ins second 25-lap 
sprint car feature win of the 
season on a record-setting 
night to highlight Gator's 
Dug Out of Trevor Night on 
Saturday, May 29 at Toft 
Auto Racing's Wilmot 
Speedway. 

Sprint car defending 
champion and pointleader 
Dave Moulis of Johnsburg 
Started the night off with an 
all-time one-lap track quali- 
fying mark of : 13.68 sec- 
onds (average speed of 
87.72 mph). 

For additional informa- 
tion on Wilmot events, con- 
tact the track office at 395- 
0500. 

Saturday, May 29 
Gator's Dug Out Night 

Sprints 
25-lap Feature 

1. Kim Mock, Kenosha; 2., 
Frank Filsko, Des Plaines; 3. Joe 
Roe, Kenosha; 4. Dave Moulis, 
Johnsburg: 5. Dale Peterson, 
Brookflcld; 6. Darrell Ckxid, Beach 
Park; 7. John Tiemey, Lake Villa; 
8. At Schmidl, Racine; 9. Jim 
Moulis, Fox Lake; 10. Gib Wiser, 
Neosho, Wis. 
15-lap Last Chance Qualifier 

Mike Frost, Zion; Filsko; 
Allen Winker, Kenosha; Tom 
Musgrave, Kenosha. 

10-lap Heats 

First heat: J. Moulis; Roe; 
Dick Colbum, Muskcgo, Wis.; 
Todd Daun, Kenosha. 

Second heat; Mock; Joe Kris* 
Ian, Beach Park; Tiemey; Larry 
Hilicrud, Arlington Heights. 

Third heat: Paul Andersen, 
Racine; Peterson; Wiser; Gary Zo- 
bel, Brillion, Wis. 

Qualifications: Moulis (: 13.68 
NTR 87.72 MPH.avg.. old-: 1 3.79 
by Moulis on 10/3/92); Frost 
(:I3,93); Mock (:13.98); Daun 
014.16). 

Modifieds 
20-Iap Feature 

1 . Lenny Ostrowski Jr., North 
Cape; 2. Lcroy Ostrowski, Mil- 



Better 

Bears 

bounced 

Lake Zurich's baseball 
team may have been ousted 
early in the Class AA re- 
gional, but the Bears do 
have some bright ^pots to 
remember. 

"We improved as a team 
in all areas from last year. 
We were 60 points better in 
batting average, 50 points 
better in on-base percentage 
and our earned run average 
declined by one-half point," 
Bears coach John Ncssheim 
said. 

Brian Haigh led the 13-15 
Bears with a .338 batting 
average; Josh Schwede hit 
.328, Bryan Coumoyer .324 
and James Cuellar .312. All 
. are seniors. 

Brian Kreschmer was 2-5 
with a 2.38 ERA. Andy 
Goglin, the losing pitcher 
against Hersey, was 4-4 
with a 2.04 ERA. He was 
4-1 in the Fox Valley Con- 
ference. 

The Bears were eliminated 
by Hersey 8-2. Six runs in 
the third inning by the 
Huskies spelled the differ- 
ence. 

"We gave up five or six 
outs and had some key mis- 
takes that kept the inning 
going," Nessheim said. 



waukec; 3. Fred Zack, Glendalc, 
Wis.; 4. Troy Hcpfncr, Sussex, 
Wis.; 5. Gary Dye, Genesee, Wis. 
12-lap Lost Chance Qualiilcr 

Lorry Vandervcre, Beach 
Park; Kevin Fredcrikscn, Milwau- 
kee; Tom Larson, New Berlin, 
Wis.; Bill Dean, Zion. 
10-tap heats 

First heat: Zack; Jerry Dotes; 
Waukegan; Tim Ammon, 
Kenosha; Dye. 

Second heat; Craig Lager, 
Greenfield, Wis.; Leroy Ostrowski; 
Chris Mooney, Oak Creek, Wis.; 
Mike Dubs, Russell, Wis. 



Third heat: Allen Winker, 
Kenosha, Jimmy Utiech Jr., 
Kenosha; Troy Hcpfner; Lenny 
Ostrowski. 

Sportsman 
20-lap Feature 

1. Ed Dcvall, Waukegan; 2. 
John Poehlcr, Libertyvillc; 3. Larry 
^urleia, Round Lake; 4. Jim 
Surleta, Round Lake; 5. Brian Ul- 
rich, Racine. 

8-Iap heats 

First heat: L. Surleta; Ulrich; 
Jim Bennett, Round Lake; Bobby 
John Hcnsley, Round Lake. 

Second heat: Pochler; Dave 



Holden, Zion; J. Surleta; Kevin 
Seidler, Wisconsin Dctls. 
Mini-Modiflcds 
10-lap Feature 

I. Glen Vemezzc, Salem; 2. 
Roy Morrison, Antioch; 3. Tom 
Sexton, Crystal Lake; 4. Ken John- 
son, Paddock Lake, Wis.; 5. Lorric 
Bochat, Salem, Wis. 

6-lap heats 

First heat; Tommy Sexton, 
Antioch; R. Morrison; Jim Morri- 
son, Antioch; Jerry Heywood, 
Richmond. 

Second heat: Johnson; Phil 
Schultz, Silver Lake, Wis.; 



Vcmczzc; Hermie Schultz, Silver 
Lake. 

Point Leaders 
(Througli May 29) 
Sprints 
I. Dave Moulis 204, 2. Kim 
Mock 187, 3. Joe Roe 164, 4. John 
Tiemey 153, 5. Darrell Dodd 147. 
Sprint 
Milter Genuine Draft Dash 
I. Moulis 24, Mock 17, 3. 
Tiemey 16, Mike Frost 14, 4. Roc 
8. 

Modifieds 
I. Lenny Ostrowski Jr. 190, 2. 
Jim Surleta 166, 3. Jimmy Uttech 



Jr. 143, 4. Dennis Spitz 139, 5. 
Gary Dye 137. 

Sportsman 

I . (Tic) Scott Kuxhousc and 
Surlcla 166, 3. Ed Dcvall 164, 4. 
John Poehlcr 160. 

Old Style Mini-Sprints 

I. Scoit Sippet 76, 2. Romy 
Baus 67, 3, Craig Schucffner 58. 4. 
Glenn Isaacson 56, 5, Stcver Rei- 
dcl Jr. 53. 

Mini-ModiHeds 

I. Tommy Sexton 120, 2, Ken 
Johnson 114, 3. Glen Vcmczzc 
1 10, 4. Roy Morrison 102, 5. Jerry 
Heywood 100, 



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Round Lake 9 reflects on '93 accomplishments 




Round Lake's Clint Rodriguez beats a throw to second against Grant during 
regional play. — Photo by Bill Carey 

CHS takes battle of bases, 
collects regional final spot 



Carmers Curt Salata's injury time was 
officially over long about 1 p.m. Satur- 
day. 

For that was when the Carmel Corsairs 
wrapped up a 6-2 win over Warren which 
advanced them to the regional Hnal. 
Carmel notched its 23rd win of the season 
as Salata collected three singles. 

Salata and Matt Head, both of whom 
have Gumce connections, had seven of the 
nine Carmel hits as Brian Buckingham 
gained the win in relief. 

"We came out hyped up for the game and 
played together," Head said. 

Salata, grew up in Gumee and many of 
the Blue Devil (13-13) players he helped 
end their seasons were old firiends. 

Head's Gumee connection is that he toolc 
catching pointers from Mike Foote. Foote 
is a Warren and College of Lake County 
catcher who went on to play for the na- 
tional championship at Aurora Univer- 
sity, 

The game boiled down to the battle of 
the bases. Carmel had three stolen bases 
in a two-run fourth inning. Warren had a 
rough day. 

"We had three basemnning errors and 
that hurt us," Warren ' Coach Dar 
Townsend said. 

Adam McMahon scattered the Carmel 



Wildcats 



(Continued from Page 47) 

second base and moved to third on a 
Shawn Park safety. 

"The pitch was clearly a balk. The um- 
pire made the right call," Panther said. 

Libertyville, Waukegan regional 
champs, faces Elgin at Barrington at 1 
p.m. June 5. 

Libertyville's (24-8) winning pitcher was 
Adam Jacobsen, who came on in relief 
with a 2-0 count on Matt Head in the 
eighth inning with a runner on second 
base. 

"I much prefer to come in relief," Jacob- 
sen said. 

Panther had high praise for his pitchers, 
who rose to the occasion after losing ace 
Craig Nettles. 

Carmel looked like it would be the more 
aggressive team as it stole four bases 
while Liberytville missed on its only 
chance and got picked off in another play. 

Junior Janiie Camithers staked the Wild- 
cats to a 2-0 lead with a homer to left in 
the fourth. 

"It was just a fastball that was over the 
plate. It was a mistake, but Buckingham is 
a good pitcher, though," Carrulhers said. 

Carmel answered with a run in the 
fourth. Moments after that blast, Tony 
Longmire put one over the fence in left for 
a2-lLHSlead. 



hitting as the Corsairs scored one in the 
first two innings. 

"Adam did an outstanding job. He had 
good location," Townsend said of the se- 
nior. 

Carmel took a 2-0 lead after two. Head's 

RBI single scored Salata in the first. 

Warren had the first of its baserunning 
errors in the first. Mark Leginski doubled, 
but was tagged out between second and 
third on a ground ball. 

Warren gained a 2-2 tie in the second. 
Chris Kohn and Matt Pulaski delivered 
the RBI singles. 

Carmel's aggressiveness on the basepa- 
ths come home in the fourth. Singles by 
Head, Jeff Bunker and Buckingham were 
aided by steals by those three to a 4-2 
lead. 

Carmel scored single runs in the last two 
innings. 

As for the Blue Devils, Townsend will 
have plenty of memories. "This was my 
first season and I coached these guys when 
they were freshmen. It was a leaning ex- 
perience for me, too," he said. 

Warren, the fifth seed of the Waukegan 
regional, beat Zion-Benton 13-10 in a 
wind-blown tourney opener. Carmel had 
no trouble ousting North Chicago by a 

17-3 count. 



Carmel (24-10) tied it in the fifth in- 
ning. Curt Salata reached on an infield hit 
after Mike Rapplean singled. Rapplean 
was thrown out at home on a ground out 
but Salata scored when Longmire reached 
on an infield hit. 

That is where the score stayed for five 
innings as the two teams traded scoring 
opportunities. 

Carmel came within inches of a lead run 
in the seventh. Longmire had his third 
single for the game, and Pettis Kent 
reached on an infield hit bunt with Long- 
mire on third. But Longmire did not take 
advantage of the apparent squeze play, 
leaving the score 5-5. Erick Jensen then 
ended the inning with a flyball. 

Then the game went into extra innings, 
which Waukegan and Carmel found out is 
Wildcat Time. 

Baseball notebook: the Waukegan 
Booster Club members worked overtime at 
Bowen Park Saturday and Monday, and 
they were ready each time athletic director 
Dick Hyde announced "the concession 
stand is open with food at reasonable 
prices" . . . Carmel High graduate Scott 
Stahoviak was promoted the Class AA 
level but his season has been interupted by 
elbow surgery. He was at the Grayslake- 
Round Lake regular season finale. He is 
expected to be out five weeks. 



by STEVE PETERSON 
Lakeland Newspapers 

Round Lake knew it would have another 
chance to make waves in the Northwest 
Suburban Conference season. 

"We were a senior-dominated team with 
a lot of guys playing last year. We wanted 
to defend the conference title, win a re- 
gional game and win the regional title," 
Round Lake coach Jim Prorok summa- 
rized 

The Panthers accomplished all but the 
last goal. Round Lake was eliminated by 
Crystal Lake South 5-3 Tuesday in the ti- 
tle game of the Woodstock regional. 
Round Lake finished with a 16-8 record. 

"There was a lot of expectations of this 
team. Everybody was trying to knock us 
off every night," Prorok said. 

Scott Ellenwood, who had an RBI in 
the Tuesday loss and three hits in a 10-0 
win over (Zary-Grove; Mike Niemczyk; 
centerfieider-base stealing specialist Clint 
Rodriquez; and catcher Vinnie Lira, who 
hit .409, will all be missed. 

Then there is Justin Koski, who showed 



his talents on defense, catching and pitch- 
ing, who will be missed as well. Scott 
Muellemann was the losing pitcher 
against the Gators but his efforts helped 
pace the RL pitching staff. 

Juniors who contributed include Eric 
Martinek, Luther Belcher, Justin Flem- 
ming and Ryan Bauer. 

Bauer saved his best game for a clutch 
situation, against Cary in the semis. 

"That was his best outing of the year. If 
he works hard, he could be a very good 
ballplayer," Prorok said, 

Bauer fanned five and walked three in a 
seven-hitter. 

Rodriquez had two hits and three RBIs; 
Muellemann was 2 f o 4 with three RBIs 
and Ellenwood had three hits and two 
RBIs. 

Round Lake doubled up on Gtant 20-10 
in the regional opener Joe Mauer and the 
Cryslake Lake South Gators proved to be 
the Panthers' conquerors. 

Maurer woo for the 10th time as the 
Gators advanced to play at the Barrington 
sectional Saturday, June 5. 




North Chicago's Shannon Logan goes high for the throw to no avail as Carmel's 
Curt Salata safely steals second during a regional contest. The Warhawks' Mark 
Mutuc backs up the play. — Photo by Gene Gabry 

Carruthers hits, pitches 
*Cats in long, strange win 



The Libertyville baseball team's offense 
may have been running on three of four 
cylinders of late, but all that changed 
Saturday. 

"We had not had too much of that," 
Coach Jim Panther said of the big hit. 
"We would get a couple of runners on base 
but not be able to score a run." 

Libertyville had to squeak past Grayslake 
3-1 in the first Waukegan regional game. 

Clutch hitting, mainly in the person of 
starting pitcher Jamie Carruthers relumed 
as Libertyville edged Waukean 4-3 in a 
bizarre 14-inning game in the regional 
semifinals. 

"I thought Jamie did an excellent job of 
pitching. We should have won in seven 
innings, but the kids did not quit. I told 
them I was proud of them," Panther said. 

"This is the longest game I've ever 
played in. I just saw it and hit it," Car- 
ruthers said. 

Carruthers' two-RBI single in the fourth 
gave the Wildcats a 3-0 lead. That held 
until the seventh inning. 



Trailing 3-0, Jason Workman and Derek 
Mitchell collected singles. After an out, a 
single and a triple produced two runs. 

Kelly Ryan then was involved in the 
controversial play. He was called safe on 
an infield hit despite a tag by first 
baseman Andrew Robertson. The end 
result allowed Brett Bowles to score the 
tieing run. 

Libertyville, led by winner Adam 
Jacobsen, turned out to have the better 
bullpen this chilly day at Bowen Park. 

"I knew I had to come in and shut them 
down," Jacobsen said. 

Neither team could capitalize on 
baserunners in the next six innings as 
prefect strangers in the stands became 
friends. 

Then came the Libertyville 14lh inning. 

Jacobsen walked and was sacrificed to 
second. After Robert Poulsen struckoui, 
Carruthers delivered the game-winning hit. 

Next up, first seed Carmel, a rival which 
with the Wildcats had a score to settle. 



.1 1 



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Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 






10: I*: 




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_l.;^7Jfc^ f^ » 3^^ ^*ll M n p rt *^^''' 



Mundelein's Lindsay Prezell (7) is congratulated after liitting a homer. Prezell 
was also the winning pitcher In the 10-0 regional victory over Stevenson. — 
Photo by Steve Peterson 

Stellar Skyhawk year ends 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

So many chances, so many memories. 

In an emotional nulshcll, that is wliai 
the Johnsburg girls soflball team was ex- 
periencing Wednesday morning. The Sky- 
hawks were upscL by Woodstock 4-3 in ihc 
liilc game of the Johnsburg regional. Yet, 
there was the 19 victories and second 
straight conference title which will became 
clearer once the hurt was over. 

"No excuses. We just did not get it 
done," Johnsburg Coach Jim Meyers said. 

Lori Herckes, a senior, closed out her 
JHS career by batting .562, with 32 runs 
scored and 22 RBIs. 

Karen Stilling, a junior inficlder, hit 
.407 with 33 runs scored and 17 RBIs. 

Then there was Amanda DcVoy, who hit 
.349 and led the team with 27 RBIs. 

The Skyhawks hit .326 as a team, com- 
pared to .204 for llic opposition. 

But the team lost its season to a Cin- 
derella type squad in Woodstock. The 17- 
10 Blue Streaks kept the tradition going of 
no number one team making it to the Bar- 



rington sectional. Woodstock, fourth-place 
team in the Fox Valley Conference, upset 
Round Lake 9-8 in the semis. 

The Skyhawks were limited to five hits 
by Woodstock's Michelle Groh. Two of 
Johnsburg's RBIs came on a walk and a 
ground out. 

The Skyhawks had clubbed Crystal Lake 
Central 13-3 after eliminating Aniioch 5- 
2. 

In the Central game, Herckes was iwo- 
for-four; Michelle Carmcl iwo-for-lhrec 
and Stilling had two RBIs. 

Stilling, Lynctte Regner, Maureen 
Bicreic and Cari Turner all had two hits 
hiLs against Central. 

Sophomore pitching ace Katie Parker, 
who suffered her first loss against Wood- 
slock, had 12 strike outs and two walks 
against the Tigers. "She was on a phcnom- 
inal run. She gave up only two walks in 
the last seven games," Meyers said. 

The NWSC's most valuable player will 
return next year, ready to keep the JHS 
league domination going. 



Pats 



(Cont. from Page 47) 

tack. 

Coach Bob Mackey at- 
tributed doing the little 
things to gaining a spot in 
the Niles West sectional 
June 5. Stevenson, which 
tied for second in the North 
Suburban Conference, is 
27-5. 

"I think it is a great team. 
I think we really deserve to 
win a championship. We 
were one game short in the 
league so hopefully we can 
go on and get some more," 
Mackey said. 

"He's got a great arm and 
awesome movement on the 
ball. He's coming on. He 
was good at the beginning 
of the year and he's been 
coming on since," Mackey 
said. 

"He had a little bit of 
trouble getting ahead of the 
hitters in the first couple of 
innings, but he settled 
down. He threw fastballs to 
get ahead in the count. The 
last couple of innings he 
threw a lot of fastballs and 
they could not hit them," 
Allen said. 

Fredrick, a junior, is the 
club's leading home run hit- 
ter and clubbed another one 
this Memorial Day in Lin- 
colnshire. 
"I just look for a fastball 



in my zone," Fredrick said. 

The three-run homer in the 
fourth was part of a five-hit, 
eight run eruption for an 
11-0 lead. Nate McCabe, 
not to be outdone, cracked 
another three- run homer a 
few minutes later. 

On the mound, Fredrick 
offers a totally different 
look than Stevenson's other 
quality pitcher, Jeff Turn- 
bull. Tumbul! improved to 
11-1 with a 5-0 win over 
Highland Park in the re- 
gional opener. 

"I don't think I called a 
changeup today. Turnbull 
throws a lot more change- 
ups, against Highland Park, 
especially. Kevin is more of 
an overpowering pitcher," 
Allen said. 

"He holds the ball with 
four seams so when he 
comes down with it, his 
fastball comes about five or 
six inches to the inside to a 
right-handed hitter, outside 
to a left-handed hitter. It 
makes it tough to hit, even 
if his velocity is not there. 
The last couple innings, he 
was throwing gas out 
there," Allen said. 

Allen was one of the mi- 
nority of the Stevenson 
players not to have played 
in the Buffalo Grove sys- 
tem. He learned his task 



from Art Mansavage's Lake 
County Chiefs. 

He holds the same belief 
as the rest of the Patriots as 
they head into a 12:30 p.m. 
game June 5 at Niles West. 

"We have a lot of confi- 
dence going into the sec- 
tional. The shutout gives us 
a great feeling. We really 
care about each other a lot," 
Allen said. 



Strong starts not enough 
for RL in Softball tourney 



Round Lake's softbatl team started two 
regional games the same way. Unfortu- 
nately, the end result was not the same. 

The Panthers scored 20 runs in the first 
inning against Grant and Woodstock. The 
Panthers cruised to a 24-3 win over the 
Bulldogs but after the 7-0 lead against 
Woodstock, matters fell apart in a 9-8 
loss. 

The game Saturday was Howard 
Schroeder's last as a coach at RL — a po- 
sition he has had for 30 years. 

"It was bittersweet. I have been in high 
school coaching for 30 years and I will 
definitely miss it," Schroeder said. 

The Panthers finished with a 15-7 over- 
all record and were second in the North- 
west Suburban Conference, three games 
behind winner Johnsburg. 

"Losing six starters from last year's 
team, I would have been happy to finish 
.500," Schroeder said. 

Against Woodstock, the Panthers scored 
all eight runs in the first two innings. 



The Blue Streaks answered with three in 
the second, three in the third and three in 
the fifth and added another in the sbcth. 

"No phase of our game was good," 
Schroeder said. 

The best news for the new RL softball 
coach next year is five of the six all-con- 
ference selections return. 

Shortstop Grace Alaimo, a freshman, is 
back, coming off a .500 batting average 
in conference play; her sister Sarah, a ju- 
nior outfielder-infielder, hit ,333 and 
Monica Miszewski, a senior catcher, hit 
.447 in conference. 

Shannon Zink, who had both decisions 
in the playoffs, was 14-4, 1 1-2 in the 
conference. "If she works hard over the 
summer, she could be a major force in the 
conference," Schroeder said. 

As for the game in general, Schroeder re- 
flected after his tenure as head coach. 

"Especially this year, you have the haves 
and the have-nots," he said. 



Huge inning lifts Wildcats 
past Warren in regional tilt 



Timing, as they say, is everything and 
Warren's softball team discovered a re- 
gional game is not a good time to surren- 
der a nine-run inning. 

Liberty ville scored nine of its 17 runs 
in the second inning and coasted to a 17-4 
win, ousting Warren from the Mundelein 
regional tourney. 

"Jill (Chumbley) had a difficult day on 
the mound and they hit her pretty well," 
Warren coach Joyce Norton said. LHS had 
14 hits on the day and took advantage of 
six Warren errors. 

Norton found some bright spots in the 
season-ending loss. "I was happy with out 
baserunning and freshman Lisa Aaron 



came in and had two hits," Norton said. 

Lindsey Celba was 3 for 4, Trisha 
West 2 for 2 and Teresa Halverson 2 for 
4. The three combined for nine of the 
RBIs behind winning pitcher Kerry 
Gustafson. 

Warren, in Norton's first year, finished 
13-10. Senior Marlene Elfering was the 
leading hitter. 

"The game is a microcosm of life. You 
work as a team, find that competitive edge 
and sometimes you look to find a depth of 
character," Norton said. 

Libertyville was eliminated in 
semifinals by Lake Forest. 



the 



LZ softball gathers honors 



Throughout the season, timely hitting 
and strong pitching carried the Lake 
Zurich softball squad to 25 victories. 

But one day, the Bears met a team which 
had more of those two qualities and the 
Bears were eliminated from the Dundee- 
Crown regional 13-5 by Barringlon in the 
title game. 

All-conference honors were plentiful for 
the Bears, though. Six players were 
named from the undefeated conference 
champions. 

Senior Becky Krueger, juniors Amanda 
Leineberg, Debbie Poppe, Amy Ohrt, and 
sophomore Nicole Mickolay were hon- 
ored. 

"We got the hits, but not the big hits 



and that was the difference," Lake Zurich 
Coach Joe Kedizor said of the Barrington 
game. 

Barringlon outhit the Bears 1 1-8. 

"It is difficult now, but the players will 
later realized what they accomplished in a 
25-2 season," Kedizor said. 

Lake Zurich led 2-0 and 4-2 early, only 
to see Barrington rally. 

Konko, the winning pitcher in a 9-1 win 
over Cary-Grove, was the loser against 
Barrington, finishing 10-2. 

"The Cary-Grove win was satisfying be- 
cause we had to play them four times," 
Kedizor said. 

Four runs in the sixth inning decided the 
contest. 



PUBUC NOTICE 
VERNON TOWNSHIP 
Notice is herab/ given that sealed proposals will be 
received at the office of Vernon Township Highway 
Commissioner at 3050 N. Main Street, Prairie View, 
Illinois 60069 until 10 o'clock, A.M., on June 18, 1993, 
(or the construction of the following work: 

1. Bituminous Pavement Removal, 1 1/2" 

2. Pavement Patching 

3. Bituminous Materials (Prime Coat) 

4. Prime Aggregate 

5. Bit Cone. Surf. Cse., CI. I, Ty. 2. Mix. C 

6. Inlets to be adjusted 

7. Curb and Gutter Repair 
B. Sidewalk Repair 
Proposals shall be made on forms furnished by the 

Township Highway Commissioner, and shall be 
addressed in a sealed envelope to: 

Vernon Township Highway Commissioner 

3050 N. f^in Street 

Prairie View, Illinois 60069 
and shall be marked 'Roadway Improvements 1993, 
Letting of June 18, 1993.' 

Further information regarding the letting may be 
obtained by contacting the Highway Commissioner at 
634-4600. 

By Order of David M. Anderson 

Vernon Township Highway Commissioner 

0693A-726-Gen 
June 4, 1993 



SY 


10,200 


SY 


156 


Gal. 


2.947 


Ton 


29 


Ton 


2,941 


Ea. 


4 


Lin. Ft 


549 


Sq.Ft 


3,064 



PUBUC NOTICE 
AVON ROAD DISTRICT 
Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be 
received at the office of the Avon Township Clerk at 433 
E. Washington Street, Round Lake, Illinois 60073 until 
10:00 o'clock, A.M.. on June 17, 1993 for furnishing of 
the following material: 

BITUMINOUS CONCRETE SURFACE COURSE, 
MIX C, CLASS I. TYPE 2 

60 TONS 
BITUMINOUS BASE COURSE 

170 TONS 
Proposals shall be" made on forms furnished by the 
Highway Commissioner, and shall be addressed in a 
sealed envelope to Patrick Anderson, Avon Road District 
Highway Commissioner, 433 East Washington Street, 
Round Lake, Illinois 60073 and shall be marked 'material 
proposal - Letting of June 17, 1993, Avon Road District". 
Further Information regarding this letting may be 
obtained by contacting the Highway Commissioner at 
708-546-7480. The Road District in accordance with the 
laws of the State of Illinois hereby notifies all bidders that 
it will affirmatively insure that the contract entered into 
pursuant to this advertisement will be awarded to the 
lowest responsible bidder without discrimination on the 
ground of race, color or national origin. 

By order of Patrick Anderson 

Avon Road District 

Highway Commissioner 

0693A-72B-Gen 

June 4, 1993 



if- , ■'.■ 

I; _ _ ■ , 

''■','■■''•■ 

;'/■■-•■■■:' 



54 Lakoland Newspaper* 



Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



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Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 




AAA 



Dairy Queen 
Burger King 


W 

3 
2 
2 

2 
1 

1 
1 




L 


1 

1 

1 

2 

2 
2 
3 


Ahtioc 


First Chicago 

Hansen Custom Cabinets 
Antiocii Tire 

PIP Printing 
Raymond Chevrolet 
BJ's Sports 


May 25 
Burger King 24, BJ's 4 
Dairy Queen 11, Antioch Tire 5 
First Chicago 8, PIP Printing 7 . 
Hansen Cabinets 3, Raymond Chevy 2 

May 27 
Dairy Queen 6, First Chicago 5 




Raymond Chevy 10, BJ's 9 
Hansen Cabinets 9, Antioch Tire 7 
Burger King 4, PIP Printing 2 

Borger King 24, BJ's Sports 4 

Defensive: Curtis Hatfield caught a pop and 

doubled a runner off first 

Offensive; Justin Mchaffey had four hits and drove 

in three runs; Curt Kull had two hits and drove in 

two runs. 

Defensive: Dan Mikal and Matthew Elliott teamed 

up to make a great double play. 

Offensive: George Guien, home run. 

Dairy Queen 6, First Chicago Bank 5 
Defensive: Jerry Mihoviiovich. Dan Ridcnour, 
Ryan Catlanan, 

Offensive: Luke Larson, three RBIs; Ryan 
Callanan, three RBIs. 
Defensive: Jamie Link, Tommy Cichon. 
Offensive: Jamie Link, 



Hidad 
TheVauh 
Bemhardt's 
Lyons & Ryan 
First National 






3 
3 
3 
3 



Major 





W 


L 


BaskiH'Robbins 


4 





State Bank 


3 


1 


Senior Center 


3 


1 



Hadad 12, Lyon-Ryuns 10 

Defensive: David Allen, Daniel Pasiewicz, Quinn 

Gooch. 

Offensive: Derrick McKinzie; David Pasiewicz, 

single, walk, two stolen bases; David Allen, two 

hits; Kyle Fielder, triple. 

Offensive: Nathan Garden, two hits, double, 

single, four runs. 

Senior Center 11, The Vault 7 
Offensive: Justin Pawlowski, 2 for 3; Tim 
Bizankin, 2 for 3, double, triple. 

Senior Girls 

Flo's 8, State Bank 7 
Defensive; Danah Dcbore. 
Offensive: Katie Deferc. 
Defensive; Kaicn Lockhead, 
Offensive: Becky Barren. 



Avon Little League 



Pony Traveling Girls 

Angels 23, Waves 18 

Defensive: Kristin Locke, Brandi Dobrzcnski, 
Heather Livesay. 



Are we having fun yet? 

Missy Mathena displays grim determination during a Grant Township Little 
League game. — Photo lay BUI Carey 



Antioch offers basketball camps 



Antioch will offer basketball camps 
for boys June 16-18. 

The session for fourth and fifth-graders 
is set for 8:30-10:15 a.m. The fee is $25. 

Sixth and seventh-graders will attend 
from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on the 



three days, while eighth and ninth-graders 
will come in from 1 to 3 p.m. The cost is 
$30 for these two groups. 

Applications *have been distributed to 
all grade schools. For more information, 
call Jeff Dresser at 395-1421. 



Soccer teams finish annual tourney 

All three Lindcnhurst .The U-14 Blitz was from Detroit. The Blitz 
Soccer Club girls traveling eliminated early in the tour- ended up sixth in its divi- 
teams competed in the 10th nament by the Redstars sion. 
annual Park Ridge Tourna- 
ment over the Memorial 
Day weekend. 

The under- 1 2 Power and 
the U-10 Lightning earned 
medals for fourth-place fin- 
ishes in their divisions. 
Coaches Ron Giangiorgi 
and Mark Hungarland 
praised their team's play. It 
was the first tourney for the 
Lightning. 




The Champs 

Grayslake's tennis team shows off its Northwest Suburban Conference title 
trophy. First row: Todd Faurbo, Jon Wolfe and Con O'Connell; Second row: 
Coach Paul Keller, Dave Mcintosh, Jed Doyle, Paul Roeck and Erik Gardiner. 



I SAVE «2.« 1 



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■ Grayslaks $27 S45 ■ 
JGumofl S30 S40 j 
lundenhursl $33 . $48 I 
I Round Lake Aroa S£. $50 | 
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■ Package Delivery with this ad . 



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INSURANCE AGENCY /WC, 

SINCE 1929 




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1733 WASHINGTON ST. -WAUKEGAN 



DANI BONNGARD 

Multi Car Discounts 
•Preferred Driver Discounts 
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^a/ 



Estate 



By NANCY CLUTE 



REALTOR 



Banana Split 1'' 

Hot Dog 690 

Double Buigei ...... .^P^ 



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Zion.lL 872-4360 



4673 Grand Ave. 
Gurnee, IL 244-5283 



'Only Avaltablo at Zton 



Dairii 
Queen 



Offer Good Through June 6 



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8" Round 
or Larger DQ. 
Frozen Cake 

Please present coupon Mora order- 
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RedBemablo only on Hems selling at 
regular price, mis coupon not re- 
deemable with any other coupon oi- 
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on this ad. Void where prohibited, li- 
censed or regulated by Law,9 U.S. 
Pat Otf., D.Q. Corp. 



I 



LJ 



THE LEASE BUYOUT 

Here is the problem. You have decided to 
buy a two-family house jointly with a relative. 
The price is right, but only one half of the 
house will be available at the time of 
purchase-the seller's half. The tenant stilt 
has six months to go on his lease and plans 
to remain. You want to occupy both units at 
the time of purchase. Is there a solution? 

Since you do not desire to wait out the 
rental term, a solution to the problem could 
be a lease buy-out. The tenant under lease 
will obviously know that the lease will not be 
renewed, however, he might be agreeable to 
vacate if offered a cash inducement to do so. 
Lease buy-outs are very common in 
commercial real estate and might be 
applicable to this situation. 

By purchasing property with the assistance 
of an experienced residential agent, you gain 
considerable advantage in working with 
someone who can negotiate both with the 
seller and with existing tenants to suit your 
objective. 

If there is anything I can do to help you In 
the field of real estate, please phone or drop 
in at RE/MAX HERITAGE, 4641 Grand 
Avenue. Gurnee. Phone: 336-2600. I'm here 
to help! 



Friday, Juno 4, 1993 
KVf .l.'itii I .fl)l.| H 



Lakeland Newspapers 55 



\^,^.:^.^^^') 



Lakeland Newspapers' SPORTS 




andniles 



hurdles at jr. high state 



Grayslakc Middle School's Vanessa Ny- 
land came home with the gold as. she won 
the 110 meter low hurdles. in the state ju- 
nior high track and field meet. 

"We figured it out and 36 athletes started 
out in the event at 12 regional sites. She 




Vanessa Nyland returns to a heroine's 
welGonne. — Photo by Steve Peter- 
son 



won each of six preliminary hears and was 
the second seed going into the state meet," 
Graysiake Middle School athletic director 
Tim Borrics said. 

Nyland, who also competed on the 800 
meter relay team and in the long jump/re- 
ceived a break. 

"The girl in the fast lane fell when she 
hit the third hurdle," Borries said. "It may 
have been a close race if she had not 
fallen." 

Her time of 16.99 was far better than the 
second-place finisher. 

The middle school track team works out 
around the school grounds and at Grayslakc 
Community High School. Nyland has par- 
ticipated for six years at the Gymnastics 
Factory. 

"That really helps my flexibility .and 
stretching," Nyland said. 

The seventh grader is the daughter of 
Miles and Jill Nyland of Graysiake. Her 
younger brother Graeme, is on the track 
team. 

Nyland had a 14-6 in the long jump. 

Other Panthers set personal bests at the 
state meet in Washington, III. 

Jeff Hagen had a 2:19 in the 800 meter 
run and a 16-7 in the long jump. 

Shannon Snyder, Nichole Wright, 
Samantha Kruger, Nyland ran a 1:58 in the 
SOD meter run. Slehanie Eldridge is the al- 
icmatc. 

Nick Vlahos had a 34-7 in the shot put. 



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Grant greats 

Athletes tionored during Grant's spring awards night display their hard- 
earned hardware. Front row: Amy Ornelas, Scholar-Athlete Award; Chris 
Chlopek, girls track MVP; and Erin Klein, softball MVP and Athlete of the 
Year; Back row: Dave Lipinski, Scholar-Athlete; Jody Burr, tennis' MVP; Aron 
VonBruenchenhein, baseball's MVP; and Mike Ward, track MVP and Athlete 
of the Year. — Photo by Gene Gabry 



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♦ Home knfxovement Planning 

♦ Consulting 

♦ Interior Decorating 

♦ Architectural ' * 
Approval Available 



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42626 N, Sheridan Oaks • Antoch | 

HOME DESIGN (708)395-2247 




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Fresh Horlhemacle Salads 



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330 Shorev,'oud Dr. 
Round Lake Beach 

546-4950 




FOOT 
FACTS 

From The 
FOOT DOCTOR 




>r. Winters 



Dr. Griff J. Winters & Assoc. 

SpcccdlLzing in JicconaLnicliw Foot & Ankle Surgery 



PLANTAR WARTS 

Warts aro caused by a virus Infection and are otlon mlslakon as coffis and , 
calluses. Warls on Iha bottom ol (ho loot penQtrate deap undor Iho skin Ilka a 
mushroom, bocauso ol pressure In standing. Unlike corns and calluses, the 
center encapsulated area usually has rust-colored spots that are small blood 
vessels and nerves that supply the wart. For this reason virarts are mora painful 
Willi side to Bide pinching. 

Worts ere contagious to susceptible people and are usually found In 
adolescents. 

If the plantar wart Is small and discovered early, proscribed ctiomlcalagonts 
often llrnos aro all thai are needed. For large or roslstont warls, wo otlon time 
use iJisor surgery that gives good results with minimal discomlort. This Is done 
on an out-pallonl basis and tho patlonl loses no lime ott his feet. 

If you havo tho above symptoms or any other toot dbcomfort, you may contact 

Dr. Winters for a NO COST CONSULTATION to sob It ihare may ba en answer 

to your foot pain. 



770 Barron Blvd. (Rt. 03) 
Graytlaki 



223-4000 



10 Phillip Rd. 1121 
Vamon Hlllt 



We Leo ME 
WAqoN 

Helpful Civic infor- 
mation to acquaint 
you with your com- 
munity. Call the Wel- 
come Wagon repre- 
sentative so that she 
may visit you. 

Graysiake 



Lake Villa 

Viola Linda 

336-5971 223-1607 



Lindenhurst 

Sandy 
356-2012 

Gumee 

Patty 
223-6498 

Mundeiein 

Laurie 
566-1653 



Lincolnshire 

Letty 
945-3161 



Lake Zurich 

Jeanette 
438-9049 

Long Grove 

Kildeer 

HaiAfthorn 

Woods 

Kay 
540-8977 

Libertyville 

Sally 
680-1599 

You are entitled to 
a complimentary 
subscription from 
your hometown 
newspaper. To re- 
ceive your paper, 
contact your Wel- 
come Wagon repre- 
sentative or call 
Lakeland Newspa- 
pers at (708) 223- 
8161. 



i 






:i 



^ 



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■.-:i; 



56 Lakeland Newspaport 



Friday, Juno 4, 1993 




: \-r_;ijj j ' ,i^f>emw r sTj ?f'f^''T^-r^^ 



M 



jone's FmruRE home 



.S,:' 



1F'^..',-Zj.^i- 



^■iiimc 









tj^s 



This 3 bedroom quad-level 
home is on a beautiful corner 
lot. Located close to parks & 
nature area. Newer roof, 
fascia, and gutters. Cedar 
siding with brick front. Brick 



fireplace in family room, library 
with lots of shelves, 2 full baths, 
attached 2-1/2 car garage. 

Listed at 



H 79,900 

Call Mike Culat for exclusive 
showing today at 83S-IVIIKE 



iiftf^'-" 



Unrfer Construction...Spring Grove, It. 







Awesome 3 bedroom all brick ranch on a 
1 -acre lot. Located near horse riding 
stables. Master bedroom large enough to 
live in. Dynamic entrance foyer, atrium 
doors leading to courtyard from 3 sides. 
Pre-wired for sound & T.V. 2 fireplaces for 
those chilly evenings. First-floor laundry 
area. Full basement with 9 1/2 foot 
ceilings. 3 1/2 car garage. Call now and 
pick your finishing touches. 




■ggMfeJfaJIW 



Proposed Construction!!! 

— All brick 4 bedrm. cape cod w/full walk-out lower level. 

Master surte w/whirlpooi, dressing area, walk-in closet. 
Large gourmet kitchen, dining room, family room, all. 
brick firepL One acre tot Make *-^ — -^ f\£%ir\ 
the finishing touch yours!!! . r2o9j9UU 




Proposed Construction In Spring Grove.,. 

3 bedroom raised ranch, 2 full baths, Cathedral Ceilings, partially finished lower level, 
attached garage, all on a beautiful wooded hillside lot. *4>ltt €%i\i% 

Proposed at -T*^^ 9^%^^ 
Call Mike Culat at 83S-MIKB 



Helping People 

Buy and Sell 

The American 

Dream 



Antioch Semi-Custom 
Cape Cod 



_ CULAT 

Lifetime Resident of Lake County 
• 15-year Resident of Antioch 

Proposed Construction.., 





First flcwfmaaSSBcludessauna. Large country Kiichen, 
formal dininq room, living room with bnck fireplace, extra large 
Bly roolSfa full and aTialf baths. Deck overlooking nature trails 
& pond.MunicifSal sewer and water. 

Listed at M 84,900 

Call Mike Culat a t B3B-MIKB 

Set Your Sails! 



4 bedroom ranch with a great-room, eat-in kitchen, cedar siding. 
Municipal sewer & water. Call now and customize these plans to 
fit your needs. *.^. — ^m.^^^^ 

Proposed at *94,900 
Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 



Vacant lots... 

Spring Grove area. Buildable 1-2.5 acre tots. Hillside, Wooded, 
Highway frontage. 

Starting at ^39,900 
Cr»f/ Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 



Looking for a "WEIV" home??? 





Antiochm.. 



This fantastic 3 bdrm. 2 story is located at the mouth of a deep 
ffiSnel teading to Uke Marie. Extra-large wrap-around 
SkSe living room with wood-burning stove^Remodeled 
kit /dining area perfectforenlertaining.lHardwood floors 
throughout the main floor. Full walk-out basement. Plus..195 ft. 
on channel frontage. &«I ftA Q^^ 

All For Just M^^ 3^^^ 
Call Mike Culat today at 838'MIKE 




Cail Mike Culat and find out about new construction values from 
»99 900 on up. Custom Construction bring your plans or look ai 

""■^ $99,900 on up. 

Call Mike Culat at 838-UIKE 

New Listingni 



ComfoSeS ijedroom ranch with laigelivhg room, targe 
master bedroom, first floor laundry. Located near Cham-o-Lakes. 

^69,900 

Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 




3 bedroom ranch with targe living room, eat-in kitchen, aluminum 
siding, 2 1/2 car garage, targe lot. Needs some T.LC. 

Listed at ^69,900 

Call Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 



Mike Culat toaay ax ooo-iwifv g | w««» ■»■■» _^ 

Call For Free Marketing Advice About Your Home. 






Or>0*tUHItT 




MIS 




RE/MAX Call Mike Culat 

Advantage Realty^ At 838-MiKE! 

532 Lake Street, Antioch, IL (6453) 



Lakeland Newspapers 57 



Friday. June 4, 1993 









:^A 



'T^tf-V P J*. ■■ 



^ 





Letter to 
the Editor 

Explain audit 

Editor: 

In reference to the front 
page article in the Grayslake 
Times concerning the "Park 
defending grant," I stand by 
ray statement "Members of 
this board in 1990 budgeted 
$10,425 for the director's 
salary to the Capital Im- 
provement Fund which is 
grant and bond money and 
budgeted $8,044 for the 
Spt. of Parks salary." The 
last official audit of the park 
dist. books on page 41 also 
shows that they spent more 
than they budgeted for the 
two salaries in this fund. 

Employee John Wilson 
is not the one who should 
be responding to my letter 
to the residents of the park 
dist. The elected officials 
should be giving the tax- 
payers the answer to this 
statement and others made 
in the letter, such as, on 
page 50 what is the fund 
"Other" that cost the tax- 
payers $20,631. Explain the 
thousands of dollars spent 
for seminars, conferences, 
dues and subscriptions on 
pages 50 to 51 of the audit, 
explain to us why we were 
taxed almost 60 percent, 
more than needed in the 
Public Liability Fund (pg. 
■ 26) and thousands and dol- 
lars were used to pay 
salaries to the Director and 
Supt. of Parks from this 
fund, and tell the taxpayer, 
is it really legal for the 
same audit firm that does 
the yearly audit to prepare 
the monthly treasurer re- 
port? Explain to the taxpay- 
ers why it is necessary for 
an employee to have a sepa- 
rate fund for writing 
$25,550.19 in checks. 
Statement of cash receipt 
and disbursements. * 

The assessed valuation 
of Grayslake Park Dist. has 
« increased more than 100 
. percent since 1987, produc- 
ing 100 percent more in 
revenue and our tax rate is 
still higher than in 1987 
(pg.52). 

These elected officials 
are preparing to ask the tax- 
payers to build a multi-mil- 
lion dollar swim complex 
for them to manage while 
' the last yearly audit (pg. 25) 
shows a deficit balance in 
the recreation fund for 1991 
of $22,331 and $14,963 in 
1992. 



Mary Jane Lucas 
Grayslake 




BARK »N' TOWN 
KENNELS 



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Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



.''. . 



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Newspapers 




over— choking first aid 



Infants and toddlers 
will put anything in their 
mouths. Protect them by 
keeping small object out 
of reach. 

Chances are, if you 
look around your home, 
you'll find some of these 



items on the floor and on 
low shelves — accidents - 
waiting to happen. Put 
them out of reach of 
young children. Ask older 
brothers and sisters to 
store toys with small parts 
up high. 



A child can also choke 
on these objects: safety 
pins, nails, tacks, screws, 
coins, crayon piece, mar- 
bles, small parts of a toy, 
broken or deflated bal- 
loons. Jewelry, and small 
batteries. 

Round and hard foods 
are especially dangerous. 
These snacks can be 
deadly to child under 
four. Ask a doctor when 
your child is old enough 
to eat these foods: hot 
dogs, nuts, ralsbis, hard 
candies, raw carrots, 
grapes and popcorn. 



Tips on lead prevention 




. Protect your child 
from lead. 

• Wash your children's 
hands before they eat 

• Foods iiigh in iron 
and calcium — lean meat, 
eggs, raisins, greens, milk, 



cheese, fruit and pota- 
toes — help get lead out of 
the child's system. Limit 
foods high in fat and oil 
which keep lead in a 
child's system. 

• Clean up chipping 
and pealing paint Inside 
and outside your home. 
Homes build before 1978 
may have lead paint In 
them. 

• Clean up paint ctiips 
and lead dust in window 
sills and on the floor near 
windoviTs, doorways and 
woodwork. Use a damp 
mop or cloth and a phos- 
phate cleaning product. 



• Wash your child's 
toys often. Throw away 
lead painted toys. 

• Do not store food in 
open cans or pottery. 

• If you work with lead, 
shower and change 
clothes before coming 
home. Wash your clothes 
separately. 

• Run cold watar for a 
few minutes before using 
it for cooking and drink- 
ing. Do not use water from 
the hot vrater tap for 
cooking, drinking or 
making formula. 

For more information 
call 1(800)545-2200. 





PRE-SCHGOL 

A Memorable 

Childhood Experience 



Yaur child -will love our fun and 
innovative jpre-'school pro^ani. 
You'll love the peace of mind. 

FULLY SUPERVISED DAY CARE PROGRAMS 

• Boys & Girls Ages 2-6 

• Warm, Caring Environment 

• State Certified Teachers 

• Fully Supervised At All Times 

• Education & Recreational Emphasis 

• Hot Catered Lunches 



1730 Lewis Avenue, North Cliicago, XL 60064 
^ (708)689-8100 




Introducing 

Sylvan's® Early World Of Learning 

Help Your Pre-schooler (3-5 yrs.) make the Transition To The Classroom 



We extend listening 

and speaking 

vocabularies and 

provide positive 

learning experiences. 




Program Starts Juiie 14 and will 
rim for 8 weeks. 

r m^ Sylvan CaU Today! 

ST t®*"!^!''?^ VERNON HILLS 

5iP Center o|<7 1-9 1 7 

"HilpinsKtdsBt Their Best" €P\J i -O^A i 

Sylvan Learning Contcr or Vernon I HUs Wliorc Learning is FUN 



♦war?^ 



Choking Is the fouilh 
leading cause of acciden- 
tal death In young chil- 
dren, especially those un- 
der the age of three. 
Choking first aid 
(for conftcloui victims) 

If a child can cough, 
speak, or breathe, do not 
interfere. If a child is un- 
able to cough, speak, or 
breathe, follow tiiese 
steps. 

For an Infant: 

•Try 4 quick back 
blows. 

•Then give 4 thrusts. 
Place 2 fingers on the 
breast bone between the 
nipples. Push down and 
let go. 

•Repeat until airway is 
clear. 

For a child; 

•Stand behind the 
child with your fists 
clasped between the navel 



and bottom of the breast thrusts, in and upward, 
bone. •Repeat until airway is 

•Give 4 quick, strong | clear. 



For an infant: 




For a child: 




Benefits of intergenerational social activities 



1. Intellectual and 
emotional motivation. 

2. Change of environ- 
ment or routine. 

3. Opportunity to ex- 
press emotions. ^ 

4. Recognition and ac- 
ceptance from peers. 

5. Opportunity to exer- 
cise talents and skills. 

6. Opportunity to build 



self-confidence and secu- 
rity. - 

7. Outlet to contribute 
to someone else's happi- 
ness. 

8. Opportunity for 
spontaneous social inter- 
actions. 

9. Opportunity to learn 
and maintain acceptable 
social behavioi^. 




Martial Arts can 

help your child gain 

self-confidence, 

improve 
concentration 
and develop self 
discipline. 




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sidekicks offers convenient 
schedules six days a week as 
well as a wide variety of pro- 
grams tailored to meet your 
needs.- Our structured chil- 
dren's programs are all 
taught by qualified black 
belt instructors. Best of 
all, your child will not 
only learn martial arts, 
but have fun doing it as 
well. Call Today! 



CLASSES FOR 
MEN, WOMEN & CHILDREN 



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MARTIAL ARTS 



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I Call 356-1424 2108 E. Grand Ave., Lindenhurst I 
I I 



% 



Friday. June 4, 1993 



Lakeland Newspapers 59 



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Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Plenty of summer fun available right at home 



As those long awaited 
summer months Eire fast 
approaching, children 
and parents anxiously 
begin looking forward to a 
time of fun and relaxation. 
While many families plan 
vacation time away, others 



choose to vacation in and 
around their community. 

Every community has a 
park district that offers a 
variety of summer pro- 
grams that include special 
events as well as weekly 
classes in a variety of areas 



Know policies 
address health 



Children do catch 
colds and other commu- 
nicable diseases from 
each other. And their falls, 
brnnps and scrapes are 
inevitable consequences 
of their exploration and 
exuberance, even under 
the watchful eyes of dot- 
ing parents. Child care 
programs should estab- 
lish and communicate to 
parents policies and pro- 
cedures that address 
health and safety issues. 
These should include: 

•Any medical re- 
quirements for entrance. 

•Types of illness or 
medical conditions that 
will exclude a child from 
the facility, 

•Reporting of illness. 

•Handling Illness that 
develops while the child 
is being cared for. 



•Dispensing and safe 
keeping of medications. 

•Dealing with injury. 

•Maintaining medi- ' 
cal /health records in ac- 
cordance with standards 
of the American Academy 
of Pediatrics and Public 
Health. 

Staff members should 
have adequate training to 
minimize communicable 
diseases and to provide 
first aid. 

The staff should also 
be trained in proper food 
handling to prevent food- 
borne disease. Food 
should provide for chil- 
dren's nutritional needs, 
as well as being tasty and 
appealing. Food prepara- 
tion and service areas 
should be sanitary. Chil- 
dren and staff shoidd 



such as arts and crafts and 
sports. Many even have a 
swimming pool for public 
use. 

For those who wish to . 
plan weekend outings, the 
Botanic Gardens in Glen- 
view offers opportunities 

that 
issues 

wash their hands before 
handling food and after 
toileting. 

Children must be 
provided with an envi- 
ronment that is safe, offer- 
ing protection from haz- 
ards and potential injury. 
They must also be pro- 
tected from potentially se- 
rious Infectious diseases. 
Child care providers)' par- 
ents and health profes- 
sionals should be partners 
in the prevention and 
prompt treatment of ill- 
ness and injury. You can 
do your part by following 
your provider's policies, 
by calling any potential 
problems to her attention, 
and by discussing any se- 
rious concerns with your 
local health department 
of DCFS. 



Important information oh 
Quality Child Care! 




==^ 



If you are a parent seeking quality care, a "would be" provider 

considering offering quality child care, or a current provider looking 

to maximize the quality of your child care services, then the YWCA of 

Northeastern Illinois has important, comprehensive, educational 

and valuable information for you through its 

"Child Care Resource and Referral Service." 



v^ 



mm 

YWCA 

of Northeastern Illinois 

Located in the nrlfietere Center 
Wauke/jan, Illinois G0085 



InCormation For Parents; 

Training to provide quality 

child care. 

"Start-up' assistance. 

Referrals 
Parents Please Call: 

l.B0O-CinLD76 

Current and "Woiild-bc" 

providers PIcnsc Call: 

Lake County 
am G62-8670 

McHcnry County 
(« 15) 459-2644 



A Free Workshop On 

"How To Start A Family ' 

Child Care Home" Will lie 

Held On June 10 In 

Richmond. Call 

703-662-42113 or 

015-459-2644 

jr More Details. 



Fully Licensed and Professionally Staffed 

Year-Round Day Care Programs 
\vt/y/r— /y Children 5-1 2 Years 

or Northeasiern Illinois Monday - Fhday 6:30 am - 6:00 pm 



wm 



Before/After School Core • Teachers Workdays 
School Holidays • Winter/Spring Brakes 



Early Dismissal 



Summer Vacation 



Peace of Mind for Every Working Parent 
A Wonderful Experience for Every Child, 

For complete 
informatiorif call now! 



(708) 662-4247 



F0«9 Bra detetmlnod usinp o sliding lea 
and incomo. Fulty 



scale 



based on fomily sire and i 

subsidized slots are also available (or worlcinB 

(amillss who quality. 




for families to walk out- 
side among acres of flow- 
ers and trees. Lambs Farm 
in Llbertyville offers a pet- 
ting zoo, miniature golf, a 
pet store, and an old-fash- 
ioned ice cream parlor as 
well as areas to sit and 
picnic. Proceeds go to- 
wards the program that 
offers training and em- 
ployment to special needs 
adtllts. 

For something really 
different, the Renaissance 
Faire in Bristol, Wis., 
recreates a period of his- 
tory filled with kings, 
queens, knights, and 
dragons. Every aspect of 
the period Is recreated in- 
cluding games and music 
for children. 

There are many activi- 
ties that can be enjoyed at 
home as well. Planting a 
garden together with your 
child provides endless 
opportunities for dis- 




cussing the growth cycle of 
living things as well as ' 
teaclilng children re- 
sponsibility for a job. And 
all those messy art projects 
such as playdoh and 
painting can now be done 
outside with little concern 
for cleaning up. Of course 
there are always days 



spent at parks nmnlng, 
playing and picnicking. 

No matter what the ac- 
tivity may be, it Is impor- 
tant to remember that 
children enjoy time spent 
just being outdoors creat- 
ing their own activities, 
—by MARGE 
COLCLOUGH 



■■ ■■■? 



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A FREE MORNING AT 



K'"p%grarn 



CoinP 



utcfs 




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Creative Montessori 

Year Round Pre-School & Child Care 

For Children 2-6 Years Old 

Please Call For Appointment* 949-6340 

1220 Lake Street in Mundelein 








Grand Opening 

Mom, Dad, 

Grandparents, 

Bring The Kids To 

Willy's World 

* Kiddie Ferris Wheel * Kiddie Race Cars 

* Kiddie Bumper Boats * Kiddie Airplane 

Fun Harbor also has Go-Carts, 
Batting Cages, Miniature GolfSi 

Video Games. 

Ask About Our Party Specials. 



BRING IN THI$ AD FOR A 

FREE J^ERRIS WHEEL RIDE 

(Not Good With Any Other Offer) . 



651 Lakehurst Dr., Waukegan 
(Behind Lakehurst Cinema Theatres) 



(708) 578-5400 



Xi 



60 Lakoland Newspapers 



Friday, Juno 4, 1993 



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Newsp£^>ers 



Summer should not be a vacation from learning 



The crisis in education 
and diminisiied aca- 
demic aciiievement 
among U.S. and 
Canadian students Is one 
of tiie tiottest topics 
around today. The media 
routinely headline'sllp- 
ping math and science 
scores; declining educa- 
tional standards and 
quality; and dwindling 
skills proficiency. 

What does that have to 
do with summer 
vacation? 

And what's the con- 



nection between Louis 
Harris, the internationally 
respected pollster, or Joiin 
Scidley, the chairman and 
chief executive officer of 
Apple Commuter hic, 
and lazy hot summer days 
v/hen ctiildren seem to 
have little to occupy 
them? Harris recently re- 
leased a study sponsored 
by North Carolina State 
University on the eco- . 
nomic implications of our 
declining educational 
standards. Our standard 
of living will decline 
sharply over the next cou- 



ple decades, he con- 
cludes, unless we quickly 
take some significant . . 
steps to improve our edu- 
cational systems. 

Sculley echoed that 
conclusion. ."The re- 
sources that come from 
our minds" will shape the 
economic success of na- 
tions, he says. 

Building the resources 
that come from our minds 
and the minds of our 
children must become a 
year-round activity. 
Learning and education 



j;. 




>.^ 



••■•I 
r 



! ^ 



l^ 



Announcing 

Summer Pre-School 

The Early Learning Center now has a 
part-time summer program that offers your 
child developmentally appropriate 
activities in the fully licensed and 
safe center, located on the Saint 
Therese Campus. 



Hours: 9-11 :30 a.m. morning session 
12:30-3 p.m. afternoon session 

Days: Mon. Wed. Fri.—Ages 4-5 
Tues.-Thurs.—Ages 3-4 




For more information, or 
to register, call 360-2733. 




Saint Therese Medical Center 



- 



,\ DiviMon of Traitci^cjn hibtcii llcjtih Cart CoqioKiiion 

2615 Washington Street 
Waukegan, Illinois 600B5 
Telephone 708.249.3900 



Early Learning Center 



is at least as Important an 
activity during summer 
re cess as it is in the winter 
Just before final exams. 

. Conven-'onal school 
schedules, based on a 
century-and-a-half old 
agrarian economy, effec- 
tively shut down the 
learning process of many 
children for three months 
out of the year. Yet the 
long-term implications of 
inadequate education for 
our ciiildren are enor- ' 
mous. 



Providing the oppor- 
tunity for children means 
augmenting their.regular 
educational experience. 
Parents should not allow 
the learning process to be 
shut down for one -quarter 
of each year. 

The U.S. Department 
of Education brings the is- 
sue to a very individual 
level in Its recent report 
on dwindling math skills. 
Students who take more 
high school and 



university mathematics 
courses earn considerably 
higher Income in their 
first ten years of woHc than 
do their peers with fewer 
math skills. "More math 
means more money, n the 
study concludes. 

Or, to state it another 
way, more education 
means better opportunity, 
enhanced earning poten- 
tial, improved quality of 
life.— by RENEE EIMER- 
MAN, director, Vernon 
HIUs 



Must of early childhood legislation 



1. Must improve pro 
gram quality. 

Must improve the 
quality and enforcement 
of standards, including 
those regulating group 
size, staff-child ratio, staff 
qualifications, parental 
Involvement, and health 
and safety. 

Must promote a stable, 
qualified early childhood 
work force that meets ade- 
quate preservlce and con- 
tinuing education re- 
quirements and must ad- 
dress the insufficient 
compensation, low status, 
and inadequate working 
conditions that typify the 
field. 

Must foster continuity 
for children wittiin and 
between programs, now 
and over time. 



Must foster parental 
involvement and in- 
formed parental choice. 

2. Must provide equi- 
table access to good pro- 
grams. 

Must provide direct 
subsidy to low-income 
families. Must make pro- 
visions to ensure program 
stability for ciiiidren as 
families move out of 
poverty. Must provide 
mechainisms such as 
community resource and 
referral to enable parents 
to make informed pro- 
gram choices. 

Must foster socioeco- 
nomic and ethnic diversity 
witiiin programs. Must not 
intentionally or unin- 
tentionally foster segrega- 
tion on the basis of eth- 



nicity, socioeconomic 
status, or special need, 
including "at-risk" status. 

3. Must foster high 
quality service delivery. 

Must provide sufficient 
funds to ensure diat high 
quality services are pro - 
vided. Must integrate 
provision of cliild care 
and educational services. 

Must foster collabora- 
tion among services for 
young ctiildren and their 
families at all levels of 
government. Must pro- 
mote coordination among 
services for ctiildren. Must 
provide for collaboration 
among early childhood 
programs within a com- 
munity. Must allow flexi- 
bility to meet individual 
family and community 
I needs. 



£FT Lake county F«nlly YMCA 

war CHILD CARE CENTERS 

Summer & Fall 
Program Registration 

SAFE ■ CONVENIENT ■ AFFORDABLE I FUN 




GET ONE WEEK 




Now Thru June 21st — YMCA Child Care 



On« we«k depotit due at lims of registratioo. 



^r=41 



UnrtadW^U 



2000 Western Ave. 

Waukegan 

360-9622 

Opon Mon. thru Fri. 6:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 

Children Ages 3-5 



Yt«ts 



706 Hawley St. 

'Mundeiein 
949-0060 

open Man. thru Fri. 6:30 &m.-G:00 p.m. 

Children Ages 2-5 



Friday, Jun« 4. 1993 



Lakoland Newtpapert 61 



i^m-^v 



. tlMSlMKt'-^ 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



TO PLACE 
YOUR AD HERE 

708-223-8161 



™ 



-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 




, !• 



' ., 



,1 




DONT THROW AWAYl 

THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR^ 
LAMP DOCTORS/i 
FOR REPAIRS. 

I WARREN ELECTrIc'iNC, 
33261 N. Highway 45 
Wildwood, IL 60030 
(708) 223-8691 




^ Is Shopping * 
A Chore For You? 

We offer a cariety ofneroicet 
•GROCEKY SHOPPING 
•GIFT SHOPPING ^. 
•ERHAND RUNNING <l< 

ITS AFFORDABLE! y -« 
(708) 949-3170 £^ 





HEATING e 
COOLING 

LENNOX - 

.QUALITY HIGH EFFlCir:NT 
AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE 
•10 POINT SUMMER EFFICIENCY 
CHECK 
•AIR CLEANERS-WATER HEATERS 

•HUMIDIFIERS 

CoMPETmvERwas 

(708) 526-6286 
(815)459-2300 

Serving Your Community 
'Vl*"" SALES-SERVICE 



An Indepentdenl Lennox Daalat 
For 25 Years. 



"CocaSy over 40 years. 



Flntncing 
Available 



VTSA 



24Hour 
Sfttvlca 







Pressure Washing 
Preserving - Staining 

•Decks •Siding 
•Fences •Docks 

Pressure Treated Wood is 

NotWeatherproofi 

INSURED JOHN 

(708) 395-8428 



^ 
^ 
* 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 



WINDOW PAINES 

Putty & Paint Service 



1 



We Make Old 
Windows Look Good 




DlSTWlV 



-^- 



^ as ISORXH AVE. 

c ^:^ AlVriOCH, IL Goooa 

' "^ 708-395-7^17 

FAX. 708-395-1582 

NEED A SIGN OR BANNER IN A HURRY? 

NEED THAT TRUCK LETTERED OR MAYBE 

M AGNEHCS FOR YOUR VEHICLE? 
HOW ABOUT A DISTINCTIVE SANDBLASTED 
OR CARVED SIGN FOR YOUH BUSINESS?? 

WHERE OUR MOST VALUED ASSET IS OUR CUSTOMER. 




Discover 
Renting 

You can do it yourself 

(708) 740-8800 

Found Lake Park 



© 



BUSINESS 
^„^ MANAGEMENT 
?6 SYSTEMS 



a 



iJ_ 



RENTAU INC 



PlERSON 

Heating & 
Cooling 



$10.00 OFF Air Conditioning 
TuncjUp During Mayl 



24 Hour Service 
(708) 872-5353 

Sa!es & Sen/ice Since 1959 



HOME 
REMODELING & 
IMPROVEMENT 

All Phases 
Reasonable Rates 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(708)587-9729 






TROFP ^^ 
GREESMOIISE 

Vegetable & Flower Plants of 

all kinds - *5" and up 
.Perennial & Vegetable Plants 

3" Peat Pots - 95* each 
•Geranium & Potted Plants 

of all kinds 

8 Mika iiorih ofLong Grove 

VamilenorihofRDulfija 

oflOldMdlemyKoad 




, LAWNS FOR LESS ^ 

S M'o«iru;/l'*!«-.ltIi/.ali«"i/niul.:liinK I 

I Cull the Expem % 

sCJ'SlAHOSCAPEMAIMPiNCES 

I (708)4:^8-3667 s 



yF^*'»^-»'-' 



BOOKKEkpiHQ SERVICES FOR SUAa BUSINESSES | 
•Payroll Setvica 
Alt payroll lax forma comploled 
•Bank Hocondllaflons 
•Goneral Lodger 
•Financial Statements 

For A Free Consultation Call 
(708) 587-2766 



SMITH 

Sprrv-Bbush & Roll 



WATERSEAL 
PAINT - STAIN 



siding, mm. wood. d[vvyalj block. 

stucco, concfcto, 

We have Iho expcficnco Qnd iho cqulpmoni 

to do (ho |ob eight. 

Free Esllmalos Roasonoblo Rates . 

(708)244-2202 ASK FOR MEL 



jj Rayal % 
n Deeoratiiig g 

% •Wallpaper Hanging g 
% •Int/Ext Painting g 
% FREE ESTIMATES \ 

% All work insured &. 1 
% guaranteed J 

t (815) a44-8613 J 



Gmcm 



Light Carpentry 

CallNow 

Free Estimates 

Affordable Rates 

- Fully Insured 

Quality Work with Written 

Guarantee 

C708> SZ^-gX07 




62 Lakeland Nowipaper* 



t LAWNWORKS t 

M, • Trees • Maintenance • Shrubs * 

4 -Flagstone Steppers • Sod • Boulder walls * 

A .Spring Clean Up iS^Qk -Reasonable Rates * 
4 ".Retainer Walls SSBB Call Dennis Adams A 

1 NO JOB TOO SMALL! (708) 546-3231 * 



Custom Decks, Patios, & Walks 

By Outdoor Living Specialties 

CONSULTATION & DESIGN 

Free Estimates! Also Available: 

Full Line of Maintenance for Decks 

• Water Seal* Restoration • Staining 



INSURED 
ANTIOCH 




REFERENCES 
(708) 838-0093 | 




Duraclean 

Rated best by 
independent tests. 

Carpet & 
Furniture 
cleaning 

CALL 
TODAY! 

£\ (708) 

'ra 587-2356 



Duraclean 

SPECIALISTS 

Duractean... the standard of 
excellence for over 50 years 




Serving your pairing 
/^sd decokatisg needs. 

Complete Inicrior/Exierior 
Also MurilJ/Cusioin Work 
Qiulity Work • Nc«Uy Done 

FREEEctimates 

Affordable Prices ^^ 

"Have the job done rictitI' 

Call (708) 223-2656 

24 llr. Message 




The Village Astrologer 

> An Invitation to Meet^ 

The New Reader ^atl:|£l 





A gifted psychic knownfor being accuraie and honest, a. 

friend and advisor on everyday l^e. All readings are pri- 
vate and corfideniial. Available for parties and gaihenngs. 

4330 Golf Rd..Skokie ^''^ ^T^'^S ^^^ 
(708) 329-0151 (708)926 ^9196 




-o— ^ 




PULVERIZED 
TOPSOIL 



• Portraits In Your 
Home, On Location 
(Nature) 




y lib 



Sand'Gravel-Etc. 
-Delivered- 

Call for Prices 

KELLY SERVICES 

(708) 587-7500 

CaU Anytime 



PBDB DBBoenunn'i 



mBtlBBBBBBBMJM5E««*S 



I 



*'^ 



VJSi'^'- 



Fine Homes 

^^f%- by 



I OPTIMUM E 

I PAINTING & DECORATING | 

I Expertise In all wall coverings. | 

5 Fine Decoradvo Painling •Muhi-colorod spray g 




Staining 
Dry wall Repair 






r Solis/aclion is My Business g 

708/263-1504 1 

Free «limales'lr«ured'<5fadua(e of ^ 

U.S.Schoo) ol Proiosjional Paperhmging 



•New Homes •Renovations 
ijAdditions •Carpenti7 



■jJ 



iiiiiimiiitsjiHiipH^ 

f 7081 566-4724 



SfWlBBOBBOBBrBBBBBWlBtaiOHmSBCBBBeEi 



RAM ConstrvLCtion 

Specializing in Carpentry 

• New 

1 Construction 

• Remodeling 

Free Estimates - 

Insured 

ROY 
708-740-1447 



S 



Friday, Jun© 4, 1993 






f 



A 




LAKELAMP Newspapers Is Your 



TO 
YOURAD 



708-223^8161 



n^ 



^} 



^?;:Tlirip FiMg Lakeland Area Business & SEfflflfi^ 



^;jt>^;-'*,j_-rjryy 




T&CMETALCp. 

We recycle aluminum cansi 

We olio buy ' •Insulated Wire 
•Copper • BrJts -Lead • StalnloM 

•Aluminum Siding .Boltories • Zinc 

•Aulo Radiotore .Catalylic Convortera 

378 Prdrie St. 
Ciystal Lake, IL 



RICHARDS 



Buyers of non-ferrous metals. 
Inclustrial acco unts welcome. 

5-459-4445 



Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8-5; Sat. 8-1 



1 Blocks, of Hwy. 176 
BehlndJ&L Gas Station 



•Top Quality Profosslonal wont! 
•Very Reasonable Rates 
•Fully Insured 
•Wallpapering 
•Dfywaiin'aplng 
k •Light Carpentry ■ 

[call now for free estimate} 
* 1-800-246-2720 ' 



^ BASEBALL CAPSlij 

i> Polyester, Mesh Back 
E Light or Dark Fronts 
^ $2.49 each! 
^ 144 or more with imprint. 

CalMTEMS and inEAS (708) 438-7488 



&1 



Carpeu • Hardwood • Ccr«nlc • Vinyl 
Kllchcn & Balhroom Remodeling 

.VLLWORK CUARAWTEED 

FltEEESllMATES 

^(708) 356-2500 
(708) 310-5220 



(7081 740-41 3Z 
1 -800-540-9451 



WALLPAPER I 
HANGIHG 

^IS-^^/Rolll 

•Suede •Clolh I 
•Poll tCanvasI 

•Sizing &Wal Prep Ind. 

20 yrs. experience. 

Endfess References 
A Craflsmanl 

(708)838-1669 



FINANCIAL PLANNING 



Robert Ritzwoller, CPA 

• Tax Deferred Investments 

• Ue/DisabHity Insurance 

• Tax Preparation 

FnEE FmuciAL Amims 

Call for details 

(708) 587-4552 



tcWUNDSCAPECO.INC.A 

1 LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS iCONnWCTORS A 

A Servw££MiifC<mlySinul960 ^ 

*.Compuler Design -Seeding ^^f 

j^.-Flagstone Patios •Sodding 4 

A .Stone Walls_ .Planting A 

A .Texture Gardens .Grading * 

t (708)746-8953 a 

AAAAAA*AA***** 

NORM'S HOME 
HMNTEUNGE 

\NoJobTooSn}alLI'IIDoltAIL\ 

iRemodeling 

Kitchens, Bathroom & Rec Room 

•Painting ftnd Wallpapering 

^Flooring 

(All Types) 
•Siding And Roofing 
•Carpentry 

Decks & Additions 

mi Work Very Well Bone 

FREE ESTIMATES, MU 
14141 53M4M 

[DECKS PLUS 

CONSTRUCTION 
[ ^^Ff^» ^^ CARPENTRY 

. Custom Decks • Porches 
.RoomAddilions • Basement Remodeling 
• Bathrooms - Kilchens • Custom Carperttry 
- . Improvflments & Repairs! 



I'BORSIC ei bOKT 
LANDSCAPING 

ILandscapeContractors^ 

' and Maintenance 

silt Seeding , 

Coitiplete Renovation I 

' .Seeding •Sodding 
•Trees .Shrubs 
•Topsoll •Woodchips 
Free Estimates 
(708)662-3134 



(708) 837-62905^ 

^^^^""'^ ''IBOOFiNG 

[^SEAMLESS GUTTERS 
WINDOWS • DOORS 
I DECKS ♦ AWNINGS 
Repair & InsurancejjVofe 



(414)279-6653 



licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



^'^>''. ' 



Quality 

I Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 



ALUMINUM a 
VINYL SIDING 

Sottit & Fascia 
Window Trim • Vinyl 

Replacement Windows ■ 
Work Guaranteed 

Insured -Free Estimates 
25 yrs. Experience 



(708) 526-7222 



STAGG^ & ASSOCIATES. INC ^ 

^^^^^p^^Zu^^K REMODELING DESIG^"^': 

PAT STAG^ — ARCHITSCTURAL DBAFTSifAhr 



class-si-fied/ -klas-e-f id/adj l: divided 
into classes or placed in a class (-ads) 

Why search all over for what you're looking 
for'? Find it in Lakeland Newspapers. The 
REAL Classified Section. 

E&AHOME 
VIPROVEMEIS 

Kitchens • Baths • Decks 

Room Additions 

\ NO JOB TOO small] 

[ Fi^gE ESTIMATES! 

(708) 526-3976 



PHONE 356-7610 
fjiX 358-8747 



INSUBED & BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATES 
(414) 889-8442 

Ploaao Call Gary Kolkau 




.1 




>N0 AnORNEYS, FASr, SIMNE. "^oL ^ 

n.rciMESS PLANS - RESUMES AND MOBE 
rf » SDOmONAl. SERVICES OFFERED 
"^'^Pl^PIi BUSDreSS CENTER 
(708) 548-1300 



DUNCAN 
PAINTING 

Insured Quality Work . ■ 
ReferlS-TopJ^^^^^ 
WE DO OUR OWN WORK 

Call Preston 
(708)566-1002 



,i,S^'^.bi;inUnK.VA«^.l.on.PVC.Aium.rur, 



BALED 
SHAVINGS 

1 Bale or 1,000 
. Cash & Carry 
1/2 mile north StatcUne Rd, 
Bait ofHwyi 45 on County TrunkCJ 

HORTON BROS. 

Bristol. Wl 
(414)857-2525 

Mon.-Frl.B.5,Sat.8-3 




GRAND 

I OPENING, 

' / 

SPniNQ CUAH-UP SPEOAL 

\ubtlclin 1^1 moving pint, el"" 
13^ IndudM ■ eortvloi* ln»p«;tlon Ql 

'^'Sm With this ad ^ 

OnJyFKtonfAutlwriMd V 

DtaWbutorlftLrt* County 'T 

101 N.Seymour A 

Mundeiein, IL // 

fTQB^ 949-9409 ^^ 



r 




Colonial 





KITCHENS. BATHS 

DOOR & WINDOW 

REPLACEMENTS, 

SKYLIGHTS, DECKS 

SMALL JOBS A 

SPECIALTY 
Free Estimates 

(708) 438-7908 



Visit Our Siiowroom & Faclory 
Meieris Fence 

FreoInHoms Os^ 

Estimates 726-T66S 507-771 1 - 

B00-824'1B57 iftttE Zuric h foxuke- 



FOUR PAWS 

TRAINING CENTER 

l"PositivJ^aTnlng With Positive Results"! 

h'OSIllVC iiM"« » ,.„..„H.,rfivi classes and observe a dltler- 

' All training methods are nol «'^; ^^^ .^fffi.t^usS^ and praise and 
ent approach lo dog training Ou methods uiiuzo^ . ^ ^^ ^^^ 

r£rp.?;raSrX!:rrX^^^ 

rFor--iSorma,.np,ease^ve u^^^^^^^ ^^^^al 

20970 WhltG Road • Antloch, lL6O0o^ yruo; j 



BuUd TO Suit. Your Lot Or Om 
^MPUnEHEMODQJNG SERVICES. 

y^^UMINUM SIDING. GUTTERS. 

DECKS. GARAGES, ADOmONS. 

KITCHENS and BATHROOMS 



John Orr • Oontr 



708-973-2120 | 



COUPON- — — — '— 

BUVIMO \ 

Aluminum Cans 

♦COPPER *BRASS 
* AUTO RADIATORS 

11 *LEAD 




RICKTHE 
HANDY GUY 

'For QutBtf Workmanship' I 
We win do lh6 smal jobs rw one I 

wants, and iJie big jobs I 
everybody does, we iusl do it I 

10% OFF WITH THIS ADl 
FREE (708)540-7890 

EOTWLVTES (815) »M.5768 

. Plumbing • Kitchen & Baths • Decks I 
. FiP^trlcal* Carpentry 'Painting 'Basements \ 



I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

t 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 



A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 
(708) 587-0788 

HOURS: 

'Mon.-Fri. 

9 a.m. • 5 p.m. 

Sat. 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

closed 12-12:30 for lunch 

Receive 24 MORE per pound 

over our current prices on 

aluminum cans 




> Expires 7-X8-93 . 

Lakeland Newspapers 63 




Friday, Juno 4. 1993 



IS' 



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ApP' 



etize^s 



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.wf, r™.!'-''""'^- 



,T^3onU rings and3BDW 



Ditinex veal 



,,_-^ . $9.25 

BBQBIBS haUslato ^\^vT.ataHol 



BBS cojJBa^-p-^d ribs ^^ 

ROAST POiUt^/ 



l^-^'^'"-'' , ^ *'■« 

vrtlh splcfecw. ..sy 



RO/»*-- 

"■s^---r« -^^ 



breaded ^^Jj:;chovic3 and sp^... ., 



^^-^^'^^'SScSp bacon. 
- green beans ^^'•^^.dv^^^^^P*'^^' 



' BEEF ■■-.■. .*S:^ff^--. fish:,-: 




i^? 



^itme^^-^-^";;;^ ; ^^-^^ b^^So^^ST... 



wllb 6 sm-r - $9.75 

,0 ox BIBBYE STEAK 

'^J5; onion r^nfi« 



^ 'nr-' ■ " '• ' ' ' "^ ' ■ B^^" ^ ZEALAND $8.^ 

'6* ., BAKEOAI*^ „cTtrH.lCODl 

CHICKBN ^9,5 ^oORMAN"^^^^^ $10 

„nASTDUCH _«^^CAMPl • $. 

^'^ro^fi^--^ *«-^^ 

,^1BU CfflCKET) ^6.95 

CHICKEN ^^^ ■ 

CHICKEN BKEASTD 
w*th rice .57'^= 



- .-r-j$8;;95; ■.■.■ 

SAirt^^'r'" .. -, •■-■"*";?,• 

~-''^^T» PIKE— ■"•••"*""" - ■ ■ ...l.^G.lo 

|SSoi°-^°««°" 

^n NSW «"''"" .; .«8fl5 . 

»"^«M BOOQW .,(5.95 

BAKEOAl»^ „,CODl _ 

POOR MAN'S ^^^ $10.95 

SHKIMP SCAMPI .••—-•••• $9.25 



Check out oar 



«=«■"" B^KPt *'• 

« - .^^B'JOm.- "^^ScrcW""""" .S5.95 

\,™ COFWSB ben -^i^Mge & ritt 



7 Days A Week 
Starting At 6 a.m. 



CSOISSAJVTS ^^''wiches 



'"cbandtomat 



— r*CBEESE «5.25 « ^'^SURGERS 

^^ARUN * c^E^;- «5.25 ' °' «^GER a^^^ 

OmCKH^ORxc^^^; ^.95 '::"^«^«^O.BL.: ^3.45 

"« CHEESEBlrtlCfiR norm, ^^'^^ 

»^'""=«=».a^o'S!: *^'«= 

°« BACON c«n.». 

-.KS DOUBLE ****»"«aEI, 

" "WTSTEAK '*"'"=" 

-p^&.£§S5' *^- 

"-'^^ar/ettucc:"'-^ S,95 ^ ^^^^ 

^--^^''^o------ see. ^^--S- 

' °'^"' «^«" 3.U^cd Cv., . " *''•' °^'-^^ 






CHICKE^ OR Ttiv^ „ *^inner Sm,.^ 

'cuuce. $4 g_ 



^ ' 




^9 fti 

Remember, we re w ^^^ 

You'll be ^^-^'r'^X^^^^^on.y... 
You deserve the most lor you 

Quality, Service ond Value. ^^^ j^^^,^^, 

^"'""Sourtl^ast sevin years! ^ 

Jensen House inc i^u ___^2=is^^^«^^^^ 



GRttLED CHEESP ^\ 

REIVER u^. r^^ W/FRjEs 



• cucumbers 



■'a^ge $4.05 



l^;^'^"^ «-^^"ndg?£s!^ 

,. ^'^^O CHEESP nr 

^EiVER HOT nof ^^^^^ES.... • 

-— „..ci^-;i;^. :::r:.s 

' ipcS^— ".n.^^^^^ade Desserts' "" 

■^f^i-ffi „ I'-'s cnSSXi?S^'^»iir is 

■■ --zt^ o^'-^^T^^-^o, 

^'rS^'x-re ^!^«^«ges 

COFFEE — 



""" S.75 rpc.r. , 

"^ $.75 ^''^MONaDE ... -. $ ; 

r.... • "*'n 

,' *•? 

BRINKS...- CM* 

SM$.75 /,,*. 



*i.75 

$2.25 

«2.'a5 



*WLIC... 



iiiR 



WIHE 



M Lak«land NowtpaP«'» 



- Bue**"^"* ■'